Novels of Nineteenth Century Europe

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The British and Irish in the 19th Century
Mysteries: 19th Century Britain
Novels by and Inspired by Jane Austen
Mysteries Inspired by Jane Austen
The European Continent in the 19th Century
Mysteries: 19th Century European Continent

Queen Victoria

Nineteenth century Europe featured the English Regency period, which gave rise to the "Regency romance" genre. Jane Austen wrote during this time, and a number of modern authors have borrowed her characters to create a distinct new Jane-Austen-inspired genre of historical fiction.

From 1837-1901, England's Queen Victoria presided over an era known for the expansion of the British Empire and rigid social rules that masked a surge in poverty and crime. In both the British Isles and the European Continent, the Industrial Revolution brought impressive advances in technology, made fortunes for many, and trapped others in lives of oppressive drudgery. The 1845 Irish Potato Famine (not limited to Ireland) caused enormous suffering and a surge in emigration.

George MacDonald Fraser's popular Flashman series about a British soldier is set in the British Empire period. For novels set during the time of Napoleon, see the Napoleonic Era page. The Jane Austen genre and some classic Regency romance novels (specifically Georgette Heyer's) are listed below; for a more complete listing of Regency romances, consult a website devoted to historical romance.



The British and Irish in the 19th Century

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Peter Ackroyd, The Case Book of Victor Frankenstein (2009), a literary novel which imagines that the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and Victor Frankenstein, creator of the Frankenstein monster, were students together at Oxford. Review at The Independent


Louise Allen, The Dangerous Mr. Ryder (2008), historical romance about a British agent assigned to smuggle out of Napoleon's France a French noblewoman with an English son; #1 in the Those Scandalous Ravenhursts series.

Louise Allen, The Outrageous Lady Felsham (2008), historical romance about a young widow who has an affair with a viscount who turns up in her bedroom in the wee hours of the morning; #2 in the Those Scandalous Ravenhursts series.

Louise Allen, The Shocking Lord Standon (2008), historical romance about a respectable man who discovers the solution to his own difficulty when he assists a naked woman out of hers; #3 in the Those Scandalous Ravenhursts series.

Louise Allen, The Disgraceful Mr. Ravenhurst (2009), historical romance about a reckless man who falls in love with his bluestocking cousin, whose drab exterior conceals a passionate nature; #4 in the Those Scandalous Ravenhursts series.

Louise Allen, The Notorious Mr. Hurst (2009), historical romance about an aristocratic young woman who falls in love with a theatre owner who doesn't believe in love; #5 in the Those Scandalous Ravenhursts series.

Louise Allen, The Piratical Miss Ravenhurst (2009), historical romance about a young woman from Jamaica who is kidnapped by pirates; #6 in the Those Scandalous Ravenhursts series.


Karin Altenberg, Island of Wings (2011), about a British couple who go to St. Kilda in the Hebrides to serve as missionaries in 1830. Review at The Daily Mail

Lyn Andrews, Maggie May (2009), about a young woman who grew up in the slums of Liverpool burdened with the name her father gave her, that of a notorious prostitute.

Evelyn Anthony, Victoria and Albert (1958; also titled Victoria), about the young Queen Victoria and her marriage to Prince Albert.

Aileen Armitage, Conflict of Interest (2005 reissue; originally published 1972 as Shadow of Dungeon Wood under the name Aileen Quigley), about a mill town in Yorkshire in 1812 during the Industrial Revolution.

Gaynor Arnold, Girl in a Blue Dress (2008), about the widow of a famous writer (a fictionalized version of Charles Dickens) and her memories of their troubled marriage.

Alison Atlee, The Typewriter Girl (2013), about a down-on-her-luck typist in Victorian London who seizes her opportunity for a job at a seaside resort, offered to her by the builder of the resort's pleasure fair. Review

Carmel McMurdo Audsley, Ours, Yours and Mines (2012), about a family living in the miners' rows of Ayrshire Scotland from the mid-1800s into the early 1900s; self-published.

Beryl Bainbridge, Master Georgie (1998), about a homosexual British physician who volunteers to serve as a medical officer in the Crimean War.

Lori Baker, The Glass Ocean (2013), about a glassmaker and the daughter of a seaman who meet aboard ship on her naturalist father's expedition to the New World.


Mary Balogh, First Comes Marriage (2009), Regency romance about a young viscount who has promised to find a wife by Christmas and three very different sisters; #1 in the Huxtable series.

Mary Balogh, Then Comes Seduction (2009), Regency romance about a young baron who makes a wager while in his cups that he will succeed in seducing a wealthy and exceptionally virtuous young woman; #2 in the Huxtable series.

Mary Balogh, At Last Comes Love (2009), Regency romance about a woman tricked into a betrothal who gives her fiancé an ultimatum; #3 in the Huxtable series.

Mary Balogh, Seducing an Angel (2009), Regency romance about a young woman wrongly branded a murderess and driven into destitution who comes to London to find a wealthy man she can tempt into taking her as his mistress; #4 in the Huxtable series. Review

Mary Balogh, The Arrangement (2013), a Regency romance about a gentleman and a young woman who agree to a marrage of convenience.


Joanna Barnden, Running Against the Tide (2013), about a London shipping magnate's daughter who falls in love with an apprentice lighterman in 1800.

Jonathan Barnes, The Somnambulist (2008), a darkly comic literary satire of nineteenth century detective novels, about a stage magician investigating a plot to destroy London.

Julian Barnes, Arthur and George, nineteenth century author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle uses his insights as a writer of detective stories to help a man wrongly convicted of a crime.

Andrea Barrett, Servants of the Map, a collection of short stories set mostly in the early nineteenth century.

Andrea Barrett, Voyage of the Narwhal (1998), about an 1855 expedition to the Arctic in search of a lost ship.

Susan Barrett, Fixing Shadows (2005), about a duchess who takes a governess's illegitimate baby when her own baby dies in 1873, in order to secure an inheritance.

Peter Behrens, The Law of Dreams, a young Irishman journeys from famine-stricken Ireland to England, Wales and across the ocean to America.

Melanie Benjamin, Alice I Have Been (2010), a biographical novel about Alice Liddell, the real girl who inspired Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. Review

James Benmore, Dodger (2013), about Charles Dickens' character The Artful Dodger, who returns to London from an Australian penal colony in search of treasure.

M.M. Bennetts, May 1812 (2009), a romantic Regency about a man who must marry the bride designated in his late father's will or lose his fortune. Review

A.L. Berridge, Into the Valley of Death (2012), about a British soldier who clashes with his incompetent superiors, who may be under an evil influence, during the Crimean War.

Rachel Billington, Maria and the Admiral (2012), about the widowed travel writer Maria Graham, living in Chile in 1822 when Admiral Thomas Cochrane arrives there on his way to a military campaign in Brazil. Review at The Independent

Carol Birch, Jamrach’s Menagerie (2011), about a street urchin recruited to join a whaling ship's voyage in search of a dragon. Review

Jessica Blair, Stay With Me (2009), about a young woman who expected to inherit a share of her father's shipping business, only to see the entire business go to her stepbrother after her parents die in the 1879 collapse of the Tay Rail Bridge.

Jill Blee, Brigid, set during the nineteenth century Irish potato famine.

Faye L. Booth, Trades of the Flesh (2009), about a young prostitute in 1888 London who wishes to change her trade after she meets a surgeon and begins helping him find corpses for dissection, an activity as dangerous as prostitution.

Clare Boylan, Emma Brown: A Novel From the Unfinished Manuscript by Charlotte Brontë, about a plain young woman enrolled at a ladies' boarding school who turns out not to be the heiress she claimed to be; based on a fragment by Charlotte Brontë.

John Boyne, This House is Haunted (2013), a Dickensian ghost story about a young woman who takes a job as governess in 1867 and discovers that her charges are two children living alone in a manor in a remote part of Norfolk.

Paula Brackston, The Winter Witch (2013), a paranormal romance about a mute woman with mysterious abilities who marries a drover in a Welsh village.

James Bradley, The Resurrectionist (2007), about the grave robbers who supplied cadavers for nineteenth century medical students.

Melvyn Bragg, Maid of Buttermere (1988), about John Hatfield, a bigamist, and the lovely and unsuspecting shepherdess, Mary Robinson, whom he married in England's Lake District in 1802.

Anne Brear, The Day Embroidered (2013), about a Yorkshire woman who agrees to marry an old flame who offers to help her reconcile with her family.

Wallace Breem, The Leopard and the Cliff (1978), about a quietly heroic British officer during the 1919 war between India and Afghanistan. Review

Gerri Brightwell, The Dark Lantern (2008), about a late nineteenth century housemaid who must conceal the fact that her mother was hanged as a murderess when she takes a job with a forensic scientist and his wife, who has secrets of her own.

Debra Brown, The Companion of Lady Holmeshire (2011), about a young woman raised as a foundling who becomes a companion to a woman who introduces her to society.

Eli Brown, Cinnamon and Gunpowder (2013), a humorous romance about a chef kidnapped by a female pirate in 1819.

Ginny Bryce, Terra Feliz (2011), about an orphaned young woman who marries a much older merchant and goes with him to an island off the American coast, where she falls in love with another man; self-published.

Sian Busby, McNaughten (2009), about a despairing Scotsman who shoots at the Prime Minister's private secretary on a London Street in 1843, and his trial, the outcome of which will have a permanent effect on English law.

A.S. Byatt, Possession, a literary novel about two young scholars in contemporary Britain researching a pair of Victorian writers and their love affair.

Elizabeth Byrd, The Famished Land: A Novel of the Irish Potato Famine, about a young woman’s struggle to survive during the nineteenth century potato famine.

Peter Carey, Jack Maggs, about an outlaw recently returned to London from an Australian prison colony.

Peter Carey, The Chemistry of Tears (2012), about a present-day woman working to restore a nineteenth-century automaton, and the story of the Englishman who originally commissioned the automaton to entertain his consumptive son.

Jamie Carie, The Duchess and the Dragon, a Regency romance about a woman torn between two men; Christian message.

Angela Carter, Nights at the Circus, about a trapeze artist.

Jonatha Ceely, Mina, about a young woman who loses her family during the Irish potato famine and goes to work on an English estate after her attempt to emigrate to America fails.

Jonatha Ceely, Bread and Dreams, about a young Irish woman who dresses as a boy and takes a job on a ship so she can emigrate to America after losing her family in the potato famine; sequel to Mina.

Loretta Chase, Don't Tempt Me (2009), a Regency romance about a woman whose travels in the East have taught her more about the sensual arts than is proper for a young Englishwoman to know.


Marion Chesney, Refining Felicity (1988, also published under author's pen name M.C. Beaton), a Regency romance about two spinster sisters left destitute after they fail to receive an inheritance, who open a school for refining unruly young women and arranging marriages for them, and their first charge; #1 in the School for Manners series.

Marion Chesney, Perfecting Fiona (1989, also published under author's pen name M.C. Beaton), a Regency romance about two spinster sisters who run a school for refining unruly young women and arranging marriages for them, and their charge who refuses all suitors until she meets a rake; #2 in the School for Manners series.

Marion Chesney, Enlightening Delilah (1989, also published under author's pen name M.C. Beaton), a Regency romance about two spinster sisters who run a school for refining unruly young women and arranging marriages for them, and their charge who refuses to marry after a man woos her and vanishes; #3 in the School for Manners series.

Marion Chesney, Finessing Clarissa (1989, also published under author's pen name M.C. Beaton), a Regency romance about two spinster sisters who run a school for refining unruly young women and arranging marriages for them, and their clumsy, freckled charge; #4 in the School for Manners series.

Marion Chesney, Animating Maria (1990, also published under author's pen name M.C. Beaton), a Regency romance about two spinster sisters who run a school for refining unruly young women and arranging marriages for them, and their amazingly refined charge whose boorish parents are the reason she can't find a husband; #5 in the School for Manners series.

Marion Chesney, Marrying Harriet (1990, also published under author's pen name M.C. Beaton), a Regency romance about two spinster sisters who run a school for refining unruly young women and arranging marriages for them, and their charge who seems more intent on finding matches for them than on her own prospects; #6 in the School for Manners series.


Tracy Chevalier, Remarkable Creatures (2009), about Mary Anning, the working class woman who discovered ichthyosaur and plesiosaur fossils near Lyme Regis in the early nineteenth century, but was never given credit for her discoveries. Review

Clare Clark, The Great Stink (2005), about an engineer building a new system to replace the overwhelmed London sewers in the mid-nineteenth century.

Clare Clark, Beautiful Lies (2012), about the wife of a liberal Scottish MP and the secrets of her past that endanger her husband's career. Review

Lindsay Clarke, The Chymical Wedding (1989), a literary novel about a contemporary poet and a nineteenth century alchemist, united across time by mysterious dreams.

Anne Cleeland, Daughter of the God-King (2013), about the daughter of British archaeologists who goes to Egypt in search of them after they disappear.

Paul Fraser Collard, The Scarlet Thief (2013), about a British soldier fighting in the Crimean War; #1 in a planned series.

James Conan, The Coburg Conspiracy (2008), a thriller about a terrorist plot to assassinate Queen Victoria, the Kaiser, the Tsar and 26 other members of the Saxe-Coburg family in 1894.


Gloria Cook, Keeping Echoes (2005), about three young women struggling to make ends meet and find love in a poor copper-mining village; #1 in the Meryen Saga.

Gloria Cook, Out of Shadows (2007), about the young widow of a tyrannical husband whose stepson creates problems for her and her village; #2 in the Meryen Saga.

Gloria Cook, All in a Day (2008), about the women in a poor copper-mining village and their struggles to survive and find love; #3 in the Meryen Saga.

Gloria Cook, Holding the Light (2008), about a sixteen-year-old girl whose bullying father takes over the farm she has inherited; #4 in the Meryen Saga.

Gloria Cook, Dream Chasers (2009), about a young woman in a poor copper-mining village who is unaware of the squire's love for her; #5 and last in the Meryen Saga.


Catherine Cookson, The Glass Virgin (1969), about a young woman raised by aristocratic parents in Victorian England who is forced into the lower class after learning a long-kept secret about her birth.

Catherine Cookson, The Black Velvet Gown (1984), about a working-class widow in the 1830s whose ability to read and write is both a gift and a problem.

Catherine Cookson, The Harrogate Secret (1988), about a young smuggler in Tyneside.

Catherine Cookson, The Gillyvors (1990, also titled The Love Child), about the six children of an unmarried couple and their efforts to rise above the shame of being born gillyvors, bastards.

Catherine Cookson, The Rag Nymph (1991), about a woman who works as a rag trader in the 1850s and the seven-year-old girl who transforms her life.

Catherine Cookson, The Maltese Angel (1992), about a man condemned by his rural community for marrying a beautiful dancer from outside the village instead of his childhood sweetheart.

Catherine Cookson, The Golden Straw (1993), about a young woman whose life is changed by the gift of an exceptional straw hat when she wears it on a holiday trip in Nice.

Catherine Cookson, The Desert Crop (1997), a coming-of-age story about a boy in a farming family whose widowed father marries in the hope of receiving his new wife's expected inheritance. Review


Amy Corwin, Smuggled Rose, historical romance about a woman living in obscurity in Dover after being ruined by a scandal, who makes a hazardous living by receiving smuggled goods, including roses.

Thomas B. Costain, The Tontine, about financial schemes in nineteenth century England.

Dilly Court, A Loving Family (2013), about a kitchen maid who must leave her employment and goes in search of her family, who have disappeared.

Michael Crichton, The Great Train Robbery (1973), about an audaciously clever plot in Victorian London to rob a train carrying a fortune in gold.

Elaine Crowley, Kilgoran, about an Irish woman during the nineteenth century potato famine.

John Crowley, Lord Byron's Novel (2005), about Lord Byron's daughter Ada and a novel Byron might have written.

John Crowley, Little, Big (2002), literary historical fantasy about a man who marries a woman living in a nineteenth century mansion designed by a visionary architect and becomes acquainted with other dimensions of time and possibility.

Jeanine Cummins, The Crooked Branch (2013), about a present-day New York mother who discovers her Irish great-grandmother's diary from the time of the Great Famine.

Catherine Czerkawska, The Physic Garden (2014), about a gardener who collects specimens for a university lecturer in botany in Glasgow, and the botanist's betrayal of their friendship.

Stevie Davies, Awakening (2013), a literary novel about two sisters in 1860 Wiltshire a year after the publication of Darwin's The Origin of Species.

Katy Darby, The Whores' Asylum, (2012), about a medical student in Victorian Oxford who volunteers at a shelter for fallen women, and his friend who is studying for the priesthood.

Saul David, Zulu Hart (2009), about the bastard son of an English general and a Zulu mother who grows up in England, but then becomes a soldier in South Africa just before the Zulu War begins; #1 in the Zulu Hart series.

Saul David, Hart of Empire (2010), about a British officer, the bastard son of an English general and a Zulu mother, who is sent on a secret mission to Afghanistan; #2 in the Zulu Hart series.


Gideon Defoe, The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists (2004), the humorous tale of a pirate captain who sinks Charles Darwin's ship in the mistaken belief it was carrying treasure and agrees to help Darwin save his brother from an evil bishop; #1 in the Pirates! series.

Gideon Defoe, The Pirates! In an Adventure with Ahab (2005; also titled The Pirates! In an Adventure with Moby Dick), the humorous tale of a pirate captain who buys a new ship on credit and decides to capture the notorious White Whale for the reward offered by Ahab; #2 in the Pirates! series.

Gideon Defoe, The Pirates! In an Adventure with Communists (2006), the humorous tale of a pirate captain who is imprisoned in 1840 because he is mistaken for Karl Marx; #3 in the Pirates! series.

Gideon Defoe, The Pirates! In an Adventure with Napoleon (2008), the humorous tale of a pirate captain passed over for a "Pirate of the Year" award who decides to raise bees on the Isle of St. Helena instead, just as the defeated Napoleon Bonaparte is sent there; #4 in the Pirates! series.

Gideon Defoe, The Pirates! In an Adventure with the Romantics (2012), the humorous tale of a pirate captain who goes with his crew on vacation at Lake Geneva, where they encounter Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, and Shelley's fiancée, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin; #5 in the Pirates! series.


R.F. Delderfield, God Is an Englishman, a former soldier sets out to raise a fortune after returning from the Crimea and India; #1 in the Swann Family Saga.

R.F. Delderfield, Theirs Was the Kingdom, #2 in the Swann Family Saga.

R.F. Delderfield, Give Us This Day, #3 in the Swann Family Saga.

Leslie Dicken, A Tarnished Heart, about a pastor's daughter in Victorian England who is in love with her father's curate, but instead is forced into an unhappy marriage with an aristocrat.

Michelle Diener, Banquet of Lies (2013), about a young woman working as a spy who poses as a cook in an aristocratic household.

E.A. Dinely, The Death of Lyndon Wilder and the Consequences Thereof (2013), about a governess who accepts a position at a mismanaged estate in deep mourning over the death of an heir.

Elaine diRollo, A Proper Education for Girls (forthcoming in April 2009), a comic novel set in 1857 about twin sisters in England who are separated when their father marries one to a missionary in India and makes the other curator of his artifact collection.

Julianne Donaldson, Edenbrooke (2012), Regency romance about a "dull" young woman sent to Bath while her elegant twin is treated to a season in London.

Julianne Donaldson, Blackmoore: A Proper Romance (2013), Regency romance about a woman determined to remain unwed after her mother and sisters have scandalized society.


Jennifer Donnelly, The Tea Rose, about a young woman in 1888 London striving for a better life; #1 in the Tea Rose trilogy.

Jennifer Donnelly, The Winter Rose, about a woman doctor in London who becomes involved with a gangster; #2 in the Tea Rose trilogy.

Jennifer Donnelly, The Wild Rose (2011), about a group of young people in London on the eve of World War I; #3 in the Tea Rose trilogy.


Emma Donoghue, The Sealed Letter (2008), about an unmarried woman active in the nineteenth century women's movement who becomes embroiled in a scandalous divorce case when she tries to help a friend. Review

Daphne du Maurier, Jamaica Inn, a young woman faces danger in nineteenth century Cornwall.

Daphne du Maurier, Julius, about an ambitious French peasant who builds a fortune in nineteenth century England.

Daphne du Maurier, My Cousin Rachel, a novel of suspense set in nineteenth century Cornwall.

Daphne du Maurier, The Loving Spirit, a family saga set in nineteenth century Cornwall.

Brian Duncan, The Settler (2012), about a young Englishman who emigrates to South Africa, fights in the Matabele War of 1893 and falls in love, then finds himself on the opposite side of the Boer War from a friend; self-published.

Catherine Dunne, Another Kind of Life, about three middle class Dublin sisters and two working class sisters in Belfast in late nineteenth century Ireland.

Lynn D'Urso, Heartbroke Bay (2010), about a young Englishwoman who elopes in 1898 and travels to Alaska where she and her husband struggle for survival during a bitterly harsh winter.

Arabella Edge, Fields of Ice (2011), about the cook for Sir John Franklin’s doomed final expedition in search of the Northwest Passage and Franklin's wife's efforts to find her husband.

Robert Edric, Gathering the Water (2006), a literary novel about a man charged with the task of overseeing the flooding of a valley in northern England in 1847.

Robert Edric, The Broken Lands: A Novel of Arctic Disaster (1992), a literary novel about an 1845 British expedition to find "the Northwest Passage" which became trapped in Arctic ice.

Erica Eisdorfer, The Wet Nurse's Tale (2009), about a working-class mother in 1847 England who becomes a wet-nurse after becoming pregnant and losing her job, and must leave her own baby to nurse those of other women. Review or Author Interview

Charles Elford, Black Mahler (2011), about Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, a London man of mixed white and black African parentage who struggles for acceptance in Victorian England and becomes a composer; self-published.

Erastes, Standish (2006), gay historical erotica about two men and their love affair in Georgian England.

Erastes, Frost Fair (2008), historical gay erotica set in Regency England.

Barbara Erskine, Whispers in the Sand (2011), about a present-day woman who retraces her great-grandmother's nineteenth-century cruise on the Nile and discovers, while reading her diary, the mysterious dangers posed by an ancient scent bottle she has brought along.

Karen Essex, Dracula in Love: The Private Diary of Mina Harker (2010), a retelling of Bram Stoker's Dracula story as a darkly passionate romance.

Bernardine Evaristo, Blonde Roots (2008), alternative history about a white European child kidnapped and sent into slavery on a Caribbean island controlled by black overlords.

Barbara Ewing, Rosetta (2006), about a nineteenth century English woman interested in heiroglyphics.

Barbara Ewing, The Mesmerist (2007), about a nineteenth century English actress who becomes a phreno-mesmerist when she is unable to find work on the stage.

Michel Faber, The Crimson Petal and the White (2002), a bestselling literary novel about a prostitute striving for a better life in Victorian London.

Sebastian Faulks, Human Traces, about the fledgling years of psychiatry during the late nineteenth century.

Sherry Lynn Ferguson, Merely a Mister, (2012), historical romance about a marquis mistaken for a common man, who is recovering from an illness in England's Lake District in the home of a man whose daughter is an herbalist.

Max Fincher, The Pretty Gentleman (2013), about an aspiring painter in Regency London who has a clandestine affair with his patron and becomes a murder suspect when his erotic drawings of the murdered man are discovered; self-published.

Laura Fish, Strange Music (2008), about ailing English poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning and two women in Jamaica, a maidservant and a field worker.

Richard Flanagan, Wanting (2009), about Charles Dickens and his efforts to assist the widow of Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin in clearing his name from accusations of cannibalism.

James Fleming, Thomas Gage (2003), about a man whose happy life turns to tragedy when the railroad crosses his land.

Ken Follett, A Dangerous Fortune (1993), about a banking family in Victorian England whose fortunes are built on a foundation of corruption and murder.

Margaret Forster, Lady's Maid (1991), about "Wilson," the lady's maid of Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Adam Foulds, The Quickening Maze (2009), about British nature poet John Clare in 1840 when his struggles with alcohol and depression brought him to an asylum in Epping Forest. Review at the Boston Globe

John Fowles, The French Lieutenant’s Woman, a literary novel about a love affair in Victorian England, with alternative endings.

Essie Fox, The Somnambulist (2011), about a young woman in Victorian England who begins exploring dark family secrets after the death of her beautiful aunt, a singer in a music hall.

Essie Fox, The Goddess and the Thief (2013), about an orphaned British girl born and raised in India and living with her aunt, who works as a spiritualist and is plotting to steal the Koh-i-Noor Diamond.

Ronald Frame, Havisham (2012), a novel which imagines the life as a young woman of Miss Havisham from Dickens' novel Great Expectations.


George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman (1969), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel who becomes a British soldier after being expelled from Rugby for drunkenness, and his subsequent adventures in Scotland, India and Afghanistan; #1 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Royal Flash (1970), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel and his adventures as a British soldier during the 1848 Revolutions in Europe; #2 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flash for Freedom! (1971), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel and his adventures as a British soldier after being captured by the U.S. Navy; #3 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman at the Charge (1973), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel and his adventures as a British soldier during the Crimean War; #4 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman in the Great Game (1975), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel and his adventures as a British soldier in India during the Sepoy Mutiny; #5 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman's Lady (1977), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel in the British army who must rescue his wife when she is kidnapped in Singapore; #6 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman and the Redskins (1982), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel in the British army and his adventures when he flees across the American West with a New Orleans madam; #7 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman and the Dragon (1985), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel in the British army who discovers he is carrying guns to the Taiping Rebels in China rather than the opium he thought he was smuggling; #8 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman and the Mountain of Light (1990), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel and his adventures as a British soldier in India, where he acquired the Koh-i-Noor Diamond; #9 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman and the Angel of the Lord (1994), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel in the British army and his adventures in the U.S. where he becomes involved in John Brown's Harper's Ferry Raid; #10 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman and the Tiger (1999), a collection of three stories about a charming scoundrel in the British army; #11 in the Flashman series.

George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman on the March (2005), a humorous novel about a charming scoundrel and his adventures as a British soldier in Abyssinia; #12 in the Flashman series.


Jean Fullerton, Perhaps Tomorrow (2011), historical romance about a young London widow struggling to manage her husband's East End coal business who hires a man recently escaped from the penal colony at Botany Bay.

Joanna Fulford, The Wayward Governess (2009), historical romance about a young woman who flees marriage to become a governess in Yorkshire.

Jean Fullerton, Hold on to Hope, (2012), historical romance about a woman in London's East End whose husband returns from prison shortly before she meets a man for whom she feels a strong attraction.

Matthew Gallaway, The Metropolis Case (2010), about an opera singer in nineteenth-century Paris and three people involved with music in 1960s New York whose lives are all touched by Wagner's Tristan and Isolde.

Elizabeth Garner, The Ingenious Edgar Jones (2009), about a clever boy who declines a university education and goes to work for a blacksmith instead, where an Oxford professor finds him and recognizes his unique gifts.

Catherine Gaskin, Falcon for a Queen, about a young woman raised in China who returns to her grandfather's estate in Scotland, where he runs a whiskey distillery.

Sue Gee, The Mysteries of Glass (2004), about a devout young curate in the Welsh Marches in the 1860s who falls in love with a married woman.

Denise Giardina, Emily's Ghost (2009), about Emily Brontë and the idealistic clergyman William Weightman, a champion of rights for mill workers.

Elisabeth Gifford, The Sea House (2014), about a couple who buy a house in Scotland's Outer Hebrides in the 1990s, and a previous resident in the 1860s, a newly ordained vicar and amateur scientist who hopes to uncover the truth behind the legend of the selkies.

Elizabeth Goudge, Green Dolphin Street, about a pair of sisters from the Channel Islands and the man they both love, who emigrates to New Zealand and sends for one sister to become his wife, but absent-mindedly writes the other sister's name in his letter.

Posie Graeme-Evans, The Dressmaker (2010), about a girl who grows up poor in rural Norfolk, and later makes her living as a dress designer to the "Great Six Hundred," the aristocrats of England.

Brendan Graham, The Whitest Flower (1998), about an Irishwoman who loses her husband in the Potato Famine and is tricked into emigrating to Australia without her children.

Christina Green, The Far Land (2009 in the U.K.), historical romance about a young woman in a seaside village in Devon in 1888 who longs to travel, but is not sure who would make the best companion for her travels or her life.

Julia Gregson, The Water Horse (2004; titled Band of Angels in the U.S.), about a young Welsh woman who becomes one of Florence Nightingale's nurses during the Crimean War.

T.D. Griggs, Distant Thunder, (2012), about the son of British colonials in India who goes to England determined to get revenge on the man who assaulted and killed his mother, but whose plans are disrupted by falling in love.

Romesh Gunesekera, The Prisoners of Paradise, (2012), about a young Englishwoman who goes to live with family on their plantation in Mauritius in 1825, where she becomes attracted to a Ceylonese translator amid growing protests against slavery.

George Hagen, Tom Bedlam (2007), a sprawling novel about a boy born into poverty in Victorian London who emigrates to South Africa after his education is sponsored by a wealthy relative and he becomes a physician.

Helen Halstead, The Imaginary Gentleman: A Regency Intrigue, about a woman who encounters a mysterious gentleman as a storm is brewing in 1806 Lyme Regis; not readily available outside the U.K.

Darci Hannah, The Exile of Sara Stevenson (2010), about a young Scottish woman sent to a remote lighthouse in 1814 after her lover mysteriously vanishes, leaving her pregnant.

Charlotte Hardy, The Road Home (2009), a coming-of-age story about a young man from a rural Irish background who knows the uncle and aunt who raised him are not his real family, and his search for identity and love.

Charlotte Hardy, Sarah (2007), historical romance about a desperate nineteenth-century woman who accepts work as a governess for a barrister's son.

Bruno Hare, The Lost Kings (2010), about a watchmaker who sets out to find treasure along the border between Indian and Afghanistan after a criminal's watch comes into his possession in 1893.

Jane Harris, The Observations (2006), about a young woman hired as a servant for an odd employer in nineteenth-century Scotland. Review

Jane Harris, Gillespie and I (2011), about an elderly spinster who recalls the story of a talented artist friend and the mysterious and disturbing events behind a criminal trial. Review at the Guardian

William Harrison, Burton and Speke (1982; titled The Mountains of the Moon in movie tie-in editions), about the expedition to Africa of Sir Richard Francis Burton and John Hanning Speke to find the source of the Nile.


Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Reckoning, a family saga set in 1916 England; #15 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Devil’s Horse, a family saga set in 1820 England; #16 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Poison Tree, a family saga set in 1831 England; #17 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Abyss, a family saga set in 1833 England; #18 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Hidden Shore, a family saga set in 1843 England; #19 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Winter Journey, a family saga set in 1851 England; #20 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Outcast, a family saga set in 1857 England and America; #21 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Mirage, a family saga set in 1870 England; #22 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Cause, a family saga set in 1874 England; #23 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Homecoming, a family saga set in 1885 England; #24 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Question, a family saga set in 1898 England; #25 in the Morland Dynasty series.


John Harwood, The Asylum (2013), about a woman confined in a mental asylum against her will who must search her memory in order to prove her true identity.

Philip Hensher, The Mulberry Empire, about the British invasion of Afghanistan in the 1830s. Review

Kate Hewitt, Far Horizons (2007), about a young man and woman in the Scottish Highlands who wish to marry but are separated when he goes to Canada to establish himself so he can gain her father's permission; first published under the pen name Katharine Swartz; #1 in the planned Emigrants trilogy.

Kate Hewitt, Another Country (2007), about two young women who meet aboard ship while voyaging to Boston in 1832; first published under the pen name Katharine Swartz; #2 in the planned Emigrants trilogy.


Georgette Heyer, Regency Buck (1935), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about two young women who, after their father's death, are chagrined to discover they have been made wards of a man not much older than they are.

Georgette Heyer, An Infamous Army (1937), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a beautiful young widow whose behavior leaves much to be desired amid the social whirl in Brussels as the Battle of Waterloo rages nearby; a sequel to Regency Buck that can be read as a stand-alone.

Georgette Heyer, The Corinthian (1938; also titled Beau Wyndham), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about two young people who meet by chance while both are fleeing from the prospect of unwanted marriages.

Georgette Heyer, Faro's Daughter (1941), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a young woman who manages a gaming house for her aunt but hopes to repair their reputations while fending off unwanted marriage proposals.

Georgette Heyer, Friday's Child (1944), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about an impetuous young man who, on being rejected by the woman he proposes to, vows to marry the next woman who crosses his path, who happens to be the impoverished girl who has adored him all her life.

Georgette Heyer, The Reluctant Widow (1946), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a woman who boards the wrong stagecoach and lands on the doorstep of a ruined estate, where she is persuaded to marry the dying heir.

Georgette Heyer, The Foundling (1948), a less romance-driven Regency about a wealthy young aristocrat about to dutifully enter an arranged marriage when he jumps at an unexpected chance to masquerade as a man without title or fortune.

Georgette Heyer, Arabella (1949), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a parson's daughter who, in a fit of pique, pretends to be an heiress who has no interest in the season's most eligible bachelor. Review

Georgette Heyer, The Grand Sophy (1950), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about an independent young woman who returns from her tour of the Continent and begins managing her relatives' lives, inspiring a plan to find her a husband.

Georgette Heyer, The Quiet Gentleman (1951), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a war hero and heir who returns home to his resentful stepmother and half-brother and faces as much peril at home as he did fighting in the Napoleonic Wars.

Georgette Heyer, Cotillion (1953), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a young woman whose miserly guardian tells her she must wed one of her cousins to inherit his fortune, or be left destitute. Review

Georgette Heyer, The Toll-Gate (1954), a Regency romance that is also a mystery, about a military officer who stumbles across a case of murder when he takes pity on a boy collecting tolls on a rainy night.

Georgette Heyer, Bath Tangle (1955), about the romantic dilemmas of two young woman, the spinster daughter and the young widow of a wealthy man whose estate is inherited by a nephew. Review

Georgette Heyer, Sprig Muslin (1956), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a long-bereaved bachelor who finally decides to marry out of duty and chooses an apparently unremarkable spinster.

Georgette Heyer, April Lady (1957), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about an inexperienced young wife who conceals her money-management problems from her husband.

Georgette Heyer, Sylvester; or the Wicked Uncle (1957), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a aristocrat looking for a wife who is startled when a young woman he assumed would be overjoyed by his interest reacts coolly.

Georgette Heyer, Venetia (1958), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a woman on the verge of spinsterhood who resolves never to marry except for love, despite the responsibilities she has taken on after her parents die.

Georgette Heyer, The Unknown Ajax (1959), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a young man spurned by his father's relatives because his mother is a commoner, who is suddenly accepted as heir when the previous heir dies.

Georgette Heyer, A Civil Contract (1961), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a plain heiress in love with an impoverished aristocrat who loves someone else.

Georgette Heyer, The Nonesuch (1962), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a governess struggling to restrain her beautiful but badly behaved charge as a pair of wealthy and eligible men arrive in their country village.

Georgette Heyer, False Colours (1963), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a man who impersonates his missing twin brother in order to please his mother by proposing to a young woman on his brother's behalf.

Georgette Heyer, Frederica (1965), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a young woman who sets out to persuade a titled distant cousin to sponsor her beautiful younger sister's debutante season in London.

Georgette Heyer, The Black Sheep (1966), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, a 28-year-old spinster who is impatient with the proprieties finds herself responsible for instilling them in her impetuous niece.

Georgette Heyer, Cousin Kate (1968), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about an innocent young woman who accepts an invitation to stay with an aunt who pressures her to marry her mentally disturbed cousin.

Georgette Heyer, Charity Girl (1970), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a viscount who encounters a naive young woman running away to find her grandfather, feels honor-bound to protect her from harm, and then must go to great lengths to protect both her and himself from social ruin.

Georgette Heyer, Lady of Quality (1972), classic Regency romance from the queen of the genre, about a spinster who enjoys her independence and a man with a notorious reputation.


Elizabeth Hickey, The Wayward Muse (2008), about the plain slum girl who became the model for the pre-Raphaelite artist Dante Gabriel Rosetti and married his protégé William Morris.

Jack Higgins, Pay the Devil, about a Confederate colonel who migrates to Ireland and becomes involved in the Fenian Rising.

Susan Hill, The Woman in Black (1983), a ghost story about a young solicitor who travels to an isolated house on a moor to settle an estate during the Christmas season and encounters sinister, supernatural events.

Pauline Holdstock, The Turning, about a nineteenth century French family whose lives are changed when an English ship is wrecked nearby.

Linda Holeman, The Linnet Bird, about the respectable wife of a British colonial officer in India haunted by her past as a London prostitute.

Sheri Holman, The Dress Lodger, a poor young woman struggles to keep a son with a birth defect alive in nineteenth century England.

Audrey Howard, The Flight of Swallows (2009), historical romance about a sixteen-year-old Yorkshire girl who marries a man she does not love in order to escape her cruel father.

Victor Hugo, The Toilers of the Sea, set on Guernsey Island in the nineteenth century.

Jane Jackson, Heart of Stone (2010), historical romance about an unwed mother who runs a granite quarry in 1840 Cornwall and appeals to a scarred, embittered former soldier for help when the disapproval of the local community threatens her business.


Anna Jacobs, The Trader's Wife (2011), about a young Englishwoman in the 1860s who agrees to marry a Singapore trader to help her employer expand his business connections; #1 in the Trader series.

Anna Jacobs, The Trader's Sister (2012), about a young Irishwoman whose dream is to escape her brutal father by joining her brother in Australia; #2 in the Trader series.

Anna Jacobs, The Trader's Dream (2013), about an Irishwoman who brings three orphaned children to Australia in the hope that a relative will adopt them; #3 in the Trader series.


Brenda Jagger, The Clouded Hills (1980; also titled Verity), about a young textile mills heiress in Yorkshire and her arranged marriage to her handsome cousin, a ruthless businessman, during the upheavals of the Industrial Revolution; #1 in the Barforth trilogy.

Brenda Jagger, Flint and Roses (1981; also titled The Barforth Women), about two families in nineteenth century Yorkshire amid the class tensions between the old landed gentry and the wealthy new industrialists in the textile business; #2 in the Barforth trilogy.

Brenda Jagger, The Sleeping Sword (1982; also titled An Independent Woman), about a well-educated young woman who marries into a dysfunctional family and struggles for independence; #3 in the Barforth trilogy.

Brenda Jagger, A Song Twice Over (1985), about two women in nineteenth century Yorkshire, an industrialist's daughter and an Irish immigrant, who are in love with the same man, who devotes his life to improving conditions for factory workers.

Brenda Jagger, Distant Choices (1986), about two young half-sisters, one legitimate, the other illegitimate, who fall in love with the same man in mid-nineteenth century Yorkshire.


Eloisa James, This Duke Is Mine (2012), a Regency romance about twin sisters betrothed to dukes; based on the fairy tale "The Princess and the Pea."

Syrie James, The Secret Diaries of Charlotte Brontë (2009), about the novelist Charlotte Brontë and her romance with Arthur Bell Nichols.

Syrie James, Dracula, My Love (2010), a reimagining of the Dracula story in the form of Mina Harker's secret journals about her love affair with the count.

Janette Jenkins, Little Bones (2012), about a young crippled girl, abandoned by her family, who becomes the assistant to an unlicensed doctor whose clientele are actresses.

Ken Kalfus, Equilateral (2013), about a British astronomer and his disaster-plagued effort to dig a huge perfect triangle in the Egyptian desert in order to communicate with the planet Mars in the late nineteenth century.

Mary Pat Kelly, Galway Bay (2009), about an Irish family who decide to emigrate to America during the potato famine.

Sean Kenny, The Hungry Earth (1995), a modern Irishman travels back in time to the Great Famine.


Garry Douglas Kilworth, The Devil's Own, about a British soldier from the upper classes who enlists in the ranks instead of buying a commission; set during the nineteenth century Crimean War; #1 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.

Garry Douglas Kilworth, The Valley of Death, about a British soldier from the upper classes who enlists in the ranks instead of buying a commission; set during the nineteenth century Crimean War; #2 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.

Garry Douglas Kilworth, Soldiers in the Mist, about a British soldier from the upper classes who enlists in the ranks instead of buying a commission; set during the nineteenth century Crimean War; #3 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.

Garry Douglas Kilworth, The Winter Soldiers (2004), about a British soldier from the upper classes who enlists in the ranks instead of buying a commission; set during the nineteenth century Crimean War; #4 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.

Garry Douglas Kilworth, Attack on the Redan (2004), about a British soldier from the upper classes who enlists in the ranks instead of buying a commission; set during the nineteenth century Crimean War; #5 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.

Garry Douglas Kilworth, Brothers of the Blade, about a British soldier from the upper classes who enlists in the ranks instead of buying a commission; set in nineteenth century India; #6 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.

Garry Douglas Kilworth, Rogue Officer (2007), about a British soldier abducted and accused of desertion before he can get back to his unit, just as the Indian Mutiny is coming to an end; #7 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.

Garry Douglas Kilworth, Kiwi Wars (2008), about a British officer sent to New Zealand in 1860 to set up a spy network among the Maori, who are in revolt; #8 in the "Fancy Jack" Crossman series.


Peg Kingman, Not Yet Drown'd, about a Scottish woman who travels to India in search of her twin brother in 1822.

Rudyard Kipling, Kim (1901), about the orphaned son of an Irish soldier who grows up as a street urchin in India and is recruited as a spy in the "Great Game" of the British to control central Asia.

Rudyard Kipling, The Man Who Would Be King and Other Stories (1888 for The Man Who Would Be King), a collection of short stories; the title story is about a pair of nineteenth century British adventurers who scheme to become kings in Afghanistan.


Lisa Kleypas, Secrets of a Summer Night (2005), historical romance about a beautiful and charming young woman in Victorian England who is a wallflower because she lacks a dowry; #1 in the Wallflower series.

Lisa Kleypas, It Happened One Autumn (2005), historical romance about a young American heiress whose independent ways are disapproved in Victorian England, especially by the man she falls for; #2 in the Wallflower series.

Lisa Kleypas, The Devil in Winter (2006), historical romanceabout a shy young woman due to receive a large inheritance who marries a rake on the condition they remain celibate, in order to foil her scheming relatives; #3 in the Wallflower series.

Lisa Kleypas, Scandal in Spring (2006), historical romance about a young woman who fails to snare a husband three years in a row and is given an ultimatum by her father; #4 in the Wallflower series.

Lisa Kleypas, A Wallflower Christmas (2008), about a good-looking American man who comes to London to court a bride from an aristocratic family but needs help adjusting to English manners; #5 in the Wallflower series.


Matthew Kneale, Sweet Thames (1992), about a young engineer in 1849 as a cholera epidemic threatens who dreams of redesigning London's sewers to clean up the city and its river.

Sheila Kohler, Becoming Jane Eyre (2009), a biographical novel about Charlotte Brontë, the author of Jane Eyre, and her family.

Emery Lee, Fortune’s Son (2011), historical romance about a gambler whose effort at reform is thwarted and a woman who has renounced love but wants him to teach her how to win at cards.

Jacqueline Lepore, Descent Into Dust (2010), a gothic fantasy novel about a young woman who visits a remote manor house on the moors and discovers she is destined to be a vampire hunter.

Nell Leyshon, The Colour of Milk (2012), about a farm girl who in 1831 goes to work for the invalid wife of a vicar and then, as she learns to read and write, struggles to tell her story.


Johanna Lindsey, The Heir (2000), historical romance about a newly minted aristocrat who discovers his station in life requires him to marry a woman he dislikes rather than the woman he finds entrancing; #1 in the Reid Family series.

Johanna Lindsey, The Devil Who Tamed Her (2007), historical romance about a beautiful woman who, having spurned the man she was engaged to marry, finds that her parents have arranged her (carefully chaperoned) kidnapping by a man who vows he can tame her sharp tongue and make her marriageable; #2 in the Reid Family series.

Johanna Lindsey, A Rogue of My Own (2009), historical romance about a woman appointed a maid of honor in Queen Victoria's court who is forced into marriage with a reluctant suitor after he seduces her and she becomes pregnant; #3 in the Reid Family series.

David Liss, The Twelfth Enchantment (2011), historical fantasy about a young woman whose father's death forces her to live with her tyrannical uncle until the notorious poet Lord Byron arrives with a cryptic message for her.

David Lodge, A Man of Parts (2011), about the aging author H.G. Wells looking back on his life and his relationships.


Norah Lofts, Michael and All Angels (1943; also titled The Golden Fleece), about a landlord in 1817 England and his two very different daughters.

Norah Lofts, Jassy (1944), about the friendship that develops after a girl who seems to have mysterious powers moves into a house that a neighbor boy has long admired.

Norah Lofts, To See a Fine Lady (1946), about a dairy maid who chooses a life of financial security over a marriage for love that she fears would lead to a life of poverty.

Norah Lofts, A Calf for Venus (1949; also titled Letty), about a young doctor and a new serving girl at a disreputable coffee house.

Norah Lofts, Lovers All Untrue (1970), romantic suspense set in Victorian England about a young woman struggling to escape from her dominating father's control.

Norah Lofts, Charlotte (1972; also titled Out of the Dark), about a young schoolteacher from Cornwall who goes to teach at a school run by a suspicious headmistress, where a favorite student dies and she begins to wonder whether she may have been responsible.

Norah Lofts, Gad's Hall (1977), about a modern-day woman who moves into an old house with her family and begins to have supernatural experiences that hearken back to the terrible secret of the people who lived there in the 1840s; available with The Haunting of Gad's Hall in a single edition.

Norah Lofts, The Haunting of Gad's Hall (1978; also titled Haunted House), about a nineteenth-century family with four daughters, one of whom dabbles in the occult, bringing a mysterious evil to the house that cannot be banished until a century later; companion novel to Gad's Hall; available with Gad's Hall in a single edition.

Norah Lofts, The Day of the Butterfly (1979), a Regency romance about a young woman who seems doomed to the life of a prostitute after being fired from her nursemaid job, until an artist asks her to model for him.


Claire Lorrimer, The Chatelaine (1978), a family saga about a woman who marries at seventeen and is happy to become the chatelaine of a manor house until she realizes the true nature of her cruel, greedy husband; #1 in the Rochford Trilogy.

Claire Lorrimer, The Wilderling (1982), a family saga about a woman restored to her rightful family only to be betrayed by her father; #2 in the Rochford Trilogy.

Claire Lorrimer, Fool's Curtain (1994), about a family whose fortune is lost in the Wall Street Crash; #3 in the Rochford Trilogy.


Elizabeth Ludwig, No Safe Harbor (2012), about an Irish woman who travels to America in 1896 in search of her brother and falls in love with a man who may be dangerous; Christian message; #1 in the planned Edge of Freedom series.


Jonathan Lunn, Killigrew R.N., about an officer in the British Royal Navy who risks his life to help stop the illegal slave trade; #1 in the Killigrew series.

Jonathan Lunn, Killigrew and the Golden Dragon, about an officer in the British Royal Navy on a mission against Chinese pirates; #2 in the Killigrew series.

Jonathan Lunn, Killigrew and the Incorrigibles, about an officer in the British Royal Navy on a mission in the Pacific Ocean; #3 in the Killigrew series.

Jonathan Lunn, Killigrew and the Northwest Passage, about an officer in the British Royal Navy on a mission to find a sea passage through the Arctic from the Atlantic to the Pacific; #4 in the Killigrew series.

Jonathan Lunn, Killigrew's Run, about an officer in the British Royal Navy on the eve of the nineteenth century Crimean War; #5 in the Killigrew series.

Jonathan Lunn, Killigrew and the Sea Devil, about an officer in the British Royal Navy on a mission involving espionage in nineteenth century Russia; #6 in the Killigrew series.


Paul Lynch, Red Sky In Morning (2013), about an Irish farmer who kills a landlord in 1832 and flees to America.

Rose Macaulay, Told by an Idiot (1923), about the family of a British clergyman whose faith is perpetually in crisis and their lives from the late 1870s into the 1920s.

R.A. MacAvoy, The Grey Horse, historical fantasy about a horse who becomes a man; set in late nineteenth century Ireland during the risings against the English.


Malcolm MacDonald, The World From Rough Stones (1974), about a railroad foreman and the equally poor young woman he marries who begin an ambitious climb toward wealth; #1 in the Stevenson Family Saga.

Malcolm MacDonald, The Rich Are with You Always (1976), about a couple whose climb toward wealth is threatened by the behavior of their friends, a pious woman and her sex-crazed husband; #2 in the Stevenson Family Saga.

Malcolm MacDonald, Sons of Fortune (1978), about the four eldest children in a wealthy family, who rebel against their father's strict approach to life; #4 in the Stevenson Family Saga.

Malcolm MacDonald, Abigail (1979), about a wealthy young woman and her discovery of sex during the outwardly repressed Victorian era; #4 in the Stevenson Family Saga.

Malcolm MacDonald, Rose of Nancemellin (2001), about a Cornish lady's maid who loses her job when she impersonates the master's daughter and goes on to a career on the stage.


Walter Macken, The Silent People (1962), about a young Irishman who has to leave his rural town during the famine of 1826 after he gets into an argument with the landlord's son.

Sarah MacLean, Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake (2010), historical romance about a 28-year-old spinster heiress who decides to recklessly break society's rules and flings herself at the man to whom she has long been attracted.

Verna MacLean, Farewell Rhilochan (2004), about the Highland Clearances of the early nineteenth century, when Scottish Highlanders were forced from their homes.

Anne Mallory, Three Nights of Sin (2008), historical romance about a young woman who, to save her brother from the gallows, agrees to do three favors for a mysterious stranger.

Mathias Malzieu, The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart (2009), whimsical historical fantasy set in 1874 Edinburgh about a young man with a clock for a heart; written by a French rock star.


Benjamin Markovits, Imposture (2007), about a doctor dismissed from the service of Lord Byron who falls in love with a young woman who is under the impression he is Byron; #1 in the Byron trilogy.

Benjamin Markovits, A Quiet Adjustment (2008), about the romantic triangle among Lord Byron, his sister and Lady Annabella Milbanke; #2 in the Byron trilogy.

Benjamin Markovits, Childish Loves (2011), about a man who inherits unpublished manuscripts about Lord Byron from a friend and tries to revive his literary career by writing about his friend; #3 in the Byron trilogy.


Rebecca Mascull, The Visitors (2014), about a deaf, blind girl in Victorian England who learns to communicate with a hop-picker on her father's farm and later travels to South Africa during the Boer War, where she learns the truth about the spirits she communicates with in her mind.

Daniel Mason, The Piano Tuner (2002), a London piano tuner travels to Burma in 1886.

Liam McAuley, The Musicians (2010), about two Irish boys, ages 12 and 11, who travel to the U.S. in 1846 and serve as drummer boys in the Mexican War; self-published.

Eugene McCabe, Death and Nightingales, about a Protestant landlord and his Catholic stepdaughter during the strife in Ireland in 1883 after the murder of the British Chief Secretary for Ireland.

Roger McDonald, Mr Darwin's Shooter (1999), about Syms Covington, the young sailor befriended by Charles Darwin when they meet aboard the Beagle, who assists in shooting animal specimens in the Galapagos Islands, and is later troubled by the implications of Darwin's theory of evolution.

Bernie McGill, The Butterfly Cabinet (2010), about the mistress of an Irish manor house, imprisoned in 1892 after her only daughter dies, and the servant woman who many years later tells her story to a young woman.

Betty McInnes, The Longest Journey (2010), about a Scottish woman in 1848 whose son is sentenced to exile in Australia while she tries to hide a secret about her past.

Katharine McMahon, The Rose of Sebastopol (2007), about two young Englishwomen who take separate paths from Victorian London to the ravaged battlefields of the Crimean War, one dedicated to nursing the wounded, the other to finding and caring for her army surgeon fiance after she learns he has fallen ill.

Elisabeth McNeill, The Storm (2007), about the widows in a fishing village on the Scottish coast after their community is devastated by a storm in 1881.

Elisabeth McNeill, Turn of the Tide (2008), about the women of a fishing village on the Scottish coast and their continued efforts to rebuild their lives after a devastating storm; sequel to The Storm.

Doreen McNicol, Rachel Wicks (2011), about a young woman who grew up in a Victorian workhouse but marries a wealthy gentleman, and the cruelty she experiences from her husband, his family and the staff of his mansion.

Jean Mead, The Widow Makers (2005), about a family which moves from the Lancashire coal fields in search of a better life in the North Wales slate quarries; #1 in the Widow Makers series.

Jean Mead, Strife (2011), about a family in which the father's efforts to start a union for quarry workers are opposed by his wealthy son; #2 in the Widow Makers series.

Valerie Mendes, Larkswood (2011), about a young woman sent to her family's old mansion in 1939 to recuperate from an illness, where she discovers clues to tragic events in 1896 that divided her family.

Patrick Mercer, To Do and Die (2009), about a British officer fighting in the Crimean War.

Patrick Mercer, Red Runs the Helmand (2011), about a newly appointed British general who arrives in Afghanistan as a young Afghan prince sets out to remove the British from power during the Second Anglo-Afghan War in the 1870s.

James A. Michener, The Journey, about four English aristocrats and their Irish servant who cope with disaster as they search for gold in 1897 Canada.

Jean Jardine Miller, The Family History (2008), about a modern Canadian widow whose research uncovers the story of an ancestor in Victorian London who was also a widow; self-published.

Susanna Moore, One Last Look, about the experiences of two English sisters and their brother in 1836 Calcutta, where he is serving as governor-general.

Jude Morgan, Indiscretion (2006), a romantic comedy about a young woman whose well-meaning but hapless father arranges for her to become the companion of a wealthy widow after he loses all their money.

Jude Morgan, Charlotte and Emily (2009; titled The Taste of Sorrow in the U.K.), about novelists Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë and their family. Review or Author Interview

Jude Morgan, A Little Folly (2010), a Regency romance about a brother and sister who finally escape their father's stifling influence when he dies, when the brother embarks on an affair with a married woman, and the sister rejects the man her father wanted her to marry.

Nancy Moser, How Do I Love Thee? (2009), about poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning, who was an invalid and recluse oppressed by her controlling father until her future husband Robert came into her life.

Margaret Muir, Floating Gold (2010), a seafaring adventure about a British naval captain sent on an Atlantic mission in 1802.

Margaret Muir, The Condor's Feather (2010), about a young Englishwoman who travels to Patagonia in 1885 and embarks on a riding expedition across the Pampas, where her party struggles to survive threats from escaped prisoners, hostile Indians and dangerous wildlife.

Janet Mullany, A Most Lamentable Comedy (2009), a Regency romance about a young widow who sets her sights on a handsome gentleman without realizing he is as penniless as she is.

Lilian Nattel, Singing Fire (2005), a novel with a touch of magical realism about two immigrant women in London, one in the East End Jewish ghetto and the other in the wealthy West End, and the child who brings them together.

Marina Julia Neary, Wynfield's Kingdom (2009), about a boy from the London slums who is taken in by a disgraced physician.

Marina Julia Neary, Wynfield's War (2010), about a young man from the London slums who becomes a soldier in the Crimean War.

Elizabeth Newark, Jane Eyre's Daughter (2008), about the daughter of Jane Eyre; a sequel to Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre.

Elle Newmark, The Sandalwood Tree (2011), about a historian who travels to Delhi with his wife and son in 1947 as British rule in India comes to an end, where his wife finds 90-year-old letters in a wall of their house and decides to unravel the story behind them.

Kate Noble, Compromised (2008), a Regency romance about the less beautiful of two sisters whose wit and spirit nevertheless attract the viscount engaged to marry her sister.

Kate Noble, Revealed (2009), a Regency romance about a beauty whose rivalry with another woman over the attentions of a marquis causes her to stumble upon the identity of a famous spy.

Joseph O’Connor, The Star of the Sea (2002), about the conflicts among the passengers on a ship sailing from Ireland to New York during the Potato Famine years; a sequel, Redemption Falls, is listed in the Civil War section of the 19th Century America page.

Liam O’Flaherty, Famine, about tenant farmers in County Galway, Ireland, during the nineteenth century potato famine.

Jean-Pierre Ohl, Mr. Dick; Or, The Tenth Book (2008), about a modern French journalist who discovers a memoir describing the final days of English novelist Charles Dickens.

Pamela Oldfield, The Birthday Present (2010), about a London singer offered an unusually large sum to perform at a private birthday party in 1890.

Patricia O'Reilly, A Type of Beauty: The Story of Kathleen Newton (2010), about the London beauty who created a scandal by becoming the mistress of the French artist Jacques Tissot.

Lauren Owen, The Quick (2014), historical fantasy about a poet and his sister and a mysterious society of wealthy men in a London stalked by vampires in 1892.

Jeremy Page, The Collector of Lost Things (2013), about a naturalist who joins an 1845 Arctic expedition in search of the Great Auk, a bird which may already have been hunted to extinction.

Charles Palliser, Rustication (2013), about a Cambridge student sent home to the run-down mansion where his recently impoverished mother and sister live, when a series of disturbing crimes begin in the area. Review

David Park, The Poets' Wives (2014), about the wives of nineteenth-century English poet William Blake, early twentieth-century Russian poet Osip Mandelstam, and a fictional Irish poet of the present, and the sacrifices they make for their husbands.

Una-Mary Parker, The Fairbairn Girls (2013), about an aristocratic family in Argyllshire that in 1891 falls victim to a curse.

Glenn Patterson, The Mill For Grinding Old People Young (2012), about an elderly man recalling his life in Belfast, Ireland, in 1830s and beyond, and his love affair with a Polish exile.

Matthew Pearl, The Last Dickens (2009), a thriller about Charles Dickens's American publisher's efforts to find and publish the end of his unfinished last novel, despite murderous opposition.

Nicky Penttila, An Untitled Lady (2013), Regency romance about a young woman who weds a Manchester merchant in 1819 and discovers his business is putting weavers like her birth father out of work.

Mary Hart Perry, The Wild Princess (2012), about Queen Victoria's free-spirited daughter Princess Louise.

Arthur Phillips, Angelica, in 1880s London, a mother consults a spiritualist after seeing a spectral figure attack her daughter.

Jill Pitkeathley, Dearest Cousin Jane (2010), about the flirtatious and free-spirited Countess Eliza de Feuillide, a cousin of Jane Austen, who comes to England after her husband is guillotined during the French Revolution.

Matthew Plampin, The Street Philosopher (2009), about a journalist who becomes a gossip columnist ("street philosopher") on his return from the Crimean War in an unsuccessful effort to forget the horrors he saw there.

Jem Poster, Courting Shadows (2008), about a young architect and his conflicts with the villagers when he takes on a restoration job for a neglected country church and decides to clear out elements he considers superstitious and unsound.

Christopher Priest, The Prestige, magical realism about a stage magician in the late nineteenth century.

Kate Pullinger, The Mistress of Nothing (2009), about Sally Naldrett, the lady's maid who accompanied Lucie Duff Gordon to Egypt. Review

Arthur Quiller-Couch and Daphne du Maurier, Castle Dor (1976), about a Breton onion-seller and a recently wed woman in nineteenth-century Cornwall who are compelled to relive the experiences of their past lives as Tristan and Isolde; begun by Arthur Quiller-Couch and completed by Daphne du Maurier after his death.

Julia Quinn, A Night Like This (2012), historical romance about a governess who knows she should not flirt with the nobleman who attracts her.

Julian Rathbone, A Very English Agent, about a man who has been a police spy for the past 40 years and wants a pension badly enough to use blackmail; #1 in the Charlie Boylan series.

Julian Rathbone, Birth of a Nation, a man who has been a police spy for the past 40 years tells about his adventures in the Galapagos and America; #2 in the Charlie Boylan series.

Julian Rathbone, The Mutiny, about a British spy who becomes personally involved in a conspiracy in India; #3 in the Charlie Boylan series.

Deanna Raybourn, The Dead Travel Fast (2010), historical fantasy about a free-spirited Scottish spinster who goes to stay in a decrepit castle in Transylvania in 1858 and becomes involved with its disturbingly magnetic owner, Count Andrei Dragulescu.

Douglas Reeman, Badge of Glory, about a young man serving in the Royal Marines in 1850, in Africa and then the Crimean War; #1 in the Royal Marines Saga.

Douglas Reeman, The Horizon, about a young man serving in the Royal Marines during the Boxer Rebellion; #2 in the Royal Marines Saga; for later novels in this series, see the WWI and WWII pages.

Rachel Florence Roberts, The Medea Complex (2013), about a woman kidnapped and committed to a lunatic asylum in 1885.

Katie Roiphe, Still She Haunts Me (2001), about Charles Dodgson, who wrote Alice in Wonderland and published it under the pen name Lewis Carroll, and his relationship with his young muse Alice Liddell and her family.

Meg Rosoff, The Bride's Farewell (2009), about a young woman in rural England during the 1850s who understands horses better than people and flees to the Salisbury Fair instead of marrying her childhood sweetheart.

Frances Sands, Daughters of Hunger (2008), about a woman who dies of malnutrition during the Irish Potato Famine and her daughters and granddaughters over the course of 150 years.

Anthony Sattin, Winter on the Nile (2010), a novel about 29-year-old Florence Nightingale's 1849 trip to Egypt, which portrays her meeting the young future author Gustave Flaubert and finding the courage to decide on a career in nursing.

Graham Sclater, Hatred is the Key (2010), about the Dartmoor Depot, originally built to hold 3,000 French prisoners, where 10,000 Americans from the War of 1812 were housed in terrible conditions even after the war ended; self-published.

Gavin Scott, The Adventures of Toby Wey (2009), about the farm boy who rescued Charles Dickens from child labor, operated a chess-playing machine, and played a role in developing the first public railway; self-published.

Susan Sellers, Vanessa and Virginia (2009), about the relationship between novelist Virginia Woolf and her sister Vanessa Bell from Vanessa's perspective.

Diane Setterfield, Bellman and Black (2013), about a man whose childhood killing of a rook begins to haunt him after tragedy strikes his family and he makes a bargain with a stranger.

Miranda Seymour, Count Manfred, about a woman who becomes engaged to the mysterious tenant of a mansion belonging to Lord Byron.

Jacqueline Sheehan, Now and Then (2009), about a modern woman who wakes up one morning to find herself among her ancestors in 1844 Ireland.

Sara Sheridan, The Secret Mandarin (forthcoming in Sept. 2009 in the U.K. only), about Robert Fortune, a British botanist who brought tea plants from China to India in the course of his work as a spy for the British in China.

George Shipway, The Chilian Club, about a group of retired British army officers who decide to redeem the honor of their disgraced regiment by assassinating union leaders and other leftists.

George Shipway, Free Lance, about two English friends who join the East India Company.

George Shipway, Strangers in the Land, about a well-meaning but ignorant English general, newly arrived in India, whose seemingly minor changes in the regulations result in disaster.

Enid Shomer, The Twelve Rooms of the Nile (2012), a novel which imagines that on her trip to Egypt in 1850, twenty-nine-year-old Florence Nightingale met Gustave Flaubert and shared a passionate friendship with him that changed both their lives. Review

Eve Silver, Dark Desires, gothic romance set in London during the 1820s.

Eve Silver, His Dark Kiss, gothic romance set in Wales during the 1820s.

Eve Silver, Dark Prince, gothic romance set on the coast of Cornwall during the 1820s.

Eve Silver, His Wicked Sins, gothic romance set in Yorkshire during the 1820s.

Cheryl Simani, The Cornerstone of Deception (2012), about British archaeologist Sir Henry C. Rawlinson and his work in the Middle East from 1849 to 1876; self-published.

Dan Simmons, Drood (2009), a horror novel about the final years of author Charles Dickens. Review

Gillian Slovo, An Honourable Man (2011), about a British doctor and his wife who are separated when he volunteers for an 1884 expedition to Khartoum to rescue General Gordon.

Anna Small, In the Arms of an Earl (2013), historical romance about a shy bookworm who marries a composer who later inherits an earldom, creating social pressures that make her life difficult.

Susan Squires, The Burning (2006), a vampire romance set in 1821 England.

Wesley Stace, Misfortune (2005), about an orphaned boy raised as a girl by a befuddled lord in nineteenth century England.

Charlotte St. George, The Wheel of Fortune (2012), about a young English woman forced into an unhappy marriage which results in scandal; self-published.

Sara Stockbridge, Cross My Palm (2011), about a shy young girl in high society London and the fortune-teller who reads her palm but keeps a secret of the ill-fortune she sees in it.

Irving Stone, The Origin (1980), a biographical novel about Charles Darwin, who pioneered the concept of evolution after his voyage of discovery on The Beagle.

Rebecca Stott, The Coral Thief (2008), about a Scottish medical student and the beautiful young woman who steals from him when they share a stagecoach while traveling to Paris in 1815 in the wake of Napoleoon's defeat.


V.A. Stuart, The Valiant Sailors, about a nineteenth century First Lieutenant in the British Navy who must cope with a despotic and possibly insane ship captain; #1 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Brave Captains, about a British naval officer fighting on the plains of Balaclava during the Charge of the Light Brigade; #2 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Hazard's Command, about a British naval officer during the Crimean War; #3 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Hazard of Huntress, about a newly promoted ship captain in the British navy sent to spy on the Russians during the Crimean War; #4 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Hazard in Circassia, about a British naval officer sent to negotiate an alliance with the mountain-dwelling Circassians during the Crimean War; #5 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Victory at Sebastopol, about a British naval officer during the Crimean War who faces court martial after making a difficult choice during the press of warfare; #6 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Guns to the Far East, about a British naval officer in China after the Crimean War who learns his sisters may be in danger during the Sepoy Mutiny; #7 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Escape from Hell, about a British naval officer who volunteers to help rescue a besieged British garrison during the Sepoy Mutiny; #8 in the Phillip Hazard series.

V.A. Stuart, Victors and Lords, about a British captain in the East India Company during the Crimean War; #1 in the Alexander Sheridan series.

V.A. Stuart, The Sepoy Mutiny, about a British officer in India during the Sepoy Mutiny; #2 in the Alexander Sheridan series.


Harry Thompson, This Thing of Darkness (2005; titled To the Edge of the World in the U.S. and published as a trilogy), about the manic-depressive, devoutly Christian captain of the Beagle, the ship that brought Charles Darwin to the Galapagos.

Sandi Toksvig, Valentine Grey (2012), about a woman who disguises herself as a man to fight in the Boer War in the place of her homosexual cousin.

Christine Trent, By the King’s Design, (2012), historical romance about a woman who travels from Yorkshire to London to ask Parliament's help after Luddites destroy her cloth milling machine, and meets a young cabinet maker there.

Carrie Turansky, The Governess of Highland Hall (2013), about the daughter of missionaries who must return from India to England, where she becomes governess on an estate in financial trouble; Christian message.

Leon Uris, Trinity (1976), a saga of four families beginning in the time of the Irish Potato Famine.

Wendy Wallace, The Painted Bridge (2012), about a sane woman whose husband has her committed to an insane asylum near London in 1859.

Wendy Wallace, The Sacred River (2013), about an invalid in Victorian London who travels to Egypt with her mother and aunt on the eve of an Egyptian revolt.

Sarah Waters, Affinity, about a women’s prison in Victorian London.

Sarah Waters, Fingersmith, an orphan girl grows up among a family of petty thieves in nineteenth century London. Review

Sarah Waters, Tipping the Velvet, about a woman who impersonates men on the stage in Victorian London.

Katherine Webb, The Misbegotten (2013), about a governess who marries a wine merchant and moves to Bath, where she meets a former soldier haunted by his memories of the Napoleonic Wars whose childhood sweetheart disappeared and was never found.

Deborah Weisgall, The World Before Her (2008), about the nineteenth century British novelist Marian Evans, who wrote under the pen name George Eliot, and a twentieth century woman sculptor, both of whom spend their honeymoons in Venice.


Fay Weldon, Habits of the House (2013), about a London aristocrat in financial trouble in 1899 and his plan to secure a wealthy Chicago woman as his son's bride; #1 in the Habits of the House trilogy.

Fay Weldon, Long Live the King (2013), about the family and servants of an English earl at the close of 1901; #2 in the Habits of the House trilogy.

Fay Weldon, The New Countess (2013), about the masters and servants on a grand estate as they prepare for a visit from King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra; #3 in the Habits of the House trilogy.


Paul West, The Women of Whitechapel and Jack the Ripper, about the infamous murders in Victorian London.

Charles Gidley Wheeler, The Believer (1985), about a nineteenth-century man's journey from legal scholar to businessman to grimly rigid adherent of a Christian sect, the Plymouth Brethren.

Anne Whitfield, The House of Women (2011), about a young woman who sacrifices her own possibility of happiness so she can protect her six younger sisters from her violent, tyrannical father.

Anne Whitfield, Her Shadowed Heart (2008), about a troubled young Yorkshire woman who believes her mother hates her, and learns the reason for her coldness only after falling in love with a man who owns a mining business in South America.


John Wilcox, The Horns of the Buffalo (2004), about a young British officer in Africa during the 1879 Zulu war; #1 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, The Road to Kandahar (2005), about a young British officer during the 1880 Afghanistan campaign; #2 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, The Diamond Frontier (2006), about a young British officer in South Africa during the late nineteenth century; #3 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, Last Stand at Majuba Hill (2007), about a young British officer in Africa during the late nineteenth century; #4 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, The Guns of El Kebir (2008), about a young British officer in Egypt during the late nineteenth century; #5 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, Siege at Khartoum (2009), about a young British officer on an urgent mission to Khartoum to rescue a general besieged by a band of religious warriors; #6 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, The Shangani Patrol (2010), about a British officer who, while held captive by an African tribal leader in 1893, discovers a Portuguese plot to undermine the treaty between the tribe and Cecil Rhodes, Africa's richest man; #7 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, The War of the Dragon Lady (2012), about a former British officer and his wife caught up in the Boxer Rebellion when they visit her missionary uncle in China; #8 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, Fire Across The Veldt (2013), about a former British officer reinstated as the colonel of a cavalry unit as the Boer conflict continues in 1900; #9 in the Simon Fonthill series.

John Wilcox, Bayonets along the Border (2014), about a former Army scout who, while traveling in India, is asked to deliver an important letter, amid dangerous unrest; #10 in the Simon Fonthill series.


Niall Williams, The Fall of Light, about four brothers during the nineteenth century Irish Famine.

Geoffrey Wilson, Land of Hope and Glory (2011), alternative history/fantasy about a man who becomes the leader of a rebellion against the Indian rulers of England; #1 in the Land of Hope and Glory series.

Geoffrey Wilson, The Place of Dead Kings (2013), alternative history/fantasy about a man's quest for a weapon that will free England from rule by India; #2 in the Land of Hope and Glory series.

James Wilson, Consolation (2008), about an Edwardian author of children's books whose life and marriage begin to fall apart after the death of his baby daughter.

Sandra Wilson, Lady Jane's Ribbons (2009), historical romance about a young woman who sets out to win a stagecoach race in 1820.

Val Wood, The Harbour Girl (2011), about a sixteen-year-old Scarborough girl in the 1880s who mends fishing nets and must marry her lover after she becomes pregnant, but soon discovers she has made a serious mistake.

Val Wood, His Brother’s Wife (2013), about a woman who in 1860 accepts a marriage proposal from a stranger in order to stay out of the workhouse.

Geoff Woodland, The Triangle Trade (2013), about a Liverpool slave trader's son who speaks out against the slave trade in 1804, as momentum builds toward the British Trade Act of 1807 which would end it.

Janet Woods, The Coal Gatherer, about a friendship between women of different social backgrounds in Victorian England.

Janet Woods, Lady Lightfingers (2011), historical romance about an educated girl from the London slums who must survive as a pickpocket and steals from a man who becomes intrigued by her.

Sally Zigmond, Hope Against Hope (2009), about two sisters whose lives are disrupted after they are forced to sell their pub to make way for a railroad, when one ends up in a high-class brothel, the other in a boarding house where she is preyed on by the landlady's son.


Mysteries and Thrillers: 19th Century Britain

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Tasha Alexander, And Only to Deceive (2005), about a young widow who discovers how interesting her husband was only after his death and, while learning more about his interest in ancient Greece, stumbles across a dangerous secret involving stolen Greek artifacts; #1 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series.

Tasha Alexander, A Poisoned Season (2007), about a young widow being stalked by a cat-burglar who has been stealing treasures that once belonged to Marie Antoinette; #2 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series.

Tasha Alexander, A Fatal Waltz (2008), about a young widow whose friend's husband is arrested on the accusation of murdering a nobleman during a party; #3 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series.

Tasha Alexander, Tears of Pearl (2009), about a bride who, during her honeymoon in the Ottoman Empire, is asked to help investigate the murder of one of the Sultan's numerous wives; #4 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series. Review

Tasha Alexander, Dangerous to Know (2010), about a young wife traumatized by an encounter with a murderer, who when sent to recuperate at her mother-in-law's estate in Normandy encounters a killer who resembles Jack the Ripper; #5 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series.

Tasha Alexander, A Crimson Warning (2011), about about a young wife who, with her husband's assistance, tries to find out who is terrorizing London's upper crust by revealing their scandalous secrets; #6 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series.

Tasha Alexander, Death in the Floating City (2012), about about a young wife who rushes to Venice with her husband to help out a former schoolmate she heartily disliked when the woman's husband is murdered; #7 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series.

Tasha Alexander, Behind the Shattered Glass (2013), about a woman who investigates the murder of the man who lives next to the Darbyshire estate where she and her husband live; #8 in the Lady Emily Ashton mystery series.


Malcolm Archibald, Pryde's Rock (2006), about a young engineer sent to the coast of Northumberland in 1803 to persuade a landowner to build a lighthouse after a rash of fatal shipwrecks; #1 in the Matthew Pryde series.

Malcolm Archibald, Pryde and the Infernal Device (2008), about an engineer sent to France as a spy to find out whether the French are digging a tunnel under the English Channel, as rumors suggest; #2 in the Matthew Pryde series.


David Ashton, Shadow of the Serpent (2006), about a police inspector in Victorian Edinburgh who feels compelled to investigate the murder of a prostitute in the midst of an election scandal; #1 in the Inspector McLevy mystery series.

David Ashton, Fall From Grace (2007), about a police inspector in Victorian Edinburgh who investigates a murder at the home of the man who built the ill-fated Tay Bridge; #2 in the Inspector McLevy mystery series.

David Ashton, A Trick of the Light (2009), about a police inspector in Victorian Edinburgh who gets help from Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, as he tries to solve the murder of a Confederate officer in 1860 Edinburgh; #3 in the Inspector McLevy mystery series.


Elizabeth Bailey, The Gilded Shroud (2011), about a young woman who encounters a murder only she can solve after she accepts a job as a lady's companion and the lady's daughter-in-law is found strangled to death; #1 in the Lady Fan mystery series.

Elizabeth Bailey, The Deathly Portent (2012), about a new bride who investigates the murder of a blacksmith after she and her husband are stranded near a small village when their coach's axle breaks; #2 in the Lady Fan mystery series.


T.F. Banks, The Thief Taker (2001), a mystery about a Bow Street Runner investigating the death of a respectable gentleman who had been seen at very unrespectable taverns; #1 in the Memoirs of a Bow Street Runner series.

T.F. Banks, The Emperor's Assassin (2003), a mystery about a Bow Street Runner investigating the murder of a count's French mistress amid impassioned controversies over the fate of the defeated Napoleon; #2 in the Memoirs of a Bow Street Runner series.

Stephanie Barron, A Flaw in the Blood (2008), a stand-alone mystery exploring the possibility that Queen Victoria's husband, Prince Albert, may have committed suicide or been murdered.

Gyles Brandreth, Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance (titled Oscar Wilde and the Candlelight Murders in the U.K.) (2008), a mystery in which the famous London playwright and witty man-about-town discovers the body of a murdered boy and sets out to find the killer with the help of his friend Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes; #1 in the Oscar Wilde mystery series.

Gyles Brandreth, Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder (2008; titled Oscar Wilde and the Ring of Death in the U.K.), a mystery in which the famous London playwright and witty man-about-town plays a game of "Who would you kill if you had no chance of being caught?" and discovers to his horror that the suggested victims are beginning to turn up dead; #2 in the Oscar Wilde mystery series.

Gyles Brandreth, Oscar Wilde and the Dead Man's Smile (2009), famous London playwright and witty man-about-town encounters a series of suspicious deaths after he finishes a lecture tour to the U.S. and takes an ocean liner to France; #3 in the Oscar Wilde mystery series.

Gyles Brandreth, Oscar Wilde and the Vampire Murders (2011), a mystery in which the famous London playwright and witty man-about-town investigates the mysterious death of a duchess following a party at which one of the guests claims to be a vampire; #4 in the Oscar Wilde mystery series.

Gyles Brandreth, Oscar Wilde and the Vatican Murders (2011), a mystery featuring Sir Arthur Conan Doyle happening upon Oscar Wilde in Germany and teaming up with him to solve a mystery involving gruesome objects among the fan mail addressed to Doyle's creation Sherlock Holmes; #5 in the Oscar Wilde mystery series.

Gyles Brandreth, Oscar Wilde and the Murders at Reading Gaol (2013), a novel in which Oscar Wilde is called back after his release from Reading Gaol to solve the murders of the prison's warder and chaplain; #6 in the Oscar Wilde mystery series.


Diana Bretherick, City of Devils (2013), about a Scottish physician who travels to Turin in the 1890s to study criminology, where he finds he must investigate a murder without his teacher's help.


Jump to #29 in the Mrs. Jeffries series

Emily Brightwell, The Inspector and Mrs. Jeffries (1993), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a doctor is found dead in his office; #1 in the Mrs. Jeffries series; first three mysteries available in an omnibus edition, Mrs. Jeffries Learns the Trade.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Dusts for Clues (1993), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when the inspector finds a missing brooch on a dead woman; #2 in the Mrs. Jeffries series; first three mysteries available in an omnibus edition, Mrs. Jeffries Learns the Trade.

Emily Brightwell, The Ghost and Mrs. Jeffries (1993), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a woman is murdered after her death is predicted at a seance; #3 in the Mrs. Jeffries series; first three mysteries available in an omnibus edition, Mrs. Jeffries Learns the Trade.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries on the Ball (1994), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a woman is murdered during a Jubilee Ball in the Queen's honor; #4 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Takes Stock (1994), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a businessman accused of swindling his shareholders is murdered; #5 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries on the Trail (1995), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a flower-seller is murdered; #6 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Plays the Cook (1995), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when she must fill in for the inspector's cook and try to nab a killer as well; #7 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries and the Missing Alibi (1996), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when the inspector himself is suspected of murder; #8 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Stands Corrected (1996), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when the inspector decides to investigate a case without her assistance; #9 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Takes the Stage (1997), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a theatre critic is drowned; #10 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Questions the Answer (1997), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when an unlikeable woman is stabbed in the back; #11 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Reveals Her Art (1998), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when an artist's houseguest is murdered; #12 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Takes the Cake (1998), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a man is killed at a table set with two dessert plates; #13 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Rocks the Boat (1999), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a visitor from Australia dies in a garden, the gate to which is securely locked; #14 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Weeds the Plot (2000), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when an eccentric heiress's bloodhound digs up a corpse; #15 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Pinches the Post (2001), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a shady businessman is murdered and his maid subsequently disappears; #16 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Pleads Her Case (2003), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a man's death is ruled a suicide after a less-than-rigorous investigation; #17 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Sweeps the Chimney (2004), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a corpse dressed as a vicar perplexes the police; #18 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Stalks the Hunter (2004), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a man is murdered and a young lady is accused of the crime; #19 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries and the Silent Knight (2005), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a man's head is bashed in during a family Christmas holiday distinctly lacking in cheer; #20 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Appeals the Verdict (2006), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when an innocent man is convicted of murder; #21 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries and the Best Laid Plans (2007), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a reclusive miser is found dead; #22 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries and the Feast of St. Stephen (2007), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when the host of a Christmas dinner dies during the meal; #23 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Holds the Trump (2008), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a much-loved businessman is found drowned; #24 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries in the Nick of Time (2009), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a train enthusiast is murdered; #25 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries and the Yuletide Weddings (2009), about a Victorian police inspector whose housekeeper is the genius behind his crime-solving success, when a murder occurs amid preparations for a long-awaited wedding; #26 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Speaks Her Mind (2010), about a housekeeper who assists her employer, a police inspector, in investigating the case of a friendless woman whose insistence that someone is trying to kill her is ignored until too late; #27 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries Forges Ahead (2011), about a housekeeper who assists her employer, a police inspector, in investigating the case of a beautiful woman poisoned at her own dinner party; #28 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.

Emily Brightwell, Mrs. Jeffries and the Mistletoe Mix-Up (2011), about a housekeeper who assists her employer, a police inspector, in solving the case of an art collector murdered during the Christmas season; #29 in the Mrs. Jeffries series.


Raymond Buckland, Cursed in the Act (2014), a mystery in which future author Bram Stoker, manager for London’s Lyceum Theatre from 1878-1898, turns sleuth in 1881 when an understudy in a production of Hamlet is killed; #1 in a planned series.


Kenneth Cameron, The Frightened Man (2009), about an American novelist and former lawman living in London who is drawn to investigate after a stranger turns up at his door claiming to have seen Jack the Ripper; #2 in the Denton series.

Kenneth Cameron, The Bohemian Girl (2009), about an American novelist and former lawman living in London whose search for a woman in trouble takes him to the Bohemian quarter where artists and their models live; #2 in the Denton series.

Kenneth Cameron, The Second Woman (2010), about an American novelist and former lawman living in London who is drawn into the investigation of a Polish immigrant murdered in the house adjoining his own; #3 in the Denton mystery series.

Kenneth Cameron, Winter at Death's Hotel (2012), a mystery featuring Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's wife Louisa as sleuth when a woman is murdered in New York during Doyle's American tour in 1896.


Caleb Carr, The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes (2005), Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson go to Scotland to solve a murder mystery with connections to a sixteenth century murder and a variety of seemingly supernatural manifestations.


Carol K. Carr, India Black (2011), about a woman who manages a London brothel and is drawn into espionage after a government official dies while patronizing her establishment; #1 in the Madam of Espionage series.

Carol K. Carr, India Black and the Widow of Windsor (2011), about a woman who manages a London brothel and takes on a spying mission in Scotland at Christmastime when Prime Minister Disraeli suspects a plot to assassinate Queen Victoria; #2 in the Madam of Espionage series.

Carol K. Carr, India Black and the Rajah's Ruby (2012), about a woman who manages a London brothel and turns the tables on a man she realizes is using her to steal a valuable jewel; #3 in the Madam of Espionage series.

Carol K. Carr, India Black and the Shadows of Anarchy (2013), about a woman who manages a London brothel and is asked by the prime minister to spy on an anarchist group which has been assassinating aristocrats; #4 in the Madam of Espionage series.

Carol K. Carr, India Black and the Gentleman Thief (2014), about the madam of a high-class London brothel who spies for the the Crown and investigates the murder of a military officer; #5 in the Madam of Espionage series.


John Dickson Carr, The Bride of Newgate (1950), about a woman who, to gain an inheritance, marries a convict scheduled to be hanged an hour later. Review

John Dickson Carr, Fire, Burn! (1957), about the first British police force, Sir Robert Peel's "Peelers" and their investigation of a murder in 1829.

John Dickson Carr, The Scandal at High Chimneys (1959), about a ghostly apparition and a murder in a London mansion in 1865.

John Dickson Carr, The Demoniacs (1962), about a member of the Bow Street Runners, London's first police force, whose rescue of a naive young woman from a school for prostitutes leads to his investigation of the mysterious murder of an old woman with a scandalous past.

John Dickson Carr, Papa La-Bas (1968), about a senator who investigates a murder in 1858 New Orleans.

John Dickson Carr, Deadly Hall (1971), about a novelist who returns to his boyhood home, New Orleans, in 1927 to investigate a murder connected with a friend's inheritance.

John Dickson Carr, The Hungry Goblin (1972), a mystery set in 1869 featuring real-life novelist Wilkie Collins as the detective.


Joanna Challis, Eye of the Serpent, romantic suspense about a nineteenth-century Englishwoman in Austria.

Karen Charlton, Catching the Eagle (2011), about an innocent Northumberland farm laborer accused of stealing a vast sum from a manor house in 1809 and his younger brother, whose efforts to clear his name are complicated when he falls in love with his brother's wife; #1 in the planned Regency Reivers series.

Pamela Christie, Death and the Courtesan (2013), about a courtesan in Regency England who must find the real killer after she is framed for murder.

Paula Marantz Cohen, What Alice Knew (2010), a standalone mystery featuring psychologist William James, novelist Henry James and their invalid sister Alice James collaborating with the London police to solve the Jack the Ripper killings. Review or Author Interview

Bernard Cornwell, Gallows Thief (2001), a standalone mystery novel about a hero of Waterloo who returns to London in 1820 to find himself destitute in a country where poverty and injustice are rife, and takes a job as a private investigator both for the money and for the chance to free an innocent man convicted of murder.

Michael Cox, The Meaning of Night: A Confession (2006), a dark thriller about an educated man who is also a brutal, amoral killer seeking to reclaim his usurped inheritance.

Michael Cox, The Glass of Time (2008), a dark thriller about an orphaned young woman who takes a job as lady's maid in 1876 in order to spy on her employer.


G.W. Dahlquist, The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters (2006), a historical fantasy thriller about a woman who assumes a disguise and travels to London in order to find out why her fiancé ended their engagement; #1 in the Glass Books of the Dream Eaters trilogy.

G.W. Dahlquist, The Dark Volume (2008; also titled The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters, Volume Two), a historical fantasy thriller about a woman trying to defeat a plot for world domination; #2 in the Glass Books of the Dream Eaters trilogy.

G.W. Dahlquist, The Chemickal Marriage (2012), a historical fantasy thriller about a woman trying to defeat a plot for world domination; #3 in the Glass Books of the Dream Eaters trilogy.


David Stuart Davies, Sherlock Holmes and the Hentzau Affair (1991), a tale inspired by Arthur Conan Doyle's detective stories and Alexandre Dumas's The Prisoner of Zenda in which Sherlock Holmes travels to Ruritania to get to the bottom of a political plot; #1 in the Sherlock Holmes Adventures series.

David Stuart Davies, The Tangled Skein (1995), Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson must battle a plague of vampires and come face-to-face with Count Dracula himself; #2 in the Sherlock Holmes Adventures series.

David Stuart Davies, The Scroll of the Dead (1998), Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson set out to prevent a fake medium from using an ancient Egyptian papyrus to make himself immortal; #3 in the Sherlock Holmes Adventures series.

David Stuart Davies, The Shadow of the Rat (1999), Holmes and Watson pursue the Giant Rat of Sumatra; #4 in the Sherlock Holmes Adventures series.

David Stuart Davies, The Veiled Detective (2004), a prequel to the Sherlock Holmes stories imagining how Holmes, Watson, and their nemesis Professor Moriarty might have met; #5 in the Sherlock Holmes Adventures series.


Anna Dean, A Moment of Silence (2008; titled Bellfield Hall in the U.S.), a humorous mystery about the spinster aunt asked to investigate the strange disappearance of her niece's fiancé during an engagement party on the eve of their wedding; #1 in the Dido Kent mystery series.

Anna Dean, A Gentleman of Fortune: Or, The Suspicions of Miss Dido Kent (2009), a humorous mystery about an inquisitive spinster who spices up a visit to her cousin in 1806 by pursuing her suspicion that a neighbor's sudden death may have been murder; #2 in the Dido Kent mystery series.

Anna Dean, A Woman of Consequence, (2012), a humorous mystery about an inquisitive spinster who refuses to believe that a ghost known as the Grey Nun is haunting a ruined abbey; #3 in the Dido Kent mystery series.


David Dickinson, Goodnight, Sweet Prince (2002), an Irish investigator is asked to discreetly find out who killed Queen Victoria's grandson Prince Eddy in 1892, while the royal family gives out the story that he died of influenza; #1 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death and the Jubilee (2002), an Irish investigator discovers the royal family is in danger during the Jubilee celebration as he tracks down who killed the corpse found in the Thames; #2 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death of an Old Master (2004), an Irish investigator tracks down a master forger; #3 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death of a Chancellor (2004), an Irish investigator tries to discreetly find out who killed the Chancellor of Compton Cathedral during the preparations for its millennium celebration in 1901; #4 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death Called to the Bar (2006), an Irish investigator tries to find out who is killing barristers and why; #5 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death on the Nevskii Prospect (2006), a retired Irish investigator travels to Russia on the eve of the Revolution to find out who cut the throat of a British diplomat; #6 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death on the Holy Mountain (2007), an Irish investigator is looking into a series of art thefts from wealthy Protestant homes in Ireland when people begin disappearing too; #7 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death of a Pilgrim (2009), an Irish investigator goes to France in 1905 to find out who is killing pilgrims on their way to the shrine at Santiago de Compostela, Spain; #8 in the Lord Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death of a Wine Merchant (2010), about an Irish investigator the case of a murder apparently committed by the uncle of a bridegroom immediately after a wedding uniting two wealthy families; #9 in the Lord Francis Powerscourt series.

David Dickinson, Death in a Scarlet Coat (2011), about an Irish investigator stranded in a small town in 1909, where he discovers a recent death may have been a case of murder; #10 in the Lord Francis Powerscourt series.


Vaughn Entwistle, The Revenant of Thraxton Hall (2014), a mystery which imagines author Arthur Conan Doyle hired to protect a medium who fears, based on what she believes is a prophetic dream, that she is going to be murdered during a seance; #1 in the Paranormal Casebooks of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle mystery series.

Laurie Alice Eakes, A Necessary Deception (2011), historical romance about a young widow in 1812 London whose assistance to a French prisoner could lead her into danger; #1 in the planned Daughters of Bainbridge House series.

Lyndsay Faye, Dust and Shadow (2009), a thriller which pits Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional creation Sherlock Holmes against the historical killer Jack the Ripper. Review at the LA Times


Charles Finch, A Beautiful Blue Death (2008), about a Victorian gentleman asked to help investigate the death of a friend's former servant, which may not be suicide; #1 in the Charles Lenox mystery series.

Charles Finch, The September Society (2009), about a Victorian gentleman who agrees to help a widow find her son, who has disappeared from his room at Oxford; #2 in the Charles Lenox mystery series.

Charles Finch, The Fleet Street Murders (2010), about a recently engaged Victorian gentleman who becomes involved in investigating the murders of two journalists and discovers the case may interfere with his wedding; #3 in the Charles Lenox mystery series.

Charles Finch, A Stranger in Mayfair (2010), about a Victorian gentleman who helps investigate the murder of a footman who led a double life; #4 in the Charles Lenox mystery series.

Charles Finch, An East End Murder (2011), a mystery short story featuring the detective in the Charles Lenox series investigating a strangling death on Great Andrews Street in London in 1865; #5 in the Charles Lenox mystery series.

Charles Finch, A Death in the Small Hours (2012), about a Victorian gentleman who visits a small village near Bath where vandalism escalates into murder; #6 in the Charles Lenox mystery series.

Charles Finch, An Old Betrayal (2013), about a Victorian gentleman who investigates the murder of a country squire which could be part of a plot to strike at the monarchy; #7 in the Charles Lenox series.


Sara Fraser, The Reluctant Constable (2007), about a timid and impoverished bachelor given the job of constable in his parish who must track down a killer who mutilates his victims; #1 in the Thomas Potts Victorian mystery series.

Sara Fraser, The Resurrection Men (2008), about a parish constable in 1826 who must deal with a gang of body-snatchers that also robs and murders; #2 in the Thomas Potts Victorian mystery series.

Sara Fraser, The Drowned Ones (2009), about a parish constable in 1827 who thinks the local barge-workers may know something they aren't telling him about the serving girl found drowned in a canal; #3 in the Thomas Potts Victorian mystery series.

Sara Fraser, Suffer the Children (2011), about a parish constable who thinks the cases of a mad girl and a dead boy may both be connected to the abduction of a wagon full of children from the poorhouse; #4 in the Thomas Potts Victorian mystery series.

Sara Fraser, Till Death Do Us Part (2013), about a parish constable who, while dealing with a series of dog thefts, suspects two apparently charming men may have deadly plans for a spinster who answered their newpaper ad; #4 in the Thomas Potts Victorian mystery series.


Philip Gooden, The Salisbury Manuscripts (2008), about a London lawyer who must investigate the murder of a Salisbury canon in 1873 in order to clear himself of suspicion; #1 in the Tom Ansell series.

Philip Gooden, The Durham Disappearance (2009), about a lawyer and his novelist wife who must investigate the death of a famous medium when she is suspected of his murder; #2 in the Tom Ansell series.

Rebecca Gowers, The Twisted Heart (2009), about a modern literature student immersed in research for her thesis which attempts to establish a link between a murder in a Dickens novel and the unsolved murder of a prostitute in 1838.


Ann Granger, A Rare Interest in Corpses (2006) (titled The Companion in the U.S.), about a woman who, while working as a companion to a wealthy London widow who is also a slum landlord, discovers the corpse of her predecessor; #1 in the Lizzie Martin mystery series.

Ann Granger, A Mortal Curiosity (2008), about a woman working as a lady's companion who takes a job comforting a mother whose baby has died; #2 in the Lizzie Martin mystery series.

Ann Granger, A Better Quality of Murder (2010), about a woman who is married to a Scotland Yard inspector and assists his investigation into the murder of an art dealer's beautiful Italian wife; #3 in the Lizzie Martin mystery series.

Ann Granger, A Particular Eye for Villainy (2012), about a woman who is married to a Scotland Yard inspector and assists his investigation into the death of a man bludgeoned in his living room; #4 in the Lizzie Martin mystery series.


Alex Grecian, The Yard (2012), about a newly hired member of Scotland Yard's "Murder Squad" who teams up with the Yard’s first forensic pathologist to investigate the murder of another squad member; #1 in the Murder Squad series.

Alex Grecian, The Black Country (2013), about the newest detective in Scotland Yard's Murder Squad, and his investigation of the disappearance of a prominent family from a village in the English Midlands which is slowly sinking into the coal mines beneath it; #2 in the Murder Squad series.

Kate Griffin, Kitty Peck and the Music Hall Murders (2013), about a seventeen-year-old seamstress who investigates a series of murders of the dancers in the London music hall where she works.


Michael Hardwick, Prisoner of the Devil (1979), the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes investigates the Dreyfus Case.

Michael Hardwick, Sherlock Holmes: My Life and Crimes (1984), a novel narrated by the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes as an aging man looking back on his life.

Michael Hardwick, The Private Life of Dr. Watson (1983), the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes's sidekick Dr. Watson recalls his own youthful travels and adventures.

Michael Hardwick, The Revenge of the Hound (1987), as the notorious hound of the Baskervilles reappears, the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes investigates the theft of Oliver Cromwell's bones.

Michael Hardwick, Nightbone (1989), a police procedural set in Victorian England.


C.S. Harris, What Angels Fear (2005), about a young English nobleman haunted by his experiences in the recent Napoleonic Wars who is accused of the murder of a beautiful young woman in 1811 Georgian England; #1 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

C.S. Harris, When Gods Die (2006), about a young English nobleman drawn into a murder investigation when a necklace that once belonged to his mother is found around the dead woman's neck; #2 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

C.S. Harris, Why Mermaids Sing (2007), about a young English nobleman who becomes obsessed with solving a series of strange murders of young men of prominent families in 1811 Georgian England; #3 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

C.S. Harris, Where Serpents Sleep (2008), about a young English nobleman who teams up with the daughter of a cousin of the Prince Regent in 1812 London to bring to justice the murderer of eight prostitutes; #4 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

C.S. Harris, What Remains of Heaven (2009), about a young English nobleman who must investigate the deaths of two men whose bodies are discovered in an ancient crypt, with a suspect list that includes the son of Benjamin Franklin; #5 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

C. S. Harris, Where Shadows Dance (2011), about a young English nobleman who who investigates the murder of a man who worked in the Foreign Office; #6 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series. Review

C.S. Harris, When Maidens Mourn, (2012), about a young English nobleman and his independent new bride who investigate the murder of an antiquarian who had been studying a moat reputed to be connected with King Arthur; #7 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

C.S. Harris, What Darkness Brings (2013), about an English nobleman who, while investigating the murder of a diplomat, finds that his bride-to-be seems to know more that she ought to about the man's death; #8 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

C.S. Harris, Why Kings Confess (2014), (2014), about an English nobleman who investigates the murder and mutilation in 1813 of a physician which may be connected with the disappearance eighteen years previously of the former dauphin during the French Revolution; #9 in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.


Anthony Horowitz, The House of Silk (2011), a Sherlock Holmes tale in which Dr. Watson recalls a case involving an art dealer in fear of his life. Review

Anna Lee Huber, The Anatomist's Wife (2012), about an anatomist's widow in 1830 Scotland who become the suspect in a gruesome murder case because she used to make drawings for her husband; #1 in the Lady Darby mystery series.

Anna Lee Huber, Mortal Arts (2013), about an anatomist's widow who travels to Edinburgh in 1830 where she investigates a murder her former art tutor has been accused of; #2 in the Lady Darby mystery series.


Jane Jakeman, Let There Be Blood (1997), about a reclusive aristocrat who sets out to find the truth when a gypsy is accused of murdering a farmer in the West Country in 1830; #1 in the Lord Ambrose Malfine mystery series.

Jane Jakeman, The Egyptian Coffin (1997), about a reclusive aristocrat who travels to Egypt to protect an heiress after he learns of a young girl's death; #2 in the Lord Ambrose Malfine mystery series.

Jane Jakeman, Fool's Gold (1998), about a reclusive aristocrat who investigates the murder of a physician by poisoning; #3 in the Lord Ambrose Malfine mystery series.


Jacqueline Jacques, The Colours of Corruption (2013), about a poor woman in Victorian London who witnesses a murder and the artist who tries to protect her after he realizes his portrait of her has exposed her to the killers.

M.R.C. Kasasian, The Mangle Street Murders (2013), about a young woman who in 1882 after her father dies, goes to live in London with her guardian, a famous private detective; #1 in a planned series.

Tabish Khair, The Thing About Thugs (2012), about a British officer and amateur archaeologist who brings a member of India's thugee cult to London to make a phrenological study of his skull and must then clear him of a murder charge.


Michael Kurland, The Infernal Device (1979), a mystery based on Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, in which Holmes and his rival Professor Moriarty are forced to collaborate to prevent a plot against the monarchy.

Michael Kurland, Victorian Villainy (2011), a collection of mystery stories based on Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, in which Holmes's rival, Professor Moriarty, solves four mysteries; plus four mystery stories set in ancient Rome during Emperor Vespasian's rule; #3 in the Professor Moriarty mystery series.

Michael Kurland, The Great Game (2014), a mystery based on Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, in which Holmes and his rival Professor Moriarty travel separately to Vienna, as anarchists plot to topple the governments of Europe; #3 and the first full-length novel in the Professor Moriarty mystery series.

Michael Kurland, The Empress of India (2006), a mystery based on Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, in which the evil Professor Moriarty boards an ocean liner in an attempt to steal a jeweled treasure being shipped from Calcutta to England; #4 in the Professor Moriarty mystery series.

Michael Kurland, Who Thinks Evil (2014), a mystery based on Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, in which the evil Professor Moriarty is asked, in the absence of Holmes, to find out who is attempting to frame Queen Victoria's grandson for murder; #5 in the Professor Moriarty mystery series.


Martha Lea, The Specimen (2013), about an English woman who in 1866 is accused of murdering her husband, a butterfly collector.

Catherine Lloyd, Death Comes to the Village (2013), about a Waterloo veteran who returns to his home village to recuperate from a broken leg, and with the help of the rector's daughter investigates the disappearance of two young serving girls; #1 in the planned Kurland St. Mary mystery series.


Edward Marston, The Railway Detective (2004), about a railway detective in Victorian England who must investigate an attack on London to Birmingham mail train that endangers the train driver's beautiful daughter; #1 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, The Excursion Train (2005), about a railway detective in Victorian England who investigates the murder of a passenger who once worked as a public executioner; #2 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, The Railway Viaduct (2006), about a railway detective in Victorian England who investigates the murder of an unidentified passenger whose clothes suggest he is from the Continent; #3 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, The Iron Horse (2007), about a railway detective in Victorian England who must find out why a decapitated head was left on a train and who was responsible; #4 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, Murder on the Brighton Express (2008), about a railway detective in Victorian England who suspects that a devastating train derailment was not the result of driver error; #5 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, The Silver Locomotive Mystery (2009), about a railway detective in Victorian England who must solve a gruesome murder and the theft of a silver coffeepot; #6 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, Railway to the Grave (2010), about a railway detective in Victorian England who wonders whether an old army friend, killed by a speeding train, really intended suicide; #7 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, Blood on the Line (2011), about a railway detective in Victorian England who must track down an escaped convict who murdered two policemen; #8 in the Railway Detective series.

Edward Marston, Peril in the Royal Train (2013), about a team of investigators who must find out the cause of a train crash which may involve a conspiracy against Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; #9 in the Railway Detective series.


James McCreet, The Thieves’ Labyrinth (2011), about a police detective in Victorian London who discovers a dark connection between a number of recent deaths and thefts.

D.E. Meredith, Devoured (2010), about a professor skilled in criminal investigation and his morgue assistant who help Scotland Yard investigate the murder of a woman fossil collector; #1 in the Hatton and Roumande mystery series.

D.E. Meredith, The Devil’s Ribbon (2013), about a forensic scientist and his assistant in 1858 London who, during a cholera epidemic among the city's poor Irish, must investigate a series of murders in which the killer leaves a green ribbon with the victim, a Fenian warning; #2 in the Hatton and Roumande mystery series.

Nicholas Meyer, The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1974), a mystery that imagines what might have happened if Sherlock Holmes and Sigmund Freud had collaborated on an investigation.

Graham Moore, The Sherlockian (2010), about a present-day Sherlock Holmes scholar whose murder is linked to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's hunt for a serial killer in 1890s London.

David Morrell, Murder as a Fine Art (2013), a novel in which Thomas De Quincey, the author of the 1821 memoir Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, must solve a series of murders several decades later which appear to be connected to his memoir.

Sena Jeter Naslund, Sherlock in Love (1993), about Dr. Watson's investigations into a previously unreported adventure of the recently deceased Sherlock Holmes.

John O’Connell, Baskerville (2013), about Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and a newspaperman, formerly Doyle's friend, who may have collaborated with him in writing The Hound of the Baskervilles.


Robin Paige, Death at Bishop's Keep, about an American writer of "penny dreadfuls" who joins a local amateur in investigating a death connected with an archaeological dig near near Essex, England; #1 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Gallow's Green, an American writer, an amateur scientist and Beatrix Potter collaborate to investigate the murder of a constable; #2 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Daisy's Folly, an American writer and an amateur scientist team up to investigate two murders at an aristocratic woman's weekend party; #3 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Devil's Bridge, after their wedding, an American writer and an amateur scientist host an automobile exhibition that turns deadly; #4 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Rottingdean, on holiday, a pair of amateur sleuths collaborate with Rudyard Kipling to find out who murdered the coast guard whose body turned up on the beach; #5 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Whitechapel, a pair of amateur sleuths come to the aid of Jennie Churchill when someone claims the father of her son, Winston, was Jack the Ripper; #6 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Epsom Downs, a pair of amateur sleuths are asked to investigate murder and jewel theft at the races; #7 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Dartmoor, a pair of amateur sleuths collaborate with Arthur Conan Doyle when a body is found on the moor; #8 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Glamis Castle, a pair of amateur sleuths discover that a prince believed to have been dead for years is actually alive and suspected of a grisly murder; #9 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series. Review

Robin Paige, Death in Hyde Park, a pair of amateur sleuths are called to investigate after a bomb goes off at King Edward's coronation ceremony; #10 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death at Blenheim Palace, a pair of amateur sleuths discover there may be a link between a recent kidnapping and the 700-year-old unsolved murder of the mistress of Henry II; #11 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.

Robin Paige, Death on the Lizard, a pair of amateur sleuths investigate murder connected to the latest in modern technology, the wireless telegraph; #12 in the Sir Charles Sheridan mystery series.


Charles Palliser, The Quincunx, a dark mystery about a boy and his mother whose lives spiral into disaster because of a secret his mother is keeping about an inheritance. Review from Steven Wu's Book Reviews

Kate Parker, The Vanishing Thief (2013), about a woman who supplements her regular job as an antiquarian bookseller with work for a secret society of private investigators; #1 in the planned Victorian Bookshop mystery series.

Caro Peacock, The Foreign Affair, about a young woman who poses as a governess in 1837 England in order to spy on a man believed to be involved in a treasonous plot; #1 in the Liberty Lane mystery series.

Caro Peacock, A Dangerous Affair (2009), a young woman on her own in London after her father's death becomes involved in a murder investigation after a handsome young politician named Benjamin Disraeli asks her to find out more about a notorious prima ballerina; #2 in the Liberty Lane mystery series.

Iain Pears, Stone's Fall (2009), about a wealthy English businessman's childless widow who must find the child to whom he willed his fortune shortly before dying in a fall from an upper-story window in 1909.


Andrew Pepper, The Last Days of Newgate (2006), a violent, hard-boiled thriller about a Bow Street Runner investigating a series of grisly murders in 1829 London; #1 in the Pyke Mystery series.

Andrew Pepper, The Revenge of Captain Paine (2007), about a former Bow Street Runner asked to unofficially investigate a decapitation in 1834 as the Industrial Revolution brings railways and oppressive conditions for workers to England; #2 in the Pyke Mystery series.

Andrew Pepper, Kill-Devil and Water (2008), about a former Bow Street Runner down on his luck who is freed from debtor's prison so he can investigate the murder of a poor Jamaican immigrant while the rest of the force concentrates on the suspicious death of an important aristocrat; #3 in the Pyke Mystery series.

Andrew Pepper, The Detective Branch (2010, also titled The Detective Bureau), about a member of London's new "Detective Bureau" who investigates the death of a policeman and finds it is linked to a tavern landlord's murder; #4 in the Pyke Mystery series.


Anne Perry, The Face of a Stranger (1990), about a Victorian police officer with amnesia who must investigate his own past along with the murder he’s been assigned to; #1 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, A Dangerous Mourning, a Victorian police officer with amnesia must investigate his own past as, with the help of a nurse who once worked with Florence Nightingale, he tries to find out who murdered an aristocrat's daughter; #2 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Defend and Betray, when a general's wife confesses to his murder, a detective with amnesia must find out who really killed her husband; #3 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, A Sudden, Fearful Death, a private investigator with amnesia discovers frightening clues about his own past as he investigates the strangling death of a nurse; #4 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, The Sins of the Wolf, a private investigator with amnesia must find the real killer when a nurse who has assisted him in several previous investigations is charged with murder; #5 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Cain His Brother, a private investigator with amnesia tries to find a missing man who may have been murdered by his twin brother; #6 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Weighed in the Balance, a private investigator with amnesia is hired to find evidence for a countess's claim that the prince of a small German principality was murdered by his wife; #7 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, The Silent Cry, a private investigator with amnesia discovers that the murder of a solicitor is connected with a series of brutal attacks on local prostitutes; #8 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, The Whited Sepulchres (titled A Breach of Promise in the U.S.), a private investigator with amnesia and a nurse who worked with Florence Nightingale investigate a breach of promise suit that turns into a murder case; #9 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, The Twisted Root, a private investigator is hired to find a man's missing fiancé; #10 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Slaves of Obsession, a private investigator and his wife travel to America on the trail of a murderer and a missing cache of weapons during the Civil War; #11 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, A Funeral in Blue, a private investigator with amnesia tries to find out who murdered two women in an artist's studio, one of them the wife of a surgeon who is his wife's colleague; #12 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Death of a Stranger, a private investigator with amnesia is hired to look into the background of a woman's fiancé, a railway executive, and rediscovers traumatic lost memories of his own; #13 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, The Shifting Tide, a private investigator tries to find out who murdered a ship's watchman and stole a cargo of African ivory; #14 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Dark Assassin, a Thames River Police superintendent tries to find out whether a couple's death by drowning was a tragic accident, suicide or murder; #15 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Execution Dock (2009), about a detective with the Thames River Police who, after the man he arrested is freed from prison, discovers murkier depths in a case he thought he had solved; #16 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Acceptable Loss (2011), about a detective with the Thames River Police who wonders why a petty thief was strangled with a silk cravat before being thrown into the Thames; #17 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, A Sunless Sea (2012), about a Thames River policeman and his wife who investigate the murder of a quiet woman, apparently a prostitute, whose mutilated body was found on a pier; #18 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Blind Justice (2013), about a Thames River policeman and his wife who suspect that the minister of a London church is swindling its members; #19 in the William Monk mystery series.

Anne Perry, Blood on the Water (2014), about the head of London's River Police and his wife, who suspect the Egyptian sentenced to hang for blowing up a pleasure boat may be innocent; #20 in the William Monk mystery series.


Anne Perry, The Cater Street Hangman (1979), about a Victorian police inspector who, while investigating the murder of a garrotted maid, and falls unsuitably in love with a young woman from a wealthy family; #1 in the Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Callander Square (1980), about a Victorian police inspector with a lower-class background who with the help of his upper-class wife investigates the murder of two babies; #2 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Paragon Walk (1981), about a Victorian police inspector with a lower-class background who with the help of his upper-class wife investigates the murder of a young woman; #3 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Resurrection Row (1981), about a Victorian police inspector with a lower-class background who with the help of his upper-class wife investigates the strange case of a dead and buried gentleman whose corpse turns up in a hansom cab; #4 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Rutland Place (1983), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who look into the disappearance of her mother's locket, a compromising memento, and find they have embarked on a search leading to far more terrible secrets; #5 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Bluegate Fields (1984), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate the death of an upper-class boy whose body was found in the slums; #6 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Death in the Devil's Acre (1985), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate the brutal murder of a doctor; #7 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Cardington Crescent (1987), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who attempt to clear her sister of a murder charge after the sister's philandering husband is murdered; #8 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Silence in Hanover Close (1988), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate an unsolved case from three years earlier, which the authorities want handled in a quiet, diplomatic way; #9 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Bethlehem Road (1990), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate a series of murders of Members of Parliament who voted against women's suffrage; #10 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Highgate Rise (1991), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate a case of arson; #11 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Belgrave Square (1992), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate the murder of a seedy money-lender with a list of distinguished aristocrats in his office; #12 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Farriers' Lane (1993), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate the murder of a judge about to reopen an old case; #13 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, The Hyde Park Headsman (1994), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate a series of beheadings, with a strange lack of support from his superiors; #14 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Traitors Gate (1995), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate a death that may be linked to a spy operating in the government's Colonial Office; #15 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Pentecost Alley (1996), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate the murder of a prostitute under whose body was found a badge from the Hellfire Club; #16 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Ashworth Hall (1997), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate the murder of a government official in charge of negotiations over the prospect of Irish home rule; #17 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Brunswick Gardens (1998), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate the death of an outspoken women who championed feminism and Darwin's theory of evolution; #18 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Bedford Square (1999), about a Victorian police inspector and his wife who investigate why a dead body was found on the doorstep of a general's home; #19 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Half Moon Street (2000), about a Victorian police inspector who tries to uncover the identity of a dead man discovered floating down the Thames in a punt; #20 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, The Whitechapel Conspiracy (2001), about a Victorian police inspector transferred to a Special Branch investigation while Jack the Ripper remains at large; #21 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Southampton Row (2002), about a Victorian police inspector who investigates the murder of a clairvoyant whose seances are attended by London's fashionable aristocrats; #22 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Seven Dials (2003), about a Victorian police inspector who investigates the murder of a junior diplomat found in the garden of a mansion where a beautiful Egyptian woman lives; #23 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Long Spoon Lane (2005), about a Victorian police inspector who discovers police corruption when he investigates an anarchist bombing and, with his wife's assistance, sets out to thwart a dangerous conspiracy; #24 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Buckingham Palace Gardens (2008), about a Victorian police inspector who must investigate the murder of a prostitute whose body was discovered during a party given by the Prince of Wales; #25 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Treason at Lisson Grove (2011), about a Special Branch police officer investigating the death of a government informant who died before he could reveal details about an international plot with the potential to destroy the British Empire; #26 in the Thomas and Charlotte Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Dorchester Terrace (2011), about the head of Britain's Special Branch, who worries that he may have been promoted beyond his abilities as rumors suggest a Habsburg duke will be assassinated during his imminent visit to England; #27 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series.

Anne Perry, Midnight at Marble Arch (2013), about a Special Branch investigator who quietly assists an investigation of the baffling rape and apparent suicide of a wealthy merchant's wife when offensive rumors begin to circulate; #28 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.

Anne Perry, Death on Blackheath (2014), about a newly promoted head of Special Branch, who with his wife's help, investigates the disappearance of a maid who worked for a naval weapons expert; #29 in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery series.


Anne Perry, A Christmas Journey (2003; also titled Journey Toward Christmas), about an aristocratic young woman (Lady Vespasia Cumming-Gould of the William Monk series, in her younger years) who joins a woman blamed for a house party guest's suicide on a trip to inform the dead girl's mother in Scotland of the tragedy; #1 in the Christmas series.

Anne Perry, A Christmas Visitor (2004), about an aristocrat (the father of barrister Oliver Rathbone of the William Monk series) who arrives to spend Christmas at a manor house to find its master is dead and family members are being slandered; #2 in the Christmas series.

Anne Perry, A Christmas Guest (2005), about an elderly London aristocrat (Grandmama of the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series) who regrets her chilly behavior toward a fellow Christmas guest after the woman dies suddenly, and decides to investigate; #3 in the Christmas series.

Anne Perry, A Christmas Secret (2006), about a substitute vicar and his wife who arrive at a village parish before Christmas to find that the regular vicar is not, as they were led to believe, on holiday; #4 in the Christmas series.

Anne Perry, A Christmas Beginning (2007), about a Scotland Yard inspector who is on holiday on the Welsh Isle of Anglesey when he finds the dead body of the vicar's sister in a churchyard; #5 in the Christmas series.

Anne Perry, A Christmas Grace (2008), about a woman who goes to visit her aunt in the western Irish county of Connemara and decides to solve an old murder case so the villagers will no longer have to worry about a killer in their midst; #6 in the Christmas series.

Anne Perry, A Christmas Promise (2009), about a thirteen-year-old girl who decides to help an eight-year-old girl find the donkey cart that belonged to her murdered uncle, a rag-and-bones man; #7 in the Christmas series. Review

Anne Perry, A Christmas Odyssey (2010), about a aristocrat (the father of barrister Oliver Rathbone of the William Monk series) asked to help find an old friend's missing son, who has fallen prey to opium abuse; #8 in the Christmas series.



Elizabeth Peters, Crocodile on the Sandbank (1975), about an independent young heiress who travels to Egypt, where she encounters both an aggravating archaeologist and a murderous mummy; #1 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series. Review

Elizabeth Peters, The Curse of the Pharaohs (1981), about a husband-and-wife archaeology team who take over another archaeologist's excavation after his sudden death, and then begin to suspect murder; #2 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Mummy Case (1985), about a woman archaeologist who tries to find out who murdered a dealer in Egyptian antiquities; #3 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, Lion in the Valley (1986), about a woman archaeologist whose exciting new dig is delayed when her eight-year-old son is abducted; #4 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Deeds of the Disturber (1988), about a woman archaeologist who is skeptical of the theory that a night watchman in the British museum died as the result of an Egyptian mummy's curse; #5 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Last Camel Died at Noon (1991), about a woman archaeologist and her family who travel to the Sudan, hoping an ancient map will lead them to a secret oasis; #6 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Snake, the Crocodile and the Dog (1992), about an amateur sleuth who must rescue her archeologist husband when he is kidnapped after they return to Amarna, where they fell in love; #7 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Hippopotamus Pool (1996), about a woman archaeologist and her family menaced by a resourceful villain as they begin to excavate an undisturbed royal tomb in Egypt; #8 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, Seeing a Large Cat (1997), about a woman archaeologist who stumbles across a case of modern murder when she and her family excavate an ancient Egyptian tomb; #9 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Ape Who Guards the Balance (1998), about a woman archaeologist whose son obtains a rare papyrus copy of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, a harbinger of trouble; #10 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Falcon at the Portal (1999), about a woman archaeologist who lands in the middle of a murder mystery as she attempts to clear her son of the accusation of stealing artifacts; #11 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, He Shall Thunder in the Sky (2000), about a woman archaeologist and her family whose Egyptian dig is complicated by WWI, the threat of a Turkish invasion, and spies; #12 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, Lord of the Silent (2001), about a woman archaeologist who discovers a recently murdered corpse in an ancient tomb as her son and his bride cope with treachery; #13 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Golden One (2002), about a woman archaeologist who must solve the modern murder of a tomb robber as her son undertakes a mission for British intelligence amid the First World War; #14 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, Children of the Storm (2003), about a woman archaeologist who must face her most formidable adversary at the end of World War I; #15 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, Guardian of the Horizon (2004), about a woman archaeologist and her family who travel to a lost oasis; #16 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, The Serpent on the Crown (2005), about a woman archaeologist who agrees to help a widow identify and return to its tomb a priceless gold statuette said to be cursed; #17 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, Tomb of the Golden Bird (2006), about a family of archaeologists lured into a dangerous mystery as Carnarvon and Carter excavate the magnificent tomb of Tutankhamen, which they had hoped to excavate themselves; #18 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series.

Elizabeth Peters, A River in the Sky (2010), about a husband-wife archaeology team asked to set up a dig in Jerusalem as a cover to investigate a possible German espionage operation; #19 in the Amelia Peabody mystery series. Review


Audrey Peterson, An Unmourned Death, about a young widow employed as a private investigator who is sent to find the missing daughter of an upper class family.

Tim Powers, Hide Me Among the Graves (2012), a supernatural thriller about a veterinarian and a former prostitute who in 1862 discover their daughter is being menaced by a ghostly vampire who may be John Polidori, once Lord Byron's physician and the author of the first work of vampire fiction.

Sarah Pinborough, Mayhem (2013), about a police surgeon faced with the work of a different serial killer while Jack the Ripper remains loose in 1880s London.


Amanda Quick, Second Sight (2006), paranormal romantic suspense about a woman photographer in Victorian England who can see auras and witnesses a murder; #1 in the Arcane Society series.

Amanda Quick, The Third Circle (2008), paranormal romantic suspense about a woman in Victorian England who reads crystals and encounters a psychic mesmerist standing over a murdered woman's body; #4 in the Arcane Society series, and the second with a historical setting.

Amanda Quick, The Perfect Poison (2009), paranormal romantic suspense about a woman botanist in Victorian England who, at a murder scene, discovers traces of a poison that can only have come from a rare fern stolen from her own conservatory; #6 in the Arcane Society series, and the third with a historical setting.

Amanda Quick, Burning Lamp (2010), paranormal romantic suspense about two rivals with psychic abilities and a woman working for social reform in Victorian England; #8 in the Arcane Society series, and the fourth with a historical setting.

Amanda Quick, Quicksilver (2011), paranormal romantic suspense about a woman rescued from a murder scene by a man who hunts killers with psychic powers; #11 in the Arcane Society series, and the fifth with a historical setting.

Amanda Quick, Crystal Gardens (2012), about a novelist who researches paranormal phenomena and grows curious about a ruined abbey next door to her vacation cottage, which leads her into a murder investigation; #1 in the Ladies of Lantern Street mystery series.

Amanda Quick, The Mystery Woman (2013), about a woman on a secret mission and a man who conducts investigations for the crown and suspects her of murder and blackmail; #2 in the Ladies of Lantern Street mystery series.

Amanda Quick, Otherwise Engaged (2014), about a woman who escapes kidnapping by a killer known as "The Bridegroom" and, with the help of a man who has involved her in a scandal, sets out to stop him.


Deanna Raybourn, Silent in the Grave (2006), about the widow of an aristocrat who is first outraged to be told her husband was murdered, then chagrined when she discovers the evidence and realizes she never really knew him; #1 in the Lady Julia Grey series. Review

Deanna Raybourn, Silent in the Sanctuary (2008), an aristocratic young widow and a private enquiry agent investigate the murder of a curate; #2 in the Lady Julia Grey series.

Deanna Raybourn, Silent on the Moor (2009), an aristocratic young widow visiting an ancient Yorkshire family's decrepit house tries to track down a poisoner; #3 in the Lady Julia Grey series. Review

Deanna Raybourn, Dark Road to Darjeeling (2010), about a newlywed amateur sleuth who goes to India with her detective husband to help a friend who fears her own husband was murdered and she and her unborn child may be the next targets.


Nick Rennison, Carver’s Quest (2013), about an amateur archaeologist and his manservant whose search for Philip of Macedon's treasure hoard involves them in a murder mystery.

Laura Joh Rowland, The Secret Adventures of Charlotte Brontë, a thriller which imagines that nineteenth century author Charlotte Brontë stumbled upon a case of murder while visiting her publisher in London. Review

Laura Joh Rowland, Bedlam (2010), a thriller which imagines that author Charlotte Brontë discovers a former lover of hers confined in London's notorious madhouse and under suspicion of being a grisly serial killer; sequel to The Secret Adventures of Charlotte Brontë.

Lloyd Shepherd, The English Monster: Or, the Melancholy Transactions of William Ablass (2012), about a Thames River Police magistrate whose investigation of a series of brutal murders in 1811 London is connected to a case of enslavement in 1564.

Lynn Shepherd, Tom-All-Alone’s (2012; titled The Solitary House in the U.S.), a spin-off from the Dickens novel Bleak House in which an unfairly dismissed policeman trying to make a living as a private detective accepts a job from sinister lawyer Edward Tulkinghorn. Review

Lynn Shepherd, A Treacherous Likeness (2013), about a young detective asked to assist the son of Percy Bysshe Shelley and his wife Mary, and begins to question whether Shelley's first wife committed suicide or was murdered; sequel to Tom-All-Alone's/The Solitary House.

Sergio Silveira, The Secret of Ravelston (2012), about a young spinster whose brother sends her to a town in northern England where she decides to find out the truth about a poor young woman who has disappeared; self-published.

Alastair Sim, The Unbelievers (2010), about a Scottish police inspector and his assistant who investigate the murder of Scotland's richest man in 1865.

Nicola Slade, Murder Most Welcome (2008), a humorous novel about a reformed thief who, believing herself widowed, goes to live with relations of her husband, a minor English aristocrat who reappears unexpectedly and is murdered shortly thereafter. Review

Joanna Campbell Slan, Death of a Schoolgirl (2012), a mystery featuring Jane Eyre, now Mrs. Rochester, as the sleuth who investigates the death of a schoolmate of Mr. Rochester's ward; #1 in the Jane Eyre Chronicles series.

Joanna Campbell Slan, Death of a Dowager (2013), a mystery featuring Charlotte Brontë's fictional heroine Jane Eyre, now Mrs. Rochester, investigating the death of her former rival's mother; #2 in the Jane Eyre Chronicles series.

Martin Cruz Smith, Rose (1996), a thriller about a man assigned to find a missing curate in a nineteenth century Lancashire coal-mining town.


Sally Spencer, A Rendezvous with Death (2003), about a Scotland Yard inspector who pursues the puzzling case of a body fished out of the Thames on the eve of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897; #1 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.

Sally Spencer, Blackstone and the Tiger (2004), about a Scotland Yard inspector investigating a series of kidnappings just before a visit to London by the maharajah of Chandrapore and his son; #2 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.

Sally Spencer, Blackstone and the Golden Egg (2005), about a Scotland Yard inspector sent to Russia to investigate the theft of a rare Faberge egg; #3 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.

Sally Spencer, Blackstone and the Firebug (2005), about a Scotland Yard inspector who must find an arsonist who seems intent on delivering a message with the fires he sets; #4 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.

Sally Spencer, Blackstone and the Balloon of Death (2006), about a Scotland Yard inspector who must solve the case of an actor murdered onstage with a poisoned dagger; #5 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.

Sally Spencer, Blackstone and the Heart of Darkness (2010), about a Scotland Yard inspector who goes to visit an old army friend in response to a worried letter and finds he has just been killed in what seems to be a freak accident; #6 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.

Sally Spencer, Blackstone and the New World (2010), about a Scotland Yard inspector who goes to New York to pick up a prisoner and finds himself helping to investigate a murder the New York police seem not to want to solve; #7 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.

Sally Spencer, Blackstone and the Wolf of Wall Street (2010), about a Scotland Yard inspector seconded to the New York Police Department who investigates the kidnapping of a reclusive millionare in 1900; #8 in the Inspector Sam Blackstone series.


Jack Steel, The Ripper Secret (2012), a thriller which imagines the Ripper murders were part of a search for a gold relic in the possession of the police commissioner.

D.J. Taylor, Kept: A Victorian Mystery (2006), a literary mystery set in the 1860s about a London police captain investigating the case of a mentally frail widow abducted by an odd naturalist after her husband dies in an apparent riding accident.

D. J. Taylor, Derby Day (2011), a mystery revolving around the racing horse Tiberius as Victorian London looks forward to the biggest horse race of the year. Review at The Independent


Will Thomas, Some Danger Involved (2004), about an enquiry agent and his new assistant who investigate the murder by crucifixion of a young scholar in Victorian London's Jewish quarter; #1 in the Barker and Llewelyn series. Review

Will Thomas, To Kingdom Come (2005), about an enquiry agent and his assistant in Victorian London who infiltrate a group of violent Irish dissidents; #2 in the Barker and Llewelyn series.

Will Thomas, The Limehouse Text (2006), about an enquiry agent and his assistant in Victorian London who investigate a Chinese killer using ancient martial arts illegal in England; #3 in the Barker and Llewelyn series.

Will Thomas, The Hellfire Conspiracy (2007), about an enquiry agent and his new assistant who investigate a serial killer of young women who may belong to the infamous Hellfire Club; #4 in the Barker and Llewelyn series.

Will Thomas, The Black Hand (2008), about an enquiry agent and his new assistant who investigate the murder of an Italian assassin which leads to a vendetta of rival Italian gangs; #5 in the Barker and Llewelyn series.


Brian Thompson, The Widow's Secret (2008), about a widow who takes revenge on the wicked by destroying them in print under a male pen name, and tries to solve the mystery of a murdered prostitute; #1 in the Bella Wallis mystery series.

Brian Thompson, The Captain's Table (2009; titled The Sailor's Ransom in the U.S.), about a widow who writes best-selling novels under a male pen name and agrees to help a friend of a friend in love with an heiress due to inherit a pearl necklace with a shady history; #2 in the Bella Wallis mystery series.

Brian Thompson, The Player's Curse (2010), about a novelist whose decides to get to the bottom of her fiancé's secrets; #3 in the Bella Wallis mystery series.

Peter Townsend, Ghostly Images (2012), about two apprentice photographers hired by a charlatan specializing in "spirit photography" who become involved in a murder investigation after they photograph women who become victims of a serial killer.

Christine Trent, Lady of Ashes (2013), about a London woman who works as an undertaker and suspects that several of the bodies she prepares may have been the victims of a serial killer.

Kate Williams, The Pleasures of Men (2012), about a young woman in Victorian London who moves into her uncle's strange house after she is orphaned, and begins writing about a series of gruesome murders.


Novels by and Inspired by Jane Austen

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Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (1811), about two sisters, one reserved and responsible, the other romantic and expressive, each hoping for a satisfying marriage; technically not a historical novel, since Austen's classic novels were set in her own time.

Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813), about a young woman who spurns the attentions of Mr. Darcy, a wealthy and attractive single man; technically not a historical novel, since Austen's classic novels were set in her own time.

Jane Austen, Mansfield Park (1814), about an orphaned young woman whose mother married for love, and who must live with wealthy relatives who consider her a poor relation; technically not a historical novel, since Austen's classic novels were set in her own time.

Jane Austen, Emma (1815), about a well-meaning young woman who meddles in the lives of others by trying to arrange their romances; technically not a historical novel, since Austen's classic novels were set in her own time.

Jane Austen, Persuasion (1817), about a woman who broke her engagement with a young naval officer because her relatives considered him a social inferior.

Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey (1817), about a romantic young woman who imagines dramatic situations because of her habit of reading Gothic novels; technically not a historical novel, since Austen's classic novels were set in her own time; published posthumously although it was the first novel she wrote.

Anonymous and Jane Austen, Sanditon: Jane Austen’s Last Novel Completed, a modern writer completes a story fragment by Jane Austen.

Jo Baker, Longbourn (2013), about the servants in the Bennet household from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Review

Julia Barrett, Jane Austen's Charlotte (2000), a completion of Jane Austen's unfinished last novel, Sanditon.

Joan Aiken, Emma Watson (1996), a completion of Jane Austen's unfinished novel The Watsons


Pamela Aidan, An Assembly Such as This, a retelling of Pride and Prejudice from Mr. Darcy’s viewpoint; #1 in the Darcy trilogy.

Pamela Aidan, Duty and Desire, a retelling of Pride and Prejudice from Mr. Darcy’s viewpoint; #2 in the Darcy trilogy.

Pamela Aidan, These Three Remain, a retelling of Pride and Prejudice from Mr. Darcy’s viewpoint; #3 in the Darcy trilogy.


Joan Aiken, Mansfield Park Revisited (1984; originally titled Mansfield Revisited), a sequel to Mansfield Park about Fanny Price's younger sister, who replaces her as Lady Bertram's companion after Fanny marries Edmund Bertram.

Joan Aiken, Jane Fairfax: The Secret Story of the Second Heroine in Jane Austen’s Emma (1990), a story spun off from Emma.

Joan Aiken, Eliza's Daughter (1994), about the free-spirited illegitimate child Eliza, befriended by poets Wordsworth and Coleridge during her jaunts about the countryside, and her quest to find out about her paraents; a sequel to Sense and Sensibility.

Joan Aiken, Lady Catherine's Necklace (2000), a sequel to Pride and Prejudice revolving around Lady Catherine de Bourgh.


Elizabeth Aston, Mr. Darcy’s Daughters, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice about the daughters of Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy; #1 in the Darcy series.

Elizabeth Aston, The Exploits and Adventures of Miss Alethea Darcy, the youngest daughter of Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy regrets having married; #2 in the Darcy series.

Elizabeth Aston, The True Darcy Spirit, Mr. Darcy’s artistic cousin tries to make a living as a painter while evading the unwelcome attentions of a lord; #3 in the Darcy series.

Elizabeth Aston, The Second Mrs. Darcy, the young widow of Captain Christopher Darcy returns to London to discover she is a wealthy woman; #4 in the Darcy series.

Elizabeth Aston, The Darcy Connection (2008), about the daughters of Mr. Collins and his wife Charlotte; #5 in the Darcy series.

Elizabeth Aston, Mr. Darcy's Dream (2009), about two unmarried girls visiting Pemberley as preparations for a ball are underway; #6 in the Darcy series.


Joan Austen-Leigh, A Visit to Highbury/Another View of Emma (1995), about some of the minor characters in Emma

Joan Austen-Leigh, Later Days at Highbury, about some of the minor characters in Emma

Janet Aylmer, Darcy’s Story, a retelling of Pride and Prejudice from Mr. Darcy’s perspective.

Ted and Marilyn Bader, Desire and Duty : A Sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1997), a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Ted Bader, Virtue and Vanity (2000), about the governess for Georgiana's children and the son of Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy; sequel to Desire and Duty.


Helen Baker, The Brothers by Jane Austen and Another Lady (2009), a novel which incorporates Jane Austen's unfinished ten-chapter draft of a novel she called The Brothers; self-published.

Helen Baker, The Watsons by Jane Austen and Another Lady (2008), a novel which incorporates Jane Austen's unfinished 18,000-word draft of a story she later abandoned; self-published.

Helen Baker, Playfulness (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Mansfield Park focusing on the story of Mary Crawford; self-published.

Helen Baker, The Book of Ruth (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in which Mary Bennet develops a husband-hunting plan for herself and Kitty based on the biblical Book of Ruth; self-published.

Helen Baker, Preciptation, a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice centering on Miss Caroline Bingley; self-published.

Helen Baker, Connivance (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Persuasion centering on the widow Mrs. Clay; self-published.

Helen Baker, Lady Susan Revived, a rewritten version of Lady Susan, the novel about a beautiful but scheming woman which Jane Austen wrote at age nineteen and never submitted for publication; self-published.

Helen Baker, Maria: Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey Continued, a sequel to Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey centering on John Thorpe; self-published.


Julia Barrett, Presumption: An Entertainment (1993), about Mr. Darcy’s sister Georgiana.

Linda Berdoll, Mr. Darcy Takes a Wife (originally published under the title The Bar Sinister), #1 in the author's series of spicy sequels to Pride and Prejudice.

Linda Berdoll, Darcy and Elizabeth: Nights and Days at Pemberley, #2 in the author's series of spicy sequels to Pride and Prejudice.

Rachel Billington, Emma and Knightley: Perfect Happiness in Highbury (2008), a sequel to Emma about the early married life of Emma and Mr. Knightley.

Diana Birchall, Mrs. Darcy’s Dilemma, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Dorothy Bonavia-Hunt, Pemberley Shades, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Sybil G. Brinton, Old Friends and New Fancies: An Imaginary Sequel to the Novels of Jane Austen, borrows characters from all six of Jane Austen’s novels.

Jean Burnett, Who Needs Mr. Darcy? (2012), about Jane Austen's character Lydia Wickham, now widowed.

Skylar Hamilton Burris, Conviction, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.


Rebecca Ann Collins, The Pemberley Chronicles (1997), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice about life at Pemberley after the Darcys' wedding; #1 in the Pemberley Chronicles series.

Rebecca Ann Collins, The Women of Pemberley (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice which follows the lives of five women into the early Victorian period; #2 in the Pemberley Chronicles series.

Rebecca Ann Collins, Netherfield Park Revisited (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice about the daughter of Elizabeth Bennett and Fitzwilliam Darcy; #3 in the Pemberley Chronicles series.

Rebecca Ann Collins, The Ladies of Longbourn (2008), about a young woman in the third generation of the Darcys and their neighbors in Victorian England; #4 in the Pemberley Chronicles series.

Rebecca Ann Collins, Mr. Darcy's Daughter (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice about the son of Charles and Jane Bingley; #5 in the Pemberley Chronicles series.

Rebecca Ann Collins, My Cousin Caroline (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice about Elizabeth Darcy's cousin Caroline Gardiner; #6 in the Pemberley Chronicles series.

Rebecca Ann Collins, Postscript from Pemberley (2008, new Sourcebooks edition 2009), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice about the generation of Mr. and Mrs. Darcy's grandchildren; #6 in the Pemberley Chronicles series. Review


Jane Dawkins, Letters from Pemberley: The First Year, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Jane Dawkins, More Letters from Pemberley: 1814-1819, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Joan Ellen Delman, Miss de Bourgh's Adventure, a short novel about one of the young women Mr. Darcy didn’t marry.

Joan Ellen Delman, Lovers' Perjuries; Or, the Clandestine Courtship of Jane Fairfax and Frank Churchill, a re-telling of Jane Austen's Emma.

Anne Fafoutakis, Mrs. Fitzwilliam Darcy and Other Stories, short stories about the Darcys’ marriage.

Monica Fairview, The Other Mr. Darcy (2009; available in the U.K., forthcoming in the U.S. in October 2009), about an unlikely romance between Caroline Bingley and Fitzwilliam Darcy's American cousin; a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

Marjorie Fasman, The Diary of Henry Fitzwilliam Darcy, the story of Pride and Prejudice from Mr. Darcy’s viewpoint.

Phyllis Furley, The Darcys : Scenes from Married Life, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Jane Gillespie, Aunt Celia, about the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Weston from Emma.

Jane Gillespie, Teverton Hall, about Charlotte from Pride and Prejudice.

Seth Grahame-Smith and Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2009), a send-up of Pride and Prejudice in which words and scenes are added to Austen's original text to create a tale of zombie mayhem. Review

Seth Grahame-Smith and Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters (2009), a send-up of Sense and Sensibility in which words and scenes are added to Austen's original text to create a tale of seaside horror.


Amanda Grange, Mr. Darcy's Diary (titled Darcy's Diary in hardback), the story of Pride and Prejudice from Mr. Darcy's perspective.

Amanda Grange, Dear Mr. Darcy (2012), a retelling of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in the form of letters written by Fitzwilliam Darcy.

Amanda Grange, Edmund Bertram’s Diary, the story of Mansfield Park from Edmund Bertram’s perspective.

Amanda Grange, Mr Knightley’s Diary, the story of Emma from Mr. Knightley’s perspective.

Amanda Grange, Captain Wentworth’s Diary, the story of Persuasion from Captain Wentworth's perspective.

Amanda Grange, Colonel Brandon's Diary (2008), the story of Sense and Sensibility from Colonel Brandon's perspective.

Amanda Grange, Wickham’s Diary (2011), a prequel to Pride and Prejudice about George Wickham, the impoverished and envious friend of the wealthy Fitzwilliam Darcy.

Amanda Grange, Henry Tilney's Diary (2011), a retelling of Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey from the perspective of Henry Tilney.


Helen Halstead, Mr. Darcy Presents His Bride (originally titled A Private Performance), a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Anne Hampson, Pemberley Place (1997), based on characters from Pride and Prejudice

Syrie James, The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen (2008), a novel that imagines events in Jane Austen’s life.

Syrie James, The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen (2013), a novel-within-a-novel about a modern woman who discovers a lost Austen manuscript, and the manuscript's content, a story about a village rector's daughter and her difficulties after she and her father are forced from their home. Note: This may

Regina Jeffers, Darcy’s Passions (2008), a version of Pride and Prejudice told from Mr. Darcy’s point of view.

Regina Jeffers, Darcy’s Dreams (2008), a sequel to Pride and Prejudice and Darcy's Passions; self-published.

Susan Kaye, None But You, the story of Persuasion from Frederick Wentworth’s point of view; #1 in the Frederick Wentworth, Captain series.

Susan Kaye, For You Alone, the story of Persuasion from Frederick Wentworth’s point of view; #2 in the Frederick Wentworth, Captain series.


Sharon Lathan, Two Shall Become One (2008), a steamy sequel to Pride and Prejudice about the honeymoon of Mr. and Mrs. Darcy; #1 in the Darcy Saga.

Sharon Lathan, Loving Mr. Darcy (2009), about Mr. and Mrs. Darcy as they enjoy the pleasures of the marriage bed and await the birth of their first child; #2 in the Darcy Saga.

Sharon Lathan, My Dearest Mr. Darcy (2010), about the birth of the Darcys' first child and their first wedding anniversary; #3 in the Darcy Saga.

Sharon Lathan, In the Arms of Mr. Darcy (2010), about Mr. and Mrs. Darcy a year after their wedding; #4 in the Darcy Saga.

Sharon Lathan, The Trouble with Mr. Darcy (2011), about the return of George Wickham, which endangers Mrs. Darcy and the baby, requiring Mr. Darcy to rescue them; #5 in the Darcy Saga.


Kara Louise, Pemberley’s Promise, a romance novel based on the characters from Pride and Prejudice; self-published.

Colleen McCullough, The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet (2008), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice about Elizabeth Bennet Darcy's apparently unmarriageable sister Mary, who has cared for her mother until, twenty years after the close of Pride and Prejudice, she is freed to pursue her own adventures. Review

Pamela Mingle, The Pursuit of Mary Bennet (2013), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in which Elizabeth's sister Mary goes to stay with the Darcys and meets a handsome, single gentleman who showers her with attention.

Nancy Moser, Just Jane, a biographical novel about the author Jane Austen.

Elizabeth Newark, The Darcys Give a Ball: A Gentle Joke, Jane Austen Style (2008), about Fitzwilliam Darcy’s younger brother.

Elizabeth Newark, Consequence; Or, Whatever Became of Charlotte Lucas (1997), about a minor character in Pride and Prejudice.

Jane Odiwe, Mr. Darcy’s Secret (2011), a Pride and Prejudice sequel in which Elizabeth tries to get to the bottom of gossip about Mr. Darcy's past.


Abigail Reynolds, Impulse and Initiative (2008), a novel that explores what might have happened if a character had made a different choice at one point in the Pride and Prejudice story; #1 in the Pemberley Variations series.

Abigail Reynolds, The Last Man in the World, A Pride and Prejudice Variation, a novel that explores what might have happened if a character had made a different choice at one point in the Pride and Prejudice story; #2 in the Pemberley Variations series.

Abigail Reynolds, Without Reserve, A Pride and Prejudice Variation, a novel that explores what might have happened if a character had made a different choice at one point in the Pride and Prejudice story; #3 in the Pemberley Variations series.

Abigail Reynolds, By Force of Instinct: A Pride & Prejudice Variation , a novel that explores what might have happened if a character had made a different choice at one point in the Pride and Prejudice story; #4 in the Pemberley Variations series.

Abigail Reynolds, From Lambton to Longbourn, A Pride and Prejudice Variation, a novel that explores what might have happened if a character had made a different choice at one point in the Pride and Prejudice story; #5 in the Pemberley Variations series.


Laurie Viera Rigler, Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict (2007), about a modern young woman who slips back into the time of Jane Austen and finds romance.

Laurie Viera Rigler, Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict (forthcoming in 2009), about a young woman from Regency England who slips forward into the modern world, where at first she relishes her freedom but then feels bewildered by the dating customs; sequel to Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict.

Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway, Lady Vernon and her Daughter (2009), a full-length novel based on Jane Austen's novella Lady Susan, about a mother and daughter left in dire financial straits when the father of the family dies and the son who inherits his money fails to support his mother and sister.

Patrice Sarath, The Unexpected Miss Bennet (2011), a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice centering on Elizabeth's shy and bookish younger sister Mary.

Juliette Shapiro, Excessively Diverted , a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Mary Street, The Confession of Fitzwilliam Darcy, the story of Pride and Prejudice told from Mr. Darcy’s point of view.

Emma Tennant, Pemberley, Or Pride and Prejudice Continued, a sequel to Pride and Prejudice.

Emma Tennant, An Unequal Marriage, picks up nineteen years after the close of Pride and Prejudice, with Mr. and Mrs. Darcy regretting their marriage.

Emma Tennant, Emma in Love (1996), four years after marrying Mr. Knightley, Emma becomes bored and starts matchmaking again.


Mysteries Inspired by Jane Austen

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Lindsay Ashford, The Mysterious Death of Miss Jane Austen (2013), a mystery which portrays Jane Austen's family governess suspecting that Austen was murdered.


Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor (1996), a fictional Jane Austen investigates the surprising death of the Earl of Scargrave; #1 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Man of the Cloth (1997), a fictional Jane Austen investigates the mysterious identity of a smuggler known as "the Reverend"; #2 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Wandering Eye (1998), a fictional Jane Austen investigates the shocking death of a theatre manager; #3 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Genius of the Place (1999), a fictional Jane Austen investigates a murder at the races; #4 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Stillroom Maid (2000), a fictional Jane Austen investigates a savage murder amid the beauty of the Derbyshire countryside; #5 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Prisoner of Wool House (2001), a fictional Jane Austen investigates a murder at sea; #6 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Ghosts of Netley (2003), a fictional Jane Austen investigates a suspected case of high treason that leads to murder; #7 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and His Lordship's Legacy (2005), a fictional Jane Austen receives an unusual legacy and stumbles across a corpse; #8 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Barque of Frailty (2006), a fictional Jane Austen investigates the murder of a beautiful Russian princess; #9 in the Jane Austen mystery series.

Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron (2010), a fictional Jane Austen investigates the death of a beautiful young woman in Lord Byron's room at a Brighton resort; #10 in the Jane Austen mystery series.


Carrie Bebris, Pride and Prescience (2004), newlyweds Mr. and Mrs. Darcy turn sleuth when various spooky and fatal incidents mar Caroline Bingley's wedding plans; #1 in the Mr. and Mrs. Darcy mystery series.

Carrie Bebris, Suspense and Sensibility (2005), when Mr. and Mrs. Darcy arrange a marriage for her sister Kitty, an alarming and potentially fatal puzzle ensues; #2 in the Mr. and Mrs. Darcy mystery series.

Carrie Bebris, North by Northanger (2006), when Mr. Darcy and the pregnant Mrs. Darcy are invited to Northanger Abbey, secrets from the past arise to bedevil their visit; #3 in the Mr. and Mrs. Darcy mystery series

Carrie Bebris, The Matters at Mansfield (2008), after the birth of their first child, Mr. and Mrs. Darcy visit Mansfield Park, where they must track down a murderer; #4 in the Mr. and Mrs. Darcy mystery series.


The European Continent in the 19th Century (plus Iceland)

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Sholem Aleichem, Wandering Stars (1910), a love story about the daughter of a poor cantor and the son of a rich man who run away from a Jewish shtetl at the end of the nineteenth century to join a traveling theater company; technically not historical fiction.

K.J. Anderson, Captain Nemo: The Fantastic History of a Dark Genius (2002), about the young Jules Verne and his two best friends, a poor shipbuilder's son and a wealthy merchant's daughter.

Alla Avilova, Revelation of Fire (published 1998 in Russian; 2008 in English), about a fictional 200-year-old manuscript with links to many important developments in Russian history beginning in 1870 when the first socialists appeared.

David Ball, Empires of Sand, set in nineteenth century Paris and the Sahara Desert.

Julian Barnes, Flaubert’s Parrot, a literary novel about an amateur Flaubert scholar trying to track down a stuffed parrot that belonged to the nineteenth century French author.

Alessandro Baricco, Silk, a nineteenth century Frenchman has an affair while in Japan trying to buy silkworm eggs.

Sarah Bayliss, Utrillo's Mother (1987), about the late nineteenth century Parisian artist Suzanne Valadon, whose reputation was eclipsed by that of her son, Maurice Utrillo.

Eric Berbig, The People's Will (2010), a thriller about a Russian homicide detective ordered by the secret police to track down a cell of terrorists bent on assassinating the tsar; self-published.

Peter Brooks, The Emperor’s Body (2011), about a man who joins the 1840 French expedition to bring Napoleon's body back from St. Helena, and the woman he leaves behind in France.

Cathy Marie Buchanan, The Painted Girls (2012), about Marie van Goethem, who modeled for Edgar Degas’s bronze sculpture "Little Dancer Aged 14," and her sister.

Tom Bullough, Konstantin, (2012), about Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, a Russian boy who lost his hearing in 1867 at age ten but went on to teach himself science and discover the possibility of space travel.

Sheramy Bundrick, Sunflowers (2009), about a young prostitute who falls in love with the artist Vincent van Gogh during the last two years of his life. Review

Peter Carey, Parrot and Olivier in America (2010), about a traumatized survivor of the French Revolution whose parents send him to America in the company of a servant who survived an Australian penal colony; a fictionalized version of the story of Alexis de Tocqueville. Review by Ursula K. Le Guin at The Guardian

Maud Casey, The Man Who Walked Away (2014), about the doctor in a nineteenth-century Bordeaux asylum and a man who arrives there after compulsively walking with no clear idea of why; loosely based on the story of psychiatric patient Albert Dadas.

C. John Coombes, Claus: A Christmas Incarnation: The Child (2000), an adult Christmas story that begins in Scandinavia and ends on the American frontier in the early nineteenth century; self-published ebook.

C. John Coombes, Claus: A Christmas Incarnation: The Woman (2009), sequel to Claus; self-published ebook.

Stephanie Cowell, Claude and Camille (2010), about the French Impressionist artist Claude Monet and his first wife Camille Doncieux. Review or Author Interview

Jill Dawson, Wild Boy (2003), about an autistic boy found running wild in the woods in the years after the French Revolution and brought to Paris by a young doctor who studies him while training him to live in civilized society.

Tatiana de Rosnay, The House I Loved, (2012), about a woman who resists the forced rebuilding of her Paris neighborhood in the 1860s by hiding in the cellar and, in the process, comes to terms with a secret she has carried for many years.

Patrick Deville, Plague and Cholera (2012 in the original French; first English edition 2014), about the Frenchman Alexander Yersin, who discovered the plague bacteria and developed a vaccine for it in the late nineteenth century, and his flight from Paris in 1940. Review at The Guardian

Guiseppe di Lampedusa, The Leopard (1958), about a middle-aged Sicilian prince during the 1860s during the decline of the aristocracy amid Garibaldi's unification of Italy. The author died in 1957 after publishers had rejected this novel, his only one; it was published the following year, stirring controversy and winning critical acclaim.

Gioia Diliberto, I Am Madame X, about the artist John Singer Sargent, the beautiful Paris socialite he painted in a low-cut black dress in 1884, and the controversy over the painting that ruined her reputation.

Bruce Duffy, Disaster Was My God (2011), a biographical novel about the nineteenth-century French poet Arthur Rimbaud, whose passionate, turmoil-filled life ended when he was thirty-seven.

Susanne Dunlap, Liszt’s Kiss, about a sheltered young woman pianist during a cholera epidemic in nineteenth century Paris.

Umberto Eco, The Prague Cemetery (2011), a novel which imagines that one man produced the forged document, "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion," purportedly the work of a power-mongering Jewish conspiracy, which set off a wave of anti-Semitism in nineteenth-century Europe.

Arabella Edge, The God of Spring (titled The Raft in the U.K.), a literary novel about an early nineteenth century French artist who paints a shipwreck.

Selden Edwards, The Little Book (2008), about a California man who suddenly finds himself transported from 1988 San Francisco to 1897 Vienna.

Sebastian Faulks, A Possible Life (2013), a collection of five novellas set in various times and places from nineteenth-century France to Italy in 2029, loosely linked through their themes about the way people's choices affect their life trajectories. Review at The Washington Post

Rachel Field, All This, and Heaven Too (1938), about the young governess Henriette Deluzy-Desportes, who takes a job with the Duc and Duchesse de Choiseul-Praslin and a few years later finds herself at the center of a scandalous murder trial; based on historical events. Review

Filip Florian, The Days of the King (2011), a comic novel about a Prussian dentist who travels to Bucharest in 1866 with a captain of dragoons who is about to become the King of Romania.

Jon Fosse, Melancholy (1995), about the nineteenth century Norwegian landscape painter Lars Hertervig and his struggle with mental illness.

Laurent Gaudé, The House of Scorta, a family saga set in a small village in Italy, beginning in the late nineteenth century.

David Gibbins, The Mask of Troy (2010), about Heinrich Schliemann, the German archaeologist who discovered Troy in 1876, clues found in Germany in 1845 about antiquities looted by the Nazis, and a present-day marine archaeologist who discovers a shipwrecked galley that could be from Agamemnon's fleet.

Natalia Ginzburg, The Manzoni Family (1983 in the original Italian; English edition 1987), about the nineteenth-century Italian novelist Alessandro Manzoni and his family. Review at the LA Times

Noah Gordon, La Bodega (2000; apparently available only in Spanish and Catalan editions), about the second son of a Spanish vineyard owner who becomes caught up in the Carlist War.

Eliza Granville, Gretel and the Dark (2014), about a girl who becomes the patient of psychoanalyst Josef Breuer in 1899 Vienna, and a girl in Nazi Germany who escapes her troubles by remembering the fairy tales her nurse has told her.

Hella Haasse, The Tea Lords (1992 in the original Dutch, English translation 2010), about a young Dutch planter who establishes his own tea plantation in Java. Review

Ron Hansen, Exiles (2008), about the Jesuit seminarian Gerard Manley Hopkins and the 1875 shipwreck of a steamship with five exiled nuns aboard which goaded him to become a poet.

Kristen Harnisch, The Vintner's Daughter (2014), about a young French woman, the daughter of a Loire Valley winemaker, who travels to California after her father dies and the family's vineyard is sold to a rival family.

Robert Harris, An Officer And A Spy (2014), about Georges Picquart, a French official who, after evidence of government deception emerges, begins to regret his role in the prosecution of Alfred Dreyfus as a German spy.

Zsolt Harsanyi, Immortal Franz (titled Hungarian Rhapsody in the U.K.), a biographical novel about the Hungarian-born piano virtuoso and composer Franz Liszt. Review

Stella K. Hershan, The Naked Angel (1973), about Count Metternich’s affair with Princess Bagration in nineteenth century Austria.

Elizabeth Hickey, The Painted Kiss (2005), about a student of the controversial Viennese artist Gustav Klimt and the romantic relationship that develops between them.

Frederick Highland, The Ghost Eater, an adventure story about an American riverboat captain in late nineteenth century Dutch Sumatra.

Dara Horn, The World to Come (2006), about the modern-day theft of a Marc Chagall painting and about the young artist himself, a Russian Jew who lived and worked in France during the early twentieth century.

Simonetta Agnello Hornby, The Nun (2012), about an Italian woman forced to become a nun after a journey to Naples who continues to correspond with the ship captain who befriended her.

Dan Jacobson, All For Love (2005), about Princess Louise (the daughter of Leopold II of Belgium), banished from the Hapsburg capital, Vienna, for leaving her husband to pursue an affair with a cavalry officer.

Christian Jacq, Champollion the Egyptian, about the nineteenth century Frenchman who first deciphered hieroglyphics and traveled to Egypt to safeguard the treasures in the Egyptian tombs.

Carsten Jensen, We the Drowned (2010), about a group of Danes who go to sea in 1848 and experience trials that will haunt four generations. Review at the Washington Post

Mór Jókai, The Baron's Sons: A Romance of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848 (original Hungarian edition 1879, first English edition 1900), about an aristocratic Hungarian family during the revolutionary uprisings of 1848; a classic rather than true historical fiction.

Mór Jókai, A Hungarian Nabob (1853), about a wealthy Hungarian aristocrat who marries a young girl in order to foil his scheming heir.

Lillian Kayte, Vitebskii (2010), about a Jewish family in Vitebsk, Russia, which falls apart after most of the family emigrates to America, leaving one son behind, and the other children become completely assimilated and scatter after the mother dies; self-published.

Hannah Kent, Burial Rites (2013), about Agnes Magnúsdóttir, the last person to be executed in Iceland, after she is convicted of murder in 1828 and held over the winter on the farm of the district officer, a relation of one of the murdered men. Review
(Note: The mid-Atlantic island nation of Iceland is not, of course, part of the European Continent, but it was under Danish rule in the nineteenth century, so this seems the best page for a novel set in nineteenth-century Iceland.)

Kathe Koja, Under the Poppy (2010), about a man and woman in 1870s Brussels who own a brothel together which is forced to house soldiers when war looms.

Andrew Krivak, The Sojourn (2011), about a boy who returns to Austria-Hungary with his father from a Colorado mining town, becomes a sharpshooter during World War I, and struggles to return to a normal family life.

Rosalind Laker, Brilliance, about a love affair in the late nineteenth century Paris film industry.

Pierre La Mure, Clair de Lune (1962), a biographical novel about the French composer Claude Debussy.

Pierre La Mure, Moulin Rouge (1950), about the nineteenth century French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

Mary Lancaster, A World to Win, set during the 1848 Hungarian Revolution.

J.D. Landis, Longing, about the composer Robert Schumann and his pianist wife.

Catherine LaRoche, Knight of Love (2014), historical romance about a young woman who escapes her sadistic fiancé and resists the charms of her rescuer, an aristocrat siding with the rebels during the 1848 Revolution in Germany. Review

Mario Vargas Llosa, The Way to Paradise (2003), about the contrasting but similar lives of artist Paul Gauguin and the Peruvian grandmother he never knew, Flora Tristan.

Michael Llewellyn, Creole Son (2012), about French artist Edgar Degas and his 1872 trip to New Orleans, where his Creole mother was born and he finds his relatives living in a city in crisis.

Elizabeth Lord, A Secret Inheritance (2008), about a Frenchwoman who, after her father's funeral, searches for the truth about his stories about a secret inheritance.

Karen Mack and Jennifer Kaufman, Freud's Mistress (2013), about the love affair between Sigmund Freud and his wife's sister.

James MacManus, Black Venus (2014), about the French poet Charles Baudelaire and his lover Jeanne Duval, a Haitian cabaret singer.

Robert Masello, Blood and Ice (2009), historical vampire fantasy about a contemporary journalist who discovers a man and a woman frozen into a block of ice in Antarctica, whose story goes back to the Crimean War.

Jason C. Mavrovitis, Remember Us, a novel based on the lives of the authors' Bulgarian ancestors, beginning in the late nineteenth century during the collapse of the Ottoman Empire; self-published.

Jude Morgan, Symphony (2007), about the nineteenth century French composer Berlioz and the actress who was his muse.

Kate Mosse, Sepulchre (2008), spooky historical fantasy about a young woman in 1891 Paris who lives in the same apartment as the composer Claude Debussy, and a modern woman researching both the composer and her own ancestry.

Lilian Nattel, The River Midnight (1999), about a free-spirited midwife in a fictional Jewish village in Poland in 1894.

Robin Oliveira, I Always Loved You (2014), a novel which imagines the relationship American artist Mary Cassatt and French artist Edgar Degas might have had after meeting in Belle Époque Paris.

Alyson Richman, The Last Van Gogh (2006), a love story set in 1890 about the artist Van Gogh in the despairing last months of his life and the twenty-one-year-old daughter of his doctor, who flirts with him as he paints her.

Elizabeth Robards, With Violets (2005), a romantic novel exploring the possibility that the impressionist painters Edouard Manet and Berthe Morisot may have been lovers.

M.J. Rose, Seduction (2013), about a present-day French mythologist who travels to Jersey to study transcripts of seánces held by novelist Victor Hugo during his stay there in the 1850s.

Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March (1932), about three generations of an Austrian family after one of them saves the life of Emperor Franz Josef on the battlefield in 1859 and is ennobled on the spot.

Anne Rouen, Master of Illusion (2013), about a ballerina in nineteenth-century France who rescues a disfigured genius with amnesia; self-published.

Jack Salem, Pausing For A Backward Glance (2012), a dual-time-period novel about writers and artists affected by the Dreyfus Affair in the late nineteenth century, and the effect of the the House Un-American Activities investigation on Hollywood in the 1950s; self-published.

Esmeralda Santiago, Conquistadora (2011), about a convent-educated Spanish woman who, fascinated by her ancestors from Puerto Rico, marries a man who owns a sugar plantation there with his twin brother.

Jose Saramago, Raised from the Ground (1980 in the original Portuguese; first English edition 2012), about a peasant family in Portugal and two generations of their descendents beginning in the late nineteenth century. Review at the New York Times

Pamela Schoenewaldt, When We Were Strangers (2011), about a young seamstress who must leave her mountain village in Italy after her mother's death to make a new life for herself in America.

Joseph Shearing, Forget-Me-Not (1932; also titled Lucile Clery, a Woman of Intrigue; the author, Gabrielle Margaret Campbell Long, also used the pen name Marjorie Bowen), about a governess involved in a scandal after her employer's wife is murdered; based on the true story of Henriette Deluzy-Desportes.

Joseph Skibell, A Curable Romantic (2010), a humorous literary novel about a man who falls in love with one of Freud's patients. Review

Eva Stachniak, Garden of Venus (2005, titled Dancing with Kings in the U.K.), about Sophie Potocka, who was born the daughter of a poor Greek peasant, became the toast of Europe as a courtesan, and eventually married a wealthy Polish count.

Irving Stone, The Passions of the Mind (1971), a biographical novel about Sigmund Freud, the Austrian founder of psychoanalysis.

Irving Stone, The Greek Treasure (1975), about Heinrich Schliemann, who discovered and excavated the site of Troy.

Colm Toibin, The Master (2004), about the nineteenth century American expatriate author Henry James and his life among the artists and writers of Paris, Rome, Venice and London.

Jonathan Tulloch, A Winding Road (2009), a thriller that weaves together stories about characters in three time periods: the last years of artist Vincent Van Gogh; a German folklorist coerced by the Nazis into writing propaganda; and a present day art expert confronted with what may be a lost Van Gogh masterpiece.

Linda Urbach, Madame Bovary’s Daughter (2011), a novel which imagines a career in Paris couture for the daughter of the central characer in Gustave Flaubert's classic novel Madame Bovary. Review at NY Journal of Books

Peter Vansittart, Hermes in Paris (2000), about the Greek trickster god Hermes, who visits Paris during the reign of Napoleon III and his empress Eugenie to play a joke.

Mariolina Venezia, Been Here a Thousand Years (2009, titled Here for a Thousand Years in the U.K.), about an eccentric, poor Italian family from the 1860s through the 1980s.

Susan Vreeland, Luncheon of the Boating Party (2007), about the men and women the nineteenth century French artist Renoir portrayed in his famous impressionist painting.

Susan Vreeland, Life Studies (2004), short stories about artists and the people their art touches, most but not all set in the nineteenth century Impressionist and Post-Impressionist periods.

Carey Wallace, The Blind Contessa's New Machine (2010), about a young Italian contessa who realizes she is going blind and, after her husband refuses to believe her, falls in love with an inventor who does and creates the world's first typewriter for her.

Carol Wallace, Leaving Van Gogh (2011), about Paul Gachet, the doctor who cared for the troubled artist Vincent van Gogh in the last months of his life after he moves to the rural French town of Auvers-sur-Oise.

Sylvia Townsend Warner, Summer Will Show (1936), about a British woman who travels to Paris in 1848 after her children die, and falls in love with another woman.

David Weiss, Naked Came I (1963), about the nineteenth century French sculptor Auguste Rodin.

Max White, The Midnight Gardener (1948), about the French poet Charles Baudelaire.

Sally Zigmond, Chasing Angels (2006), about Henriette d'Angeville, the daughter of French aristocrats who survived the Revolution, and her climb up Mont Blanc in 1838.

Richard Zimler, Hunting Midnight (2004), about a man in early nineteenth century Portugal who discovers he is secretly descended from Portuguese Jews, who travels in search of his friend Midnight, a black man betrayed, sold as a slave, and sent to America.


Mysteries: 19th Century European Continent

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Boris Akunin, The Winter Queen (2003), about a Russian gentleman who investigates the suicide of a young law student in Moscow's Alexander Gardens; #1 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series. Review

Boris Akunin, Turkish Gambit (2004), after his capture by the Turks, a Russian gentleman soldier investigates a devious plot; #2 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series.

Boris Akunin, Murder on the Leviathan (2004; also titled Leviathan), about a Russian gentleman sleuth competing with a French detective to find out who murdered an Englishman in Paris; #3 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series.

Boris Akunin, The Death of Achilles (2005), about a Russian gentleman who investigates the death of his old friend, a famous Russian general; #4 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series

Boris Akunin, Special Assignments (2007), about a Russian gentleman on the trail of a serial killer; #5 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series

Boris Akunin, The State Counsellor (2008), about a Russian gentleman who investigates the murder of the governor-general of Siberia; #6 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series

Boris Akunin, The Coronation (2009), about a Russian detective who must investigate the kidnapping of a grand duke's child during the 1894 celebration of the last Tsar's coronation; #7 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series.

Boris Akunin, She Lover of Death (2009), about a Russian detective who infiltrates a secret society linked to a wave of suicides; #8 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series.

Boris Akunin, He Lover of Death (2010), about a Russian detective who must solve the mystery of a boy in a criminal gang and the beautiful woman he loves, nicknamed "Death" because of the short life spans of her lovers; #9 in the Erast Fandorin mystery series.


Boris Akunin, Sister Pelagia and the White Bulldog (2006), about a nineteenth century Russian nun who finds her investigation of a pet bulldog's death complicated by a pair of human murders; #1 in the Sister Pelagia mystery series.

Boris Akunin, Sister Pelagia and the Black Monk (2007), about a nineteenth century Russian nun who has difficulty investigating the mysterious deaths in a monastery because women are not allowed in its precincts; #2 in the Sister Pelagia mystery series.

Boris Akunin, Pelagia and the Red Rooster (2008; titled Sister Pelagia and the Red Cockerel in the U.S.), about a nineteenth century Russian nun investigating a self-proclaimed prophet amid a series of sinister events, from murder to miracles; #3 in the Sister Pelagia mystery series.


Louis Bayard, The Black Tower (2008), a literary thriller about a French police detective in 1818 who suspects that the son of Louis XIV and Marie Antoinette, believed to have died after the Revolution, may still be alive. Review

Ann Dukthas, The Prince Lost to Time, about a time-traveling Jesuit in 1815 France investigating the mystery behind the death of Charles, the son of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette; Nicholas Segalla mystery series #2; Ann Dukthas is a pen name of Paul (P.C.) Doherty.

Ann Dukthas, The Time of Murder at Mayerling, about a time-travelling Jesuit in 1899 Austria investigating the mystery behind the death of the Hapsburg Prince Rudolph; Nicholas Segalla mystery series #3; Ann Dukthas is a pen name of Paul (P.C.) Doherty


Teresa Grant, Vienna Waltz (2011), about a diplomat's wife in Vienna with her husband during the negotiations following Napoleon's defeat who is summoned to a Russian princess's rooms where she finds her husband with the princess's bloody corpse; #1 in the Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch mystery series (which follows the Melanie and Charles series, published under the pen name Tracy Grant, in which the main characters had different names).

Teresa Grant, Imperial Scandal (2012), about a married couple who spy for the British in Brussels after Napoleon escapes from Elba; #2 in the Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch mystery series.

Teresa Grant, His Spanish Bride (2012), about the courtship and marriage of a couple who spy for the British during the Peninsular War; a prequel and #3 in the Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch mystery series.

Teresa Grant, The Paris Affair (2013), about a married couple who spy for the British in post-Waterloo Paris; #4 in the Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch mystery series.

Teresa Grant, The Paris Plot (2014), about a married couple who spied for the British in Paris during the Napoleonic Wars, and are now the targets of threats as they await the birth of their second child; #5 in the Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch mystery series.

Teresa Grant, The Berkeley Square Affair (2014), about an upper-class English couple who are drawn back into their former work as spies when a friend is robbed and nearly murdered; #6 in the Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch mystery series.


Claude Izner, Murder on the Eiffel Tower (2008), about a young bookseller who investigates an unlikely death on the newly built Eiffel Tower during the 1889 Universal Exposition; #1 in the Victor Legris mystery series.

Claude Izner, The Disappearance at Père-Lachaise (2010), about a French bookseller who investigates the disappearance of his one-time lover in the cemetery where her husband is buried; #2 in the Victor Legris mystery series.

Claude Izner, The Montmartre Investigation (2010), about a French bookseller who, after a goatherd delivers a red shoe to his shop, begins investigating the murder of a barefoot woman in a red dress; #3 in the Victor Legris mystery series.

Claude Izner, The Assassin in the Marais (2011), about a French bookseller who investigates after a goblet is stolen from his business partner, which appears to be connected to two murders, as anarchists spread terror in 1892 Paris; #4 in the Victor Legris mystery series.

Claude Izner, In the Shadows of Paris (2012), about a Paris bookseller who investigates the murder of a bookbinder; #5 in the Victor Legris mystery series.

Claude Izner, Strangled in Paris (2013), about a Paris bookseller who investigates the strangling death of a poor but well-dressed woman; #6 in the Victor Legris mystery series.


J. Sydney Jones, The Empty Mirror (2009), about a Jewish lawyer in 1898 Vienna who investigates the murder of a woman who modeled for Gustav Klimt, whom the police suspect of killing her; #1 in the Karl Werthen series. Review

J. Sydney Jones, Requiem in Vienna (2010), about a Jewish lawyer's 1899 investigation into a series of fatal and potentially fatal "accidents" plaguing composer Gustav Mahler; #2 in the Karl Werthen series. Review or Author Interview

J. Sydney Jones, The Silence (2011), about a Jewish lawyer's investigation into the suicide of a Vienna councilman, possibly connected to the disappearance of the eldest son of wealthy industrialist Karl Wittgenstein; #3 in the Karl Werthen series.


R.N. Morris, The Gentle Axe, about a new case of murder investigated by the fictional St. Petersburg police detective from Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment”.

R.N. Morris, A Vengeful Longing, about a nineteenth century Russian police inspector investigating a case of poisoning during a hot St. Petersburg summer; #2 in the St. Petersburg mystery series.

R.N. Morris A Razor Wrapped in Silk, about a nineteenth-century Russian police inspector investigating two crimes which may be connected: the kidnapping of a child factory worker and the murder of a beautiful society woman; #3 in the St. Petersburg mystery series.

R.N. Morris The Cleansing Flames (2011), about a Russian police inspector investigating a group of intellectuals who favor revolution during the spring of 1872; #4 in the St. Petersburg mystery series.


Michael Pearce, Dmitri and the Milk-Drinkers (1997), about a reform-minded lawyer of Scottish-Russian descent who must find a beautiful young woman the officials of Tsarist Russia have "lost;" #1 in the Dmitri Kameron series.

Michael Pearce, Dmitri and the One-Legged Lady (1999), about a reform-minded lawyer of Scottish-Russian descent who must find a missing icon in Tsarist Russia; #2 in the Dmitri Kameron series.


Barbara Corrado Pope, Cézanne's Quarry (2008), about an inexperienced young magistrate whose investigation of the murder of a young woman in Aix-en-Provence, France, suggests she may have been killed by the artist Paul Cézanne; #1 in the Bernard Martin series. Review or Author Interview

Barbara Corrado Pope, The Blood of Lorraine (2010), about a young magistrate in southern France who, amid the tensions following the Dreyfus affair, must solve the murder of a small child that is being blamed on the Jews; #2 in the Bernard Martin series.

Barbara Corrado Pope, The Missing Italian Girl (2013), about a young magistrate and his wife who try to find two immigrant girls from the Paris slums who have disappeared; #3 in the Bernard Martin series.


Kate Taylor, A Man in Uniform (2011), a mystery about an attorney recruited by a mysterious and attractive young widow to appeal the French government's case against Albert Dreyfus.

Bob van Laerhoven, Baudelaire’s Revenge (2014), about a Paris police commissioner and his assistant who must solve a series of murders in 1870 related to Baudelaire's poems.

Andrew Williams, To Kill a Tsar (2010), about a Moscow physician whose work involves him in the investigation of an 1879 attempt to assassinate Tsar Alexander II.


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