Novels of the Eighteenth Century

For news on the latest reviews, author interviews and additions to this website, see the blog. Novels for young people set in the 17th century appear on the YA 17th Century page.

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The British and Irish in the 18th Century
Mysteries and Thrillers: 18th Century Britain
Continental Europe in the 18th Century
Mysteries and Thrillers: 18th Century European Continent
North America in the 18th Century
Mysteries and Thrillers: 18th Century North America

Marie Antoinette

During the eighteenth century the British Isles, Continental Europe and North America were scenes of enormous change. The American and French Revolutions were epochal events that have spawned much historical fiction. The glamorous and extravagant Marie Antoinette, in particular, has fascinated novelists. In England, Monarchists and Parliamentarians turned to political maneuvering rather than civil war to resolve their conflicts. Scotland became part of Great Britain with the Act of Union in 1707, but Jacobite risings sought to restore Scottish independence until in 1746 the Battle of Culloden finally crushed attempts to make "Bonnie Prince Charlie" king of an independent Scotland.

Novels about immigrants are generally listed under the country in which the immigrant characters settled, unless the majority of the novel is set in their original homeland. Novels about Napoleon and his family and novels set during the Napoleonic Wars are listed on the Napoleonic Era page. Series novels about naval warfare and seafaring are also listed there if some novels in the series are set during the Napoleonic Wars.


The British and Irish in the 18th Century

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Jump to: Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series


Peter Ackroyd, Hawksmoor (1993), a literary novel about a modern London detective and an eighteenth century architect

Peter Ackroyd, The Lambs of London (2004), about the essayist Charles Lamb, his sister Mary, and a young bookseller who claims to have discovered a book once owned by Shakespeare.

Ralph Arnold, Northern Lights: The Story of Lord Derwentwater , about the 1715 Jacobite rising and its disastrous aftermath for the Derwentwater family.

Helen Ashton, Footman in Powder (1954), about a footman in the service of the Prince of Wales (later George IV) who is privy to numerous royal scandals.

Martine Bailey, An Appetite for Violets (2014), about a servant girl with a passion for cooking whose mistress decides to use her in a risky scheme. Review

Beryl Bainbridge, According to Queeney (2000), about Dr. Samuel Johnson, the eighteenth century English author who published an early dictionary of the English language, from the perspective of the daughter of a couple who befriended him during the last two decades of his life.


James Barke, The Wind that Shakes the Barley (1947), about the Scottish poet Robert Burns; #1 in the Story of Robert Burns quintet.

James Barke, The Song in the Green Thorn Tree (1948), about the Scottish poet Robert Burns; #2 in the Story of Robert Burns quintet.

James Barke, The Wonder of All the Gay World (1949), about the Scottish poet Robert Burns; #3 in the Story of Robert Burns quintet.

James Barke, The Crest of the Broken Wave (1953), about the Scottish poet Robert Burns; #4 in the Story of Robert Burns quintet.

James Barke, The Well of the Silent Harp (1954), about the Scottish poet Robert Burns; #5 in the Story of Robert Burns quintet.


Philip Baruth, The Brothers Boswell (2009), about the young James Boswell, eager to deepen his acquaintance with the eminent dictionary-compiler Dr. Samuel Johnson, and his murderously resentful younger brother John Boswell.

Alex Beecroft, False Colors (2009), an adventure/romance novel about a married man who goes to sea in 1762, where he encounters a man who is attracted only to other men, and gradually becomes aware that this is his nature, as well.

Charlotte Betts, The Chateau on the Lake (2014), about a half-English, half-French woman visiting France for the first time in search of her relatives as the Revolution begins and France declares war on England.

Jessica Blair, Secrets of a Whitby Girl (2011), about an old woman who lets her great-niece read her diaries, which reveal numerous dark family secrets about their life in the Yorkshire whaling town of Whitby and at sea.

Jane Borodale, The Book of Fires (2009; available in the U.S. January 2010), about an unmarried young woman who runs away to London after she becomes pregnant, where she becomes an assistant to a firework-maker. Review

George Bowering, Burning Water (1980), about Captain George Vancouver's voyage of discovery to the Pacific Northwest of the American continent, blending accurate details of the voyage with imaginative fiction.

John Boyne, Mutiny on the Bounty (2008; titled Mutiny: A Novel of the Bounty in the U.S.), about the famous mutiny on HMS Bounty from the perspective of a fourteen boy who joins the crew rather than be sent to prison.

D.K. Broster, The Flight of the Heron (1925), about a young Highland chieftain who supports Charles Stuart during the Jacobite rebellion, and his friendship with an English soldier who fights for his enemies; #1 in the Jacobite trilogy.

D.K. Broster, A Gleam in the North (1927), about a Highland chieftain who supported the Jacobite rebellion, and returns home from exile after it fails and tries to live a quiet life; #2 in the Jacobite trilogy.

D.K. Broster, The Dark Mile (1929), about a Highland chieftain's search for the man who betrayed his cousin during the turmoil after the Jacobite rebellion; #3 in the Jacobite trilogy.

Carrie Brown, The Stargazer’s Sister (2016), about astronomer Caroline Herschel, sister of the great composer and astronomer William Herschel.

Michael Brown, William and Lucy (2011), a novel based on William Wordsworth's poem "She Dwelt Among The Untrodden Ways" which imagines its origin in a love affair between Wordsworth and a young woman working as a nanny and aspiring to become an artist; self-published.

John Buchan, A Lost Lady of Old Years (1899), about a man who joins the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 after he meets the beautiful wife of Prince Charles's secretary.

John Buchan, Midwinter (1923), about a Scottish supporter of Prince Charles who sets out on a secret mission in the west of England to gain support for the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745.

Tracy Chevalier, Burning Bright, about a pair of children who become friends with the radical poet William Blake in eighteenth century London.

Edward Chupack, Silver, a darkly humorous tale of adventure and murder at sea narrated by the fictional pirate Long John Silver of Robert Louis Stevenson's nineteenth century classic Treasure Island.

Clare Clark, The Nature of Monsters, about a sixteen-year-old pregnant girl who goes to an apothecary for an abortion in exchange for a year as his maid, and finds herself in mysteriously threatening circumstances.

Richard Condon, The Abandoned Woman (1977), about Queen Caroline, the wife of George IV.

Bernard Cornwell, Fallen Angels, an adventure novel about an English family during the time of the French Revolution; Cornwell originally published this under the pen name Susannah Kells.

Marele Day, Mrs. Cook: The Real and Imagined Life of the Captain's Wife (2002), about the wife of the eighteenth century voyager James Cook, who traveled with him in her imagination as, over the years, she lost each of her six children.

Michael Dean, I, Hogarth (2013), about the London artist William Hogarth.

Eilis Dillon, Wild Geese (1980), about an Irish Catholic brother and sister sent to France in 1779 to try to claim an inheritance from unpleasant relations who have taken it over. Review at Reading the Past

Eilis Dillon, Citizen Burke (1984), about an Irish Catholic priest in post-Revolutionary France.

Emma Donoghue, Life Mask (2004), about an actress who moves in political circles in 1790s London.

Emma Donoghue, Slammerkin (2000), about a lower class English girl who becomes caught up in a life of prostitution.

John Drake, Flint and Silver (2009), a prequel to Treasure Island for adult readers.

John Drake, Pieces of Eight (2009), about the deadly rivalry between two pirates for control of an island and a fortune in buried treasure; sequel to Flint and Silver.

Samuel Edwards, The Scimitar (1955), about an English agent who helps Prince Eugene of Austria defeat the Ottomans in 1717; Samuel Edwards is a pen name of Noel B. Gerson.

Janet Ellis, The Butcher’s Hook (2016), about a girl from a wealthy London family who falls in love with a butcher's apprentice and is willing to defy her parents to marry him.

Amanda Elyot, All For Love: The Scandalous Life and Times of Royal Mistress Mary Robinson, a bawdy novel about an eighteenth century Englishwoman who went from debtor's prison to the stage to an affair with the Prince of Wales.

Barbara Ewing, The Fraud (2009), about an Italian portrait painter in London and his beautiful wife and mysterious sister, at a time when women were not accepted as serious artists.

Marina Fiorato, Kit (2015), about an Irish woman who disguises herself as a man to follow her husband, who has been impressed as a soldier in the Duke of Marlborough’s regiment in 1702.


Kathy Fischer-Brown, Lord Esterleigh's Daughter (2012), about a young English woman who idolizes her father, who supposedly died in America during the French and Indian Wars; #1 in the Serpent's Tooth trilogy.

Kathy Fischer-Brown, Courting the Devil (2012), about a young English woman who becomes an indentured servant in the American colonies; #2 in the Serpent's Tooth trilogy.

Kathy Fischer-Brown, The Partisan's Wife (2013), about a young woman whose husband becomes a spy during the American Revolution; #3 in the Serpent's Tooth trilogy.


Thomas Flanagan, The Year of the French, about an Irish attempt to free itself from English rule with the assistance of French troops in 1798; #1 in the Irish trilogy.

Thomas Flanagan, The Tenants of Time, about the 1867 Fenian uprising; #2 in the Irish trilogy.

Thomas Flanagan, The End of the Hunt, about the creation of the Irish Free State and the civil war that followed; #3 in the Irish trilogy.

James Fleming, The Temple of Optimism (2000), about a man in Derbyshire in 1788 who covets his neighbor's land, while his neighbor covets his wife.

Anna Freeman, The Fair Fight (2014), about two women who work as bare-knuckles prizefighters in eighteenth-century Bristol. Review


Diana Gabaldon, Outlander (1991; titled Cross Stitch in the U.K.), a romantic novel about a former army nurse who slips back in time from the post-World-War II period to 18th century Scotland during the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion; #1 in the Outlander series. Review

Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber (1991), about a woman who slips back in time to 18th century Scotland, repeating a trip she made twenty years before; #2 in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, Voyager (1993), about a woman who travels back in time to 18th century Scotland after discovering that the man she loved there did not die at the time she believed he had; #3 in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, Drums of Autumn (1996), about a young woman who travels back in time to find the father she never knew; #4 in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, The Fiery Cross (2001), about a Scot in 1771 who knows a war is about to begin because his time-traveling wife told him about it; #5 in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, A Breath of Snow and Ashes (2005), about a twentieth century woman and her eighteenth century husband in America on the eve of the Revolution; #6 in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, An Echo in the Bone (2009), about a time-traveling woman of the twentieth century and her eighteenth-century Scottish husband during the American Revolution; #7 in the Outlander series. Review

Diana Gabaldon, Written In My Own Heart’s Blood (2014), about a time-traveling couple in Philadelphia during the American Revolution; #8 in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, The Exile: An Outlander Graphic Novel (2010), a retelling of the original Outlander story from Jamie Fraser's point of view, in the form of a graphic novel.

Diana Gabaldon, Lord John and the Private Matter, about a major in the British army; #1 in the Lord John series about a character who also appears in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade, about a major in the British army; #2 in the Lord John series about a character who also appears in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, Lord John and the Hand of Devils, a collection of three novellas about a major in the British army; #3 in the Lord John series about a character who also appears in the Outlander series.

Diana Gabaldon, Lord John and the Scottish Prisoner (2011), about a paroled Jacobite who renounces politics and war until an old companion shows up with an urgent mission for him; #4 in the Lord John series about a character who also appears in the Outlander series.


Iain Gale, Man of Honour (2007), about a British officer fighting against the army of Louis XIV in Bavaria in 1704; #1 in the Jack Steel series.

Iain Gale, Rules of War (2008), about a British officer fighting in Spain in the early eighteenth century; #2 in the Jack Steel series.

Iain Gale, Brothers in Arms (2009), about a British officer fighting the French in Flanders in 1708; #3 in the Jack Steel series.

Ian Garbutt, Wasp (2015), about a disgraced governess who is recruited to work for a high-class escort service with dark secrets.

Sophie Gee, The Scandal of the Season, based on the real-life events that inspired the satirical poem "The Rape of the Lock."

Noel B. Gerson, The Mohawk Ladder (1951), about Queen Anne's American Company of Royal Volunteers during their service to John Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough, against Louis XIV of France during the War of the Spanish Succession in the early 1700s.

Kathleen Givens, Kilgannon, about a young London woman who marries a Scot during the time of the Jacobite uprisings.

Kathleen Givens, The Wild Rose of Kilgannon, the wife of a Scot imprisoned in the Tower tries to free him; sequel to Kilgannon.

Robert Goddard, Sea Change (2016), a literary thriller about a London mapmaker who finds himself the target of murderers after, in exchange for a discharge of his debts, he agrees to deliver a package with unknown contents to Amsterdam in 1721, the year of the "South Sea Bubble" collapse.


Genevieve Graham, Under the Same Sky (2012), historical romance about a woman from South Carolina with the second sight and the Scottish Highlander whose life she has seen in visions; #1 in a trilogy.

Genevieve Graham, Sound of the Heart (2012), historical romance about a Scottish Highlander gifted with the ability to read people's thoughts, and about the woman he loves, who is sent to America as an indentured servant; #2 in a trilogy beginning with Under the Same Sky.

Genevieve Graham, Somewhere to Dream (2013), historical romance about a woman living with the Cherokee and a man who is a recent captive; #3 in a trilogy beginning with Under the Same Sky.


Winston Graham, Ross Poldark: A Novel of Cornwall, 1783-1787 (1945), about a man who returns to his Cornish mining village to find his father dead, the family estate in ruins, and the girl he loves about to marry his cousin; #1 in the Poldark series. Review

Winston Graham, Demelza: A Novel of Cornwall, 1788-1790 (1946), about life in a Cornish mining village; #2 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, Jeremy Poldark: A Novel of Cornwall, 1790-1791 (1950), about life in a Cornish mining village; #3 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, Warleggan: A Novel of Cornwall, 1792-1793 (1953), about life in a Cornish mining village; #4 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, The Black Moon: A Novel of Cornwall, 1794-1795 (1973), about life in a Cornish mining village; #5 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, The Four Swans: A Novel of Cornwall, 1795-1797 (1976), about life in a Cornish mining village; #6 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, The Angry Tide: A Novel of Cornwall, 1789-1799 (1977), about life in a Cornish mining village; #7 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, The Stranger from the Sea: A Novel of Cornwall, 1810-1811 (1981), about life in a Cornish mining village; #8 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, The Miller's Dance: A Novel of Cornwall, 1812-1813 (1982), about life in a Cornish mining village; #9 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, The Loving Cup: A Novel of Cornwall, 1813-1815 (1984), about life in a Cornish mining village; #10 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, The Twisted Sword: A Novel of Cornwall, 1815 (1990), about life in a Cornish mining village; #11 in the Poldark series.

Winston Graham, Bella Poldark: A Novel of Cornwall, 1818-1820 (2002), about life in a Cornish mining village; #12 in the Poldark series.


Katharine Grant, Sedition (2014), about four newly wealthy fathers and their five marriageable daughters in gossipy 1794 London.


Philippa Gregory, A Respectable Trade, about a woman who becomes attracted to her husband's slave in eighteenth century Bristol.

Philippa Gregory, Wideacre, about a scheming bride in Georgian England; #1 in the Wideacre trilogy.

Philippa Gregory, The Favored Child, one of two children in Georgian England is the rightful heir to an estate; #2 in the Wideacre trilogy.

Philippa Gregory, Meridon, about a poor woman in Georgian England who dreams of regaining her lost estate; #3 in the Wideacre trilogy.


Nicholas Griffin, The Requiem Shark (1999), an adventure novel about a young Welsh fiddler forced to join the pirate crew of the infamous Bartholomew Roberts ("Black Bart").

Nicholas Griffin, The House of Sight and Shadow (2000), about a pair of London doctors exploring the fringes of eighteenth century medicine as anatomists, and the rivalry that develops between them over a woman.

Nicholas Griffin, The Masquerade (2002), about a young English gentleman and his valet with numerous grounds for suspicion about each other, who travel to Italy together in 1713.

Diane Haeger, The Secret Wife of King George IV (2000), about George IV and Maria Fitzherbert.

Michael Hardwick, Regency Royal (1978), a biographical novel about England's George IV.

G.A. Henty, Bonnie Prince Charlie (1888), about the Stuart heir who was the focus of the 1745 Jacobite uprising.

G.A. Henty, A Jacobite Exile (1894), about an exiled Englishman in Sweden.


Georgette Heyer, The Black Moth (1921), the author's first novel; a Georgian romance about a disgraced earl who falls in love with a respectable young woman after rescuing her from a ruthless aristocrat. Review

Georgette Heyer, These Old Shades (1926), a Georgian romance about a dissipated aristocrat who rescues a ragged urchin and makes him his page boy, only to discover the boy is a young woman; a reworking of The Black Moth using the same characters in a different story.

Georgette Heyer, Devil's Cub (1932), a Georgian romance about a proper young woman who gets in over her head when she tries to prevent her foolish sister from being ruined by a rakish aristocrat; a sequel to These Old Shades that can be read as a stand-alone. Review

Georgette Heyer, Powder and Patch (1930; a reissue of her 1923 novel The Transformation of Philip Jetten minus the last chapter), a Georgian romance about a country gentleman who goes to Paris in a misguided attempt to acquire more polish after a London dandy pays court to the girl he loves.

Georgette Heyer, The Convenient Marriage (1934), a Georgian romance about a plain young woman who, to save her sister from a loveless marriage, offers to sacrifice herself by becoming the bride instead.

Georgette Heyer, The Talisman Ring (1936), a Georgian romance about a couple disinclined to wed each other, although it is the dying wish of her grandfather, who sees no other way of providing for her well-being.

Georgette Heyer, Masqueraders (1928), a Georgian romance about a sister and brother who each masquerade as the opposite sex while on their way to London during the Jacobite uprising.


Liz Curtis Higgs, Here Burns My Candle (2010), about a Scottish widow and her two daughters-in-law during the Jacobite Rebellion; Christian message.

Liz Curtis Higgs, Thorn in My Heart (2003), a retelling of the Biblical story of Jacob, Leah and Rachel, set in eighteenth-century Scotland; Christian message; #1 in the Lowlands of Scotland series. Review

Liz Curtis Higgs, Fair is the Rose (2004), a retelling of the Biblical story of Jacob, Leah and Rebecca, set in eighteenth-century Scotland; Christian message; #2 in the Lowlands of Scotland series.

Liz Curtis Higgs, Whence Came a Prince (2005), a retelling of the Biblical story of Jacob, Leah and Rebecca, set in eighteenth-century Scotland; Christian message; #3 in the Lowlands of Scotland series.

Liz Curtis Higgs, Grace in Thine Eyes (2006), a retelling of the Biblical story of Dinah, set in eighteenth-century Scotland; Christian message; #4 in the Lowlands of Scotland series.

Liz Curtis Higgs, Mine Is the Night (2011), about a young widow and her mother-in-law who arrive in the Scottish town of Selkirk where they must rebuild their lives; #5 and last in the Lowlands of Scotland series.


Greg Hollingshead, Bedlam: A Novel of Love and Madness, about a man unjustly imprisoned in an 18th century London madhouse.

Rachel Hore, A Place of Secrets (2012), about a woman of the present who becomes fascinated by the 300-year-old journal of an astronomer and its secrets, which may link to mysterious events in the present day.


Elizabeth Hoyt, The Raven Prince (2006), steamy historical romance about a widow who takes a job as secretary for a badly behaved earl; #1 in the Prince series.

Elizabeth Hoyt, The Leopard Prince (2007), steamy historical romance about a noblewoman who falls in love with her steward in the midst of an epidemic of sheep poisonings; #2 in the Prince series.

Elizabeth Hoyt, The Serpent Prince (2007), steamy historical romance about a country woman who falls in love with a viscount on a mission of revenge; #3 in the Prince series.


C.C. Humphreys, Jack Absolute (2004), about a charming rogue forced to serve as a spy for the British during the American Revolution; #1 in the Jack Absolute series.

C.C. Humphreys, The Blooding of Jack Absolute (2005), a coming-of-age story about the son of an unemployed actress and a soldier who leave him in the care of abusive relatives, upon whose death he embarks on a series of hair-raising adventures; #2 in the Jack Absolute series and a prequel to Jack Absolute.

C.C. Humphreys, Absolute Honour (2006), about a charming rogue who becomes enamored with an attractive woman involved in a seditious plot; #3 in the Jack Absolute series.


Seth Hunter, The Time of Terror (2008), a British naval officer is given the assignment of wrecking the French economy by smuggling French banknotes into Paris in 1793 amid the bloody aftermath of the Revolution; #1 in the Captain Nathan Peake series

Seth Hunter, The Tide of War (2009), a British naval officer newly promoted to captain discovers the previous captain of his ship in the Caribbean was murdered, and must also cope with a dangerous French ship, a seductive woman, and an American agent; #2 in the Captain Nathan Peake series

Seth Hunter, The Price of Glory (2010), about a British naval commander sent on a secret mission to Paris during the French Revolution, where he has a fateful encounter with Napoleon Bonaparte; #3 in the Captain Nathan Peake series.


Michael Irwin, The Skull and the Nightingale (2013), about a young man who returns to London, where his godfather coerces him into joining the debaucheries of the city's aristocratic underground.

Naomi Jacob, The Irish Boy (1955), a biographical novel about the eighteenth century Irish tenor Michael Kelly, whose singing career took him to Italy and Austria.

Miranda Jarrett, Seduction of an English Beauty, historical romance about an eighteenth century Englishwoman in Rome.

Susanna Kearsley, The Firebird (2013), historical romance about a present-day woman capable of sensing an object's history by holding it in her hand, and an eighteenth-century Russian woman connected with Catherine the Great.

Susanna Kearsley, A Desperate Fortune (2015), a time-slip story about a present-day woman with Asperger's and a skill with codes, and the Jacobite exile whose 300-year-old diary she is hired to decipher.


Mark Keating, The Pirate Devlin (2010), about the former servant of a British naval officer, who becomes a ruthless pirate; #1 in the Pirate Devlin series.

Mark Keating, Hunt for White Gold (2011), about a former servant to a naval officer, now a feared pirate, searching for a secret more valuable than gold: the formula for Chinese porcelain; #2 in the Pirate Devlin series.

Mark Keating, Blood Diamond (2013), about a former servant to a naval officer, now a feared pirate, who is asked to assist the fraudulent South Sea Company by stealing a renowned diamond from its owner, a French prince; #3 in the Pirate Devlin series.

Mark Keating, Cross of Fire (2013), about a former servant to a naval officer, now a feared pirate, who is hunting one enemy while being hunted by others in the seas off Africa; #4 in the Pirate Devlin series.


M. Kei, The Sallee Rovers (2010), about a British sailor struggling to come out as gay while surviving storms, battles and other challenges at sea; #1 in the Pirates of the Narrow Seas series; self-published.

M. Kei, Men of Honor (2010), about a British sailor arrested on charges of sodomy and desertion; #2 in the Pirates of the Narrow Seas series; self-published.

M. Kei, Iron Men (2010), about a gay British sailor trying to rescue his captain from drink as mutiny threatens; #3 in the Pirates of the Narrow Seas series; self-published.


S. K. Keogh, The Prodigal (2012), about an Englishman who sails to the West Indies to avenge the death of his father by pirates and find his kidnapped mother; #1 in the planned Jack Mallory Chronicles series.

Karleen Koen, Through a Glass Darkly, a young woman marries a much older man during the time of the South Sea Bubble speculation.

Karleen Koen, Now Face to Face, a politically astute young widow travels from England to Virginia; sequel to Through a Glass Darkly.

Rosalind Laker, The Sugar Pavilion, a woman refugee from the French Revolution opens a confection shop in Brighton.

Rosalind Laker, The Silver Touch, based on the true story of a woman silversmith in eighteenth century England.

Dinah Lampitt, As Shadows Haunting, time travel by a twentieth-century woman into Georgian England

Emery Lee, The Highest Stakes (2010), about an orphaned girl, the stableboy who loves her, and horse racing in England and Colonial Virginia.

J. Ardian Lee, Son of the Sword, a man travels in time to Scotland during the Jacobite rebellions; #1 in the Matheson Saga; J. Ardian Lee is a pen name formerly used by author Julianne Lee.

J. Ardian Lee, Outlaw Sword, a man travels in time to Scotland during the Jacobite rebellions; #2 in the Matheson Saga; J. Ardian Lee is a pen name formerly used by author Julianne Lee.

J. Ardian Lee, Sword of King James, a man travels in time to Scotland during the eighteenth century Jacobite rebellions; #3 in the Matheson Saga; J. Ardian Lee is a pen name formerly used by author Julianne Lee.

J. Ardian Lee, Sword of the White Rose, a man travels in time to Scotland during the Jacobite rebellions; #4 in the Matheson Saga; J. Ardian Lee is a pen name formerly used by author Julianne Lee.


Freda Lightfoot, The Duchess of Drury Lane (2012), about Dorothy Jordan, a London actress who became the mistress of the Duke of Clarence, later King William IV, in 1791.


Norah Lofts, Out of this Nettle (1938; also titled Colin Lowrie), about a young Scottish rebel who must flee after the disastrous battle at Culloden Field.

Norah Lofts, Hester Roon (1940), about an orphaned girl who flees into London's underworld after being raped by her employer.

Norah Lofts, Afternoon of an Autocrat (1956; also titled The Deadly Gift and The Devil in Clevely), set in a village in Suffolk, England.

Norah Lofts, The Lost Ones (1969; also titled The Lost Queen), about Princess Caroline Matilda, the youngest sister of King George III of England, and her marriage to the mentally unstable Prince Christian of Denmark.


Kelly Long, Arms of Love (2012), about a young Amish man whose sympathies are with the American patriots, and the woman he loves, whose father is jailed as a conscientious objector; #1 in the planned Amish Beginnings series.

Charlotte Lovejoy, Madame Bliss (2009), an erotic novel about a beautiful servant girl "ruined" by her master, who then sets out for London determined to enjoy all the pleasures life has to offer.

Edward Marston, Soldier of Fortune (2008), about an English-Dutch soldier/spy during the seventeenth century war of the Spanish Succession; #1 in the Captain Rawson series.

Edward Marston, Drums of War (2008), about an English-Dutch soldier/spy assigned to rescue a fellow spy and his beautiful daughter who have been caught behind enemy lines in France; #2 in the Captain Rawson series.

Rebecca Mascull, Song of the Sea Maid (2015), about a woman raised in an orphanage who gains a scientific education and travels to Portugal where she finds evidence for a theory that anticipates Darwin.


F. Van Wyck Mason, Manila Galleon (1961), about George Anson's disastrous voyage around the world in 1740-1744 and his eventual capture of the Manila Galleon.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Rascals' Heaven (1964), about James Edward Oglethorpe, the British general who founded the colony of Georgia in 1733, and his plan to take people of good character from debtor's prison and settle them in Georgia.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Brimstone Club (1971), about a London men's club that was a forerunner of the infamous Hellfire Club.


Maria McCann, Ace, King, Knave (2013), about an aristocratic young woman engaged to a man who may not be what he presents himself to be, and a former prostitute who fears the man who keeps her may be stealing corpses. Review at The Guardian

Katharine McMahon, The Alchemist's Daughter (2006), about the daughter of a Newtonian philosopher who marries for love after becoming pregnant and then rediscovers the value of her father's rational investigations.

Katharine McMahon, Season of Light (2011), about a young English woman who travels to Paris before the Revolution and meets a dashing idealist at a literary salon before returning to England where she is under pressure to marry for money.

Elisabeth McNeill, The Heartbreaker (2009), about Bonnie Prince Charlie and the poor shepherdess who, after helping him escape Scotland, struggles to keep herself and her four children alive.

Andrew Miller, Ingenious Pain (1997), about a phyisican of the mid-18th century who was born with a physical condition that makes him unable to feel pain.

Steph Minns, One Man Drowning (2009), about a gay man who in 1762 runs away from his passionless marriage to a life at sea and an affair with a ship captain who runs a smuggling operation; self-published.

Caiseal Mór, Carolan's Concerto (2002), about an Irish rebel on the run from the English who stops at a campfire where two men tell him a tale of the harper Turlough O'Carolan, whose music was said to be a gift from the fairies

Jude Morgan, An Accomplished Woman (2007), a Georgian romantic comedy about a woman with no intention of marrying. Review

Andrew Motion, Silver (2012), a sequel to Robert Louis Stevenson'sTreasure Island, in which the son and daughter of two former pirates set out to find the remainder of the treasure their fathers left behind forty years previously.

Andrew Motion, The New World (2015), about a boy shipwrecked on the coast of Texas after escaping from a gang of pirates; sequel to Silver.

Peter Mottley, The Harlot's Progress: Yorkshire Molly (2009), about an innocent young Yorkshire woman snared into a life of prostitution when she travels to London; independently published by the late author's daughter.

Neil Munro, The Shoes of Fortune (1901), about a Scot who renounces his support for the Jacobite rebellion after discovering what Prince Charles is like.


Mary Nichols, The Captain's Mysterious Lady (2010), historical romance set in Georgian England before it had a police force, about a Captain hunting down the men who killed his wife, who rescues a damsel in distress along the way; #1 in the Piccadilly Gentleman's Club series.

Mary Nichols, The Viscount's Unconventional Bride (2010), historical romance set in Georgian England before it had a police force, about a man who falls in love with the runaway he has been assigned to return to her home; #2 in the Piccadilly Gentleman's Club series.

Mary Nichols, Lord Portman's Troublesome Wife (2010), historical romance set in Georgian England before it had a police force, about a man who marries a penniless young woman out of compassion but keeps her at arm's length because he is still mourning his first wife; #3 in the Piccadilly Gentleman's Club series.


Chris Nicholson, The Elephant Keeper (2009), about a stable boy who forms a bond with a pair of elephants shipped to England in 1766.

Diana Norman, Blood Royal, about an eighteenth century Englishwoman left destitute after her husband invests and loses her fortune in the South Sea Bubble

Diana Norman, The Shores of Darkness, about a man on a quest to find two women his aunt sold as slaves in the West Indies

Victoria Owens, Drawn to Perfection (2013), about a shy young woman in the Welsh Marches in the 1750s whose family's troubles could be solved if she marries well.

Janet Paisley, White Rose Rebel, about a Scottish woman who leads her clan in warfare during the Jacobite rebellion.

William Palmer, The Devil Is White (2013), about a group of idealistic English gentlemen and their 1792 project to found a community on an island off the coast of Africa where white and black can live together in harmony.

B.N. Peacock, A Tainted Dawn (2012), about a British aristocrat, a French revolutionary, and a British street fiddler who meet in London and are later embroiled in conflict in the Caribbean.

Wendy K. Perriman, Fire on Dark Water (2011), about an English gypsy who marries Edward Teach without realizing he is the violent and ruthless pirate known as Blackbeard.

Tim Powers, On Stranger Tides (1987), historical fantasy about a traveler whose ship is captured by the pirate Blackbeard, who is searching for the Fountain of Youth.

Cherie Pugh, Mary Read: Sailor, Soldier, Pirate (2008), a biographical novel about the eighteenth century woman pirate Mary Read; self-published.

Caroline Rance, Kill-Grief (2009), about a young woman who becomes a nurse in eighteenth century England and uses gin to drown the horrors of the medical world.

Paul Reid, A Cruel Harvest (2010), about a young man and woman in love who are separated when Moroccan pirates raid their Irish village.

Hallie Rubenhold, Mistress of My Fate (2011), a bawdy romp about a spirited young woman's romantic adventures; #1 in the Confessions of Henrietta Lightfoot series. Review at The Independent

Hallie Rubenhold, The French Lesson (2016), about a woman who goes to Paris to search for the man she loves, where she encounters a Scottish courtesan and is drawn into a nest of spies; #2 in the Confessions of Henrietta Lightfoot series.


Sean Thomas Russell, Under Enemy Colors (2007), about a British naval officer sent to sea on an aging frigate under a weak commander with a mutinous crew; #1 in the Charles Hayden series.

Sean Thomas Russell, A Battle Won (2010), about a British naval commander sent on a mission to supply the French city of Toulon, which has turned itself over to the British as the French Revolution rages; #2 in the Charles Hayden series.

Sean Thomas Russell, A Ship of War (2012), about a British naval officer who discovers a French plan to invade England in 1794 during the French Revolution; #3 in the Charles Hayden series.

Sean Thomas Russell, Until the Sea Shall Give Up Her Dead (2014), about a British naval commander who, while on his way to a mission in the Caribbean, rescues a pair of Spanish castaways who are not what they seem; #4 in the Charles Hayden series.


Caroline Sandon, Burnt Norton (2013), about a wealthy man who, after his youngest son dies, covets the maidservant with whom his eldest son is in love.

Sir Walter Scott, Rob Roy, about clan warfare in eighteenth century Scotland.

Sir Walter Scott, Waverley, about the 1745 Jacobite rebellion.

J.E. Seanachaí, Dead Bird in the Weeds (2009), about an Irish peasant woman who joins the 1798 rebellion against England; self-published.

Anya Seton, Devil Water, about a man and his daughter during the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745.

Frances Sherwood, Vindication, a novel based on the life of Mary Wollstonecraft.


Peter Smalley, HMS Expedient, about about British naval officers on a scientific expedition to the South Seas that is not all it seems to be; #1 in the William Rennie series.

Peter Smalley, Port Royal, about about British naval officers on a mission to Port Royal Jamaica, where the pre-Revolutionary France is hatching a sinister plot; #2 in the William Rennie series.

Peter Smalley, Barbary Coast, about British naval officers on a dangerous mission to the Barbary Coast; #3 in the William Rennie series.

Peter Smalley, The Hawk, about British naval officers on a mission to intercept a contraband runner that leads to something far more serious; #4 in the William Rennie series.

Peter Smalley, The Gathering Storm (2009), about a British seaman given the chance to rebuild his shattered naval career by going on an unusually dangerous mission in Revolutionary France; #4 in the William Rennie series.

Peter Smalley, The Pursuit (2010), about a British naval captain and his friend who are chosen for a secret mission; #5 in the William Rennie series.


Donald Smith, The English Spy, a fictional account of Daniel Defoe's activities as a spy for the English in 1707 Scotland.

Jessica Stirling, The Fields of Fortune (2007), about a young woman who flees to her sister in Edinburgh rather than go through with a disastrous marriage

Jessica Stirling, A Kiss and a Promise (2009), historical romance set in Scotland about a servant girl who sets out to win the heart of a man whose goal is to marry a girl with enough money to save his family's farm.

Philippa Stockley, A Factory of Cunning, a darkly humorous novel about an exiled French aristocrat who turns swindler in 1784 London.

Bev Stout, Secrets of the Realm (2013), about a fifteen-year-old girl in the eighteenth century who joins the crew of outcasts and gentlemen on a British merchant ship after she is blamed for her uncle's death; self-published.


Showell Styles, Mr. Fitton's Prize (1993), about the master's mate on a British ship whose loyalty is strained when the captain refuses to come to the aid of French royalists (including a beautiful woman) attacked by revolutionaries; #1 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, Mr. Fitton and the Black Legion (1993), about the master's mate on a British ship in February 1797 when the French army lands on the coast of Pembroke; #2 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, A Sword for Mr. Fitton (1975), about a British seaman who becomes acting lieutenant on a ship in the Caribbean in 1799 amid threats of mutiny by the crew; #3 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, Mr. Fitton in Command (1995), about the master's mate on a British ship who finds himself in command of the surviving crew after a disastrous encounter with a French ship; #4 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, The 12-Gun Cutter (1996), about a British seaman serving on a magnificent cutter under an enigmatic captain; #5 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, Mr. Fitton's Commission (1977), about a married former naval officer returned to duty in 1803 and sent to the West Indies; #6 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, Lieutenant Fitton (1997), about a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy in charge of capturing the enemy privateers who are disrupting British trade in the Caribbean; #7 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, Mr. Fitton at the Helm (1998), about a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy serving in the West Indies who has difficulties with an incompetent officer assigned to serve under him; #8 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, The Martinique Mission (1999), about a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy serving in the West Indies whose career appears to be at an end when his ship is captured by the French; #9 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, Mr. Fitton's Hurricane (2000), about a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy; #10 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, The Baltic Convoy (1979), about a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy sent to escort an convoy of ships bringing timber to Britain needed for the war against the French; #11 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.

Showell Styles, A Ship for Mr. Fitton (1991), about a British naval officer who accepts command of a ship on its way to Marseilles in 1815 during the war with France, promising his pregnant wife he will be home in time for the birth; #12 chronologically by setting in the Michael Fitton series.


Joanna Taylor, Masquerade (2016), historical romance about a London street girl and a lord who asks her to masquerade as his lady companion.

William Makepeace Thackeray, The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1848), about an eighteenth century Irish adventurer and con man who marries a widow in order to get his hands on her fortune.


Nigel Tranter, MacGregor's Gathering, about the Highland leader Rob Roy MacGregor and his nephew Gregor, Laird of Glengyle; #1 in the MacGregor trilogy

Nigel Tranter, The Clansman, about Rob Roy MacGregor and why he may have acted as he did at the 1715 Battle of Sheriffmuir; #2 in the MacGregor trilogy.

Nigel Tranter, Gold for Prince Charlie, about Rob Roy MacGregor's efforts to protect the gold and arms that arrived too late to help Prince Charlie's supporters win the Battle of Culloden; #3 in the MacGregor trilogy


Kate Tremayne, Adam Loveday (1999), about twin brothers in Cornwall and their rivalry for the inheritance of the family estate and the love of a woman; #1 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Fortunes (2000), about a Cornishman in 1791 and his struggle to find out who murdered his brother-in-law; #2 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Trials (2001), about two Cornish brothers, one forced to leave his bride to earn his living as a sailor, the other involved in a smuggling scheme which leads to a false accusation of murder; #3 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Scandals (2003), about a Cornish family struggling to rise above scandal as one of its members is away at sea and another banished to America; #4 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Honour (2004), about the efforts of a Cornish family to restore the family name after one of them is convicted of highway robbery and another is exposed as illegitimate; #5 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Pride (2005), about a Cornish family's struggle to salvage its pride amid the bitter rivalry of two brothers; #6 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Loyalty (2006), about a Cornish family's efforts to unite, despite a legacy of rivalry between brothers, so that they can defeat their common enemy; #7 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Revenge (2007), about a Cornish family brought to the verge of ruin by tragedy and the hatred of a smuggler and their efforts to gain revenge on their adversaries; #8 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Secrets (2008), about a Cornish family and the shocking secrets that come to light after one of them rescues a small boy from a disastrous coach crash; #9 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Conspiracy (2009), about a family in Cornwall that, through a foolish mistake, loses the manor house which has been in their family for generations; #10 in the Loveday series.

Kate Tremayne, The Loveday Vendetta (2010), about the members of a family in Cornwall who face an enemy so powerful they must give up their quarrels and unite if the family is to be preserved; #11 in the Loveday series.


F. Van Wyck Mason, Captain Nemesis (1931), about an innocent Englishman sentenced to imprisonment in an Australian penal colony who leads a rebellion aboard ship and turns pirate.

Barry Unsworth, Sacred Hunger (1992), a literary novel about the captain of a slave ship on a disastrous voyage; winner of the 1992 Man Booker Prize.

Barry Unsworth, The Quality of Mercy (2011), about an Irish fiddler who escapes from an American jail only to once again run afoul of the greedy shipper who accused him; sequel to Sacred Hunger.

Carter Vaughan, The Charlatan (1959), about a senior British spy for John Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough, against Louis XIV of France during the War of the Spanish Succession in 1702; Carter Vaughan is a pseudonym of Noel B. Gerson.

Ciji Ware, Island of the Swans (1988), historical romance based on the life of the Scottish noblewoman Jane Maxwell, Duchess of Gordon. Review

Elizabeth Wilhide, Ashenden (2012), about a present-day brother and sister who inherit an English country house and about the people who lived there from 1775 to the present day.

A.N. Wilson, The Potter's Hand (2012), about Josiah Wedgwood, founder of the Wedgwood china works, and his family. Review at The Independent

James Wilson, The Dark Clue (2001), Walter Hartright and Marian Halcombe (based on fictional characters from Wilkie Collins's Woman in White) investigate the dark side of artist William Turner's life.

James Wilson, The Bastard Boy (2005), about an Englishman who travels to America in 1774 to find the bastard child fathered by his brother.

Stanley Wilson, Leave the Gallows Hungry: First Fleet to Australia (2010), about the first ship of convicts sent to Australia, including the hardships they suffered in England before they were convicted and transported; self-published.

Paul Witcover, The Emperor of All Things (2013), historical fantasy set in an alternative eighteenth-century England where a journeyman clockmaker searches for a pocket-watch with magical powers; #1 in the Daniel Quare series.

Paul Witcover, The Watchman of Eternity (2015), historical fantasy set in an alternative eighteenth-century England where a member of a clockmakers' guild searches for a pocket-watch with magical powers; #2 in the Daniel Quare series.

Jack Wolf, The Tale of Raw Head and Bloody Bones (2013), about a promising young medical student at London's St. Thomas Hospital in 1751 who wants to learn how to prevent pain, but is also obsessed with causing it.

Richard Woodman, The Wager (1999), about a young woman whose sea captain father wagers her hand in marriage to the captain of the ship that beats him in a race from Shanghai to London.

Kate Worsley, She Rises (2013), about a dairy maid in 1740 who seizes the opportunity to become lady's maid to the daughter of a ship captain.


Mysteries and Thrillers: 18th Century Britain

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Bruce Alexander, Blind Justice (1994), about a London magistrate who investigates an apparent suicide; based on the historical Sir John Fielding, the blind magistrate who (with his brother Henry) started London's first police force; #1 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, Murder in Grub Street (1995), about a blind London magistrate who investigates the murder of a printer and his household; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #2 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, Watery Grave (1996), about a blind London magistrate who investigates the murder of a naval officer; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #3 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, Person or Persons Unknown (1997), about a blind London magistrate who investigates a series of murders of prostitutes; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #4 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, Jack, Knave and Fool (1998), about a blind London magistrate who investigates a lord's death during a concert; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #5 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, Death of a Colonial (1999), about a blind London magistrate who investigates the possible connection between a missing nobleman's reappearance and a case of suicide in the American colonies; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #6 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, The Color of Death (2000), about a blind London magistrate who investigates a gang of violent criminals; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #7 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, Smuggler's Moon (2001), about a blind London magistrate who investigates smuggling and murder; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #8 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, An Experiment in Treason (2002), about a blind London magistrate who investigates the theft of a packet of letters that end up in the American colonies, with the possible involvement of Benjamin Franklin; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #9 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, The Price of Murder (2003), about a blind London magistrate who investigates the case of a girl drowned in the Thames; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #10 in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.

Bruce Alexander, Rules of Engagement (2005), about a blind London magistrate who investigates an apparent case of suicide that may be connected to the appearance of a student of Dr. Mesmer's theories of animal magnetism; based on the historical Sir John Fielding; #11 and last in the Sir John Fielding mystery series.


Andrei Baltakmens, The Raven's Seal (2012), about a nobleman imprisoned for a murder he did not commit and the slum girl who tries to help him prove his innocence. Review or Author Interview


Robin Blake, A Dark Anatomy (2011), about a village coroner and his physician friend who investigate the murder of a squire's wife in 1740; #1 in the Cragg and Fidelis mystery series.

Robin Blake, Dark Waters (2012), about a village coroner and his physician friend who investigate the drowning of an innkeeper shortly before a hotly contested election; #2 in the Cragg and Fidelis mystery series.

Robin Blake, The Hidden Man (2015; titled The Scrivener in the UK), about a village coroner and his physician friend who in 1742 investigate the apparent suicide of a pawnbroker in a locked room, which may be connected with the slave trade; #3 in the Cragg and Fidelis mystery series.


Lillian de la Torre, Dr. Sam Johnson, Detector: Being, A Light-Hearted Collection of Recently Reveal'd Episodes in the Career of the Great Lexicographer (1946), a collection of short stories in which Samuel Johnson, the eighteenth century compiler of the first comprehensive dictionary of the English language, solves mysteries; #1 in the Dr. Sam Johnson series.

Lillian de la Torre, The Detections of Dr. Sam Johnson (1960), a collection of short stories in which Samuel Johnson, the compiler of the first comprehensive dictionary of the English language, solves mysteries; #2 in the Dr. Sam Johnson series

Lillian de la Torre, The Return of Dr. Sam Johnson, Detector (1984), a collection of short stories in which Samuel Johnson, the compiler of the first comprehensive dictionary of the English language, solves mysteries; #3 in the Dr. Sam Johnson series

Lillian de la Torre, The Exploits of Dr. Sam Johnson, Detector, a collection of short stories in which Samuel Johnson, the compiler of the first comprehensive dictionary of the English language, solves mysteries; #4 in the Dr. Sam Johnson series.


Carter Dickson, Fear Is the Same (1956), a time-travel murder mystery set in 1795; Carter Dickson was a pen-name of John Dickson Carr.


Patrick Easter, The Watermen (2011), a thriller about a river surveyor for the new London marine police and his enemy, a criminal out to get revenge for the brutal punishment he received after a court martial; #1 in the Tom Pascoe mystery series.

Patrick Easter, The River of Fire (2013), about a surveyor for London's river police who investigates the drowning of two men in a sunken lugger, which may be connected to a French plot to weaken England during the Napoleonic Wars; #2 in the Tom Pascoe mystery series.

Patrick Easter, The Rising Tide (2013), about a surveyor for London's river police who is grieving and drinking too much when he is asked to investigate the drowning death of an associate of William Pitt, while Pitt tries to force his anti-slavery bill through Parliament in 1799; #3 in the Tom Pascoe mystery series.

Patrick Easter, Cuckold Point (2015), about a London river policeman who, while investigating a robbery, learns in the city's secretive Jewish district that a shipment of silk is about to come on the market, and finds it may be connected with a dangerous conspiracy; #4 in the Tom Pascoe mystery series.


Janet Gleeson, The Grenadillo Box, about a journeyman for the famous eighteenth century furniture-maker Thomas Chippendale and his attempt to find out who is murdering people at the manor house where he has come to install a library.

Janet Gleeson, The Serpent in the Garden, about a fictional eighteenth century portrait painter and his attempt to solve the mystery surrounding two deaths and a couple whose wedding portrait he painted.

Janet Gleeson, The Thief Taker, about a cook for a family of famous eighteenth century London silversmiths, who is charged with finding out what her fellow servants know about a theft and a murder.

Robert Goddard, Sea Change, about an impoverished mapmaker during the collapse of the South Sea Bubble in 1721 who becomes a pawn in a dangerous game when he agrees to deliver a package in return for the discharge of his debts.


Tessa Harris, The Anatomist's Apprentice (2012), about an American anatomist living in London who investigates a case of poisoning in Oxfordshire; #1 in the Dr. Thomas Silkstone mystery series.

Tessa Harris, The Dead Shall Not Rest (2013), about an American anatomist living in England who examines an eight-foot-tall man appearing at a local spring fair who may not live much longer and whose corpse will be coveted by body-snatchers; #2 in the Dr. Thomas Silkstone mystery series.

Tessa Harris, The Devil's Breath (2013), about an American anatomist investigating a murder in the English countryside that villagers believe is the work of the Devil; #3 in the Dr. Thomas Silkstone mystery series.

Tessa Harris, The Lazarus Curse (2014), about an American anatomist searching for a missing botanist, the sole survivor of a scientific expedition to Jamaica, in 1780s London; #4 in the Dr. Thomas Silkstone mystery series.

Tessa Harris, Shadow of the Raven (2015), about an American anatomist trying to free the woman he loves from the Bedlam mental hospital in 1784; #5 in the Dr. Thomas Silkstone mystery series.

Tessa Harris, Secrets in the Stones (2016), about an American anatomist who must clear the woman he loves from a murder charge shortly after she is released from the Bedlam mental hospital; #6 in the Dr. Thomas Silkstone mystery series.


Miranda Hearn, A Life Everlasting (1999), about the ghost of a London surgeon who dies in 1785 and the other eminent ghosts who gather about him as he tries to discover who murdered him.

Keith Heller, Man's Illegal Life (1984), about a night watchman in London who discovers the body of a murdered man; #1 in the George Man trilogy.

Keith Heller, Man's Loving Family (1985), about a London man who takes a job as bodyguard for a merchant's son but fails to prevent his murder; #2 in the George Man trilogy.

Keith Heller, Man's Storm (1985), about a London man who investigates a woman's murder amid the Great Storm of 1703; #3 in the George Man trilogy.

Antonia Hodgson, The Devil in the Marshalsea (2014), about a London man sent to debtor's prison in 1727, where he tries to solve a series of killings before he becomes the next to die.

Ross King, Domino (2003), about a naive young artist drawn into a web of intrigue by a mysterious noblewoman.

Deryn Lake, Death in the Dark Walk, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #1 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death at the Beggar's Opera, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #2 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death at the Devil's Tavern, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #3 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death on the Romney Marsh, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #4 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death in the Peerless Pool, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #5 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death at Apothecaries' Hall, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #6 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death in the West Wind, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #7 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death at St. James's Palace, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #8 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death in the Valley of Shadows, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #9 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death in the Setting Sun, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #10 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death and the Cornish Fiddler, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #11 in the John Rawlings mystery series.

Deryn Lake, Death in Hellfire, an apothecary and a blind magistrate (Sir John Fielding) investigate murders in Georgian London; #12 in the John Rawlings mystery series.


David Liss, A Conspiracy of Paper (2000), a thriller about a retired Jewish pugilist whose work as a private detective in London leads him to investigate the death of his estranged father, a stock-jobber; #1 in the Benjamin Weaver series.

David Liss, A Spectacle of Corruption (2004), a thriller about a London detective who escapes from prison and must prove his innocence during a controversial election season; #2 in the Benjamin Weaver series.

David Liss, The Devil's Company (2009), about an ex-boxer blackmailed into stealing corporate secrets from the British East India Company; #3 in the Benjamin Weaver series.


Hannah March, The Complaint of the Dove (1999), about the tutor for a young man from a wealthy family who must clear his student of a murder charge in 1760 after a beautiful actress is found strangled.

Wilder Perkins, Hoare and the Portsmouth Atrocities (1998), about a lieutenant in the British Navy, assigned to shore duty because a throat injury has left him unable to speak above a whisper, who must investigate the disappearance of a ship; #1 in the Hoare Bartholomew series.

Wilder Perkins, Hoare and the Headless Captains (2000), about a lieutenant in the British Navy, assigned to shore duty because a throat injury has left him unable to speak above a whisper, who must find out who murdered two captains; #2 in the Hoare Bartholomew series.

Wilder Perkins, Hoare and the Matter of Treason (2001), about a lieutenant in the British Navy, assigned to shore duty because a throat injury has left him unable to speak above a whisper, who must locate a missing man who may know something about a treasonous conspiracy; #3 in the Hoare Bartholomew series.

Elizabeth Redfern, The Music of the Spheres, a gritty murder mystery set in late eighteenth century London.


Imogen Robertson, Instruments of Darkness (2009), about a society woman and a reclusive anatomist who are thrown together in 1780 when she discovers a corpse; #1 in the Crowther and Westerman mystery series.

Imogen Robertson, Anatomy of Murder (2010), about a pioneering anatomist and a society woman who go to London when her sea-captain husband is injured, where they are asked to investigate a death that may be linked to an international spy ring; #2 in the Crowther and Westerman mystery series.

Imogen Robertson, Island of Bones (2011), about a pioneering anatomist and a society woman who investigate the discovery of a fresh corpse in a three-hundred-year-old island tomb in Cumbria; #3 in the Crowther and Westerman mystery series.

Imogen Robertson, Circle of Shadows (2012), about a pioneering anatomist and a society woman who travel to a German principality to help clear her brother-in-law of a murder charge; #4 in the Crowther and Westerman mystery series.


Roz Southey, Broken Harmony (2007), about an impoverished Newcastle musician who worries that the woman he loves may be the next victim in a crime spree; #1 in the Crème de la Crime series.

Roz Southey, Chords and Discords (2008), about an impoverished Newcastle musician hired to do some sleuthing for an organ builder who believes his life is in danger; #1 in the Crème de la Crime series.

Roz Southey, Secret Lament (2009), about an impoverished Newcastle musician whose apprentice is murdered; #1 in the Crème de la Crime series.

Andrew Taylor, The Anatomy of Ghosts (2010), about the author of a skeptical book about ghosts who is hired to disprove the existence of a ghost haunting a Cambridge college.

Sophia Tobin, The Silversmith's Wife (2014), a thriller about the wife of a London silversmith murdered in 1792 and the guilty secrets she is hiding.

Christopher Wakling, The Devil’s Mask (2011), about a legal clerk whose investigation of customs fees in the port of Bristol leads him into a case of grisly serial murders.

Nancy Means Wright, Midnight Fires (2010), a mystery which imagines that writer and women's rights advocate Mary Wollstonecraft investigated a case of murder during her younger years when she served as governess for the aristocratic Kingsborough family in Ireland; #1 in the Mary Wollstonecraft mystery series.

Nancy Means Wright, The Nightmare (2011), a mystery which imagines that after publishing her masterwork "A Vindication of the Rights of Women," Mary Wollstonecraft investigated a case of murder connected to a stolen painting; #2 in the Mary Wollstonecraft mystery series.


Patricia Wynn, The Birth of Blue Satan (2001), about a nobleman falsely accused of murder who escapes to become a highwayman as he tries to find the real killer with the help of a waiting woman; #1 in the Blue Satan mystery series.

Patricia Wynn, The Spider's Touch (2002), about an outlaw who accepts a secret mission from James Stuart, Pretender to the British throne, and helps a waiting woman uncover a murderous spy; #2 in the Blue Satan mystery series.

Patricia Wynn, The Motive from the Deed (2007), about an outlaw and a waiting woman who search for the real killer after her brother is accused of murdering his publisher; #3 in the Blue Satan mystery series.

Patricia Wynn, A Killing Frost (2011), about a highwayman and a waiting woman who uncover treachery after a body is found at the Frost Fair on the Thames; #4 in the Blue Satan mystery series.




Continental Europe in the 18th Century

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Hervey Allen, Anthony Adverse (1933), about an orphaned boy adopted by a wealthy man in the late eighteenth century and his adventures during the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon.

Susanne Alleyn, A Far Better Rest (2000), a reimagining of Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities from the perspective of Sydney Carton.

Susanne Alleyn, The Executioner's Heir (2013), about the early life of Charles Sanson, Paris's chief executioner in the years leading up to the French Revolution; self-published. Review

Evelyn Anthony, Imperial Highness (originally published in 1953 as Rebel Princess), about Catherine the Great's rise to become Empress of Russia; #1 in the Romanov trilogy.

Evelyn Anthony, Curse Not the King (1954), about the conflicts between Catherine the Great and the son she hated for his resemblance to his father; #2 in the Romanov trilogy.

Evelyn Anthony, Far Flies the Eagle (1955), about the conflicts between Catherine the Great's grandson Czar Alexander I and Napoleon; #3 in the Romanov trilogy.

Daniel Arsand, Lovers (2012), about a scandalous love affair between two young men in the court of Louis XV.

Stéphane Audeguy, The Only Son (2008), about Jean-Jacques Rousseau's elder brother, a libertine who worked in a brothel where he embarked on a study of the many varieties of desire.

Honoré de Balzac, The Chouans (1829 in the original French as Les Chouans), about the 1799 royalist rebellion in Brittany and a woman's tragic love for a leader of the rebellion.

Lauren Belfer, And After the Fire (2016), about a musician who receives an anti-Jewish cantata by Bach as a gift in 1783, an American soldier who finds it in 1945, and his niece in the present day who discovers it after his death.

Anne Bruck, The Painted Duchess (1995), about the beautiful Duchess of Alba who charmed the Spanish court of Charles IV and posed nude to be painted by Francisco Goya; may be hard to obtain outside the U.K.

John Boyne, The Thief of Time (2008), about a Parisian who, after witnessing his mother's murder and his stepfather's execution for the crime in 1758, flees to Dover, discovers he has stopped aging, and lives into the twentieth century.

Sally Christie, The Sisters of Versailles (2015), about the five Nesle sisters, four of whom became mistresses to King Louis XV; #1 in the Mistresses of Versailles trilogy.

Sally Christie, The Rivals of Versailles (2016), about King Louis XV's mistress the Marquise de Pompadour; #2 in the Mistresses of Versailles trilogy.

Andrei Codrescu, Casanova in Bohemia, about the aging Casanova.

Laurel Corona, The Four Seasons (2008), about two sisters left at a Venetian foundling hospital, where they become part of an all-female orchestra and are taught by Antonio Vivaldi.

Laurel Corona, Finding Emilie (2011), about a French girl curious about the scandalous past of her aristocratic mother, an intellectual who died shortly after giving birth to her, and determined to explore her own potential along with the friend who is as close to her as a sister.

Christina Courtenay, Trade Winds (2010), historical romance about a determined young Swedish woman who in 1732 makes a marriage of convenience with a handsome Scot in order to recover the inheritance her stepfather has swindled from her.

Stephanie Cowell, Marrying Mozart, about Mozart's wife.

Will Davenport, The Painter (2003), about a modern woman who discovers a diary written 300 years ago that describes the rivalry of the painter Rembrandt van Rijn and the poet Andrew Marvell for a woman's love.

Kathryn Davis, Versailles, about Marie Antoinette.

Debra Dean, The Mirrored World (2012), about the Russian Orthodox saint Xenia of St. Petersburg, who abandons her family after a tragedy in order to serve the poor.

Helma de Bois, The Incorruptible: A Tale of Revolution and Royalty (1965), about the French Revolution.

Michelle de Kretser, The Rose Grower, an American balloonist lands in France and is caught up in the French Revolution.

Catherine Delors, Mistress of the Revolution, about a young woman from an aristocratic family and her struggle to survive a brutal marriage and the upheavals of the French Revolution; told in the form of a memoir she writes years later after escaping to England. Review

Stephanie de Montalk, The Fountain of Tears (2006), a literary novel about the abduction of the Polish Countess Maria Potocka by a Tatar khan; based on an epic poem by Pushkin.

Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities (1859), about a beautiful young woman, her long-imprisoned father and a kind-hearted nobleman caught up in the French Revolution. Review

John Dickinson, The Lightstep (2008), about a man who turns against his former revolutionary ideas after the French Revolution and goes to work as spymaster for a German bishop.

Rikki Ducornet, The Fan-Maker's Inquisition: A Novel of the Marquis de Sade, an eighteenth century woman is put on trial for co-authoring books with the Marquis de Sade.

Daphne du Maurier, The Glassblowers, set during the time of the French Revolution.

Karen Engelmann, The Stockholm Octavo (2012), about a Swedish customs bureaucrat who in 1791 during the reign of Gustav III hears from a fortune-teller that he is destined to find love, a fortune that leads him into political intrigue.

Per Olov Enquist, The Royal Physician’s Visit, set in the Danish court of the mad King Christian during the 1760s.

Carolly Erickson, The Hidden Diary of Marie Antoinette (2005), about Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. Review at Fictional Appearances

Ildefonso Falcones, The Barefoot Queen (2014), about two women friends in 1748 Seville, a freed Cuban slave and a gypsy who struggle against the Spanish king's decree outlawing gypsies.

Lion Feuchtwanger, Jew Süss (1925; also titled Power), based on the life of an 18th century Jewish banker, Joseph Süss Oppenheimer, who served as a financial adviser to the Duke of Württemberg and was persecuted after the Duke's death.

Lion Feuchtwanger, This Is the Hour (1951; also titled Goya), about the Spanish Francisco Goya, and his transition from court painter for Charles IV to a painter with a political conscience who used his art to protest Spain's repressive policies.

Lion Feuchtwanger, 'Tis Folly to Be Wise: Or, Death and Transfiguration of Jean Jacques Rousseau (1952), about a young French aristocrat whose father hosts the French philosopher Rousseau in 1778 at the end of his life.

Marina Fiorato, The Daughter of Siena (2011), a thriller about a young woman whose father forces her to marry a sadistic husband as part of a shadowy plot during the horse-racing season in Siena, Italy. Review

Penelope Fitzgerald, The Blue Flower (1995), based on the life of an eighteenth century German romantic poet.

Eloise Genest, The Passions of Princes (2001), about a variety of characters, including the French king's mistress, the Marquise de Pompadour, in France and in the French territory of Louisiana beginning in 1833; self-published.

Francine du Plessix Gray, The Queen’s Lover (2012), about a Swedish nobleman who falls in love with Marie Antoinette.

Juliet Grey, Becoming Marie Antoinette (2011), about the early years of Marie Antoinette, the young Austrian archduchess whose ambitious mother trains her to become queen of France; #1 in the Marie Antoinette trilogy.

Juliet Grey, Days of Splendor, Days of Sorrow (2012), about Marie Antoinette as a young queen during the years leading up to the French Revolution; #2 in the Marie Antoinette trilogy.

Jonathan Grimwood, The Last Banquet (2013), about a man with an unusually keen sense of taste during the time of the French Revolution.

Michele Halberstadt, The Pianist in the Dark (2011), about a blind pianist, the daughter of the Empress of Austria's secretary, who discovers love after Franz-Anton Mesmer tries to restore her sight with his experimental new technique.

Lydia Harman, The Rose and the Vine (2009), about a family's efforts to survive the French Revolution; self-published. Brief Critique

Richard Harvell, The Bells (2010), about a Swiss boy with a remarkable voice who joins a choir in Vienna, where he is forced to become a castrato and falls in love with a beautiful, crippled girl.

Helen Hollick, Sea Witch, about an eighteenth century pirate; #1 in the Jesamiah Acorne trilogy.

Helen Hollick, The Pirate Code, about an eighteenth century pirate; #2 in the Jesamiah Acorne trilogy.

Helen Hollick, Bring It Close (2009), about a reformed pirate who has made an enemy of Blackbeard and is engaged to marry a white witch; #3 in the Jesamiah Acorne trilogy.

Victoria Holt, The Queen's Confession (1968), about Marie Antoinette.


Christian Jacq, The Great Magician (2008), a thriller about a keeper of ancient Egyptian knowledge who travels to Europe to find and protect a genius destined to save humanity, where he encounters the child musical prodigy Mozart; #1 in the Mozart series.

Christian Jacq, The Son of Enlightenment (2010), a thriller about Mozart as a young man and his fictional mentor, a man striving to keep alive the ancient knowledge of Egypt; #2 in the Mozart series.

Christian Jacq, The Brother of Fire (2011), a thriller about a man striving to keep alive the ancient knowledge of Egypt who must protect his protegé, Mozart, from powerful princes and jealous musicians; #3 in the Mozart series.

Christian Jacq, The Beloved of Isis (2011), a thriller about Mozart as he composes "The Magic Flute" in 1789 Vienna and tries to stay alive with the help of a man striving to preserve the ancient knowledge of Egypt; #4 in the Mozart series.


Kane, Aleron (2011), historical fantasy/horror about a man from eastern Europe who becomes a vampire; self-published.

Alex Karmel, My Revolution (1970), a novel in the form of a diary by the author Restif de la Bretonne written during the French Revolution.

Sarah Bruce Kelly, The Red Priest's Annina (2009), about a fifteen-year-old girl who struggles to become an opera singer against her father's wishes in eighteenth-century Venice; self-published.

Michael Kleeberg, The King of Corsica (2008), about the German adventurer Theodor von Neuhoff, who was proclaimed King of Corsica in 1736 but died in poverty in London.

Dorothee E. Kocks, The Glass Harmonica (2011), about a Corsican woman who in Paris learns to play the glass harmonica, a scandalously beautiful muscial instrument invented by Benjamin Franklin. Review or Author Interview

Allen Kurzweil, A Case of Curiosities, about an inventor in France before the Revolution.

Jennifer Laam, The Tsarina’s Legacy (2016), about Grigory Potemkin, who in the 1770s hopes to win back the love of Catherine the Great; and about a present-day woman who discovers she is a descendant of Catherine the Great and is invited to Russia to accept a ceremonial position as tsarina; sequel to The Secret Daughter of the Tsar.

Rosalind Laker, The Venetian Mask, about two women who secretly maintain their friendship after marrying into feuding families in eighteenth century Venice.

Rosalind Laker, Tree of Gold, about the eighteenth century silk industry in Lyons.

Lee Langley, A Conversation on the Quai Voltaire (2006), about the aristocratic French writer and artist Vivant Denon, who was saved from the guillotine by the painter David, became a favorite of Napoleon, and became the first curator of the Louvre.

Tanith Lee, The Gods are Thirsty: A Novel of the French Revolution, about the first year of the French Revolution.

Helene Lehr, The Star of the North (1990), about Catherine the Great, Empress of Russia.

Diane Scott Lewis, The False Light (2010), about a young French countess stranded in Cornwall as the French Revolution begins, after her father involves her unknowingly in embezzling money from the revolutionaries.

Diane Scott Lewis, Without Refuge (2012), about a ruined French countess searching for her missing lover in New Orleans, where she struggles to raise her children; sequel to The False Light.

Norah Lofts, Nethergate (1973), about a woman from an aristocratic family who flees to England after the French Revolution.

Michelle Lovric, Carnevale (2001), about a Venetian merchant's daughter who is seduced by Casanova and then, years later when she is a successful portrait painter, becomes involved with Lord Byron.

Michelle Lovric, The Remedy (2005), about a love affair between a woman acting as a spy for Venice in London and Valentine Greatrakes, who claimed he could cure illness through the laying on of hands.

Jeanne MacKin, The Frenchwoman (1989), about a prostitute's daughter who becomes a seamstress for Marie Antoinette on the eve of the French Revolution.

Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety (1993), about Georges-Jacques Danton, Maximilien Robespierre, Camille Desmoulins and the French Revolution.

Stephen Marlowe, Colossus: A Novel About Goya and a World Gone Mad (1972), a biographical novel about the eighteenth century Spanish artist Francisco Goya.

Isolde Martyn, Fleur-de-Lis, about a young widow who risks betraying her aristocratic background when she moves to Paris after the Revolution.

Sylvie Matton, Rembrandt’s Whore (2003), about the young woman who goes to Amsterdam to model for the eighteenth century Dutch artist Rembrandt and becomes his mistress for the remainder of his life.

Eileen Haavik McIntire, The Shadow of the Rock (2011), about a present-day woman searching for a relative lost in the Holocaust, and her ancestor who was captured by Barbary pirates and sold into slavery in Morocco; self-published.

Greg Michaels, The Secrets of Casanova (2013), about a pleasure-seeker in search of a treasure in 1755 Paris.

Andrew Miller, Casanova (1998), about the notorious womanizer Casanova and the moral qualms he begins to feel over his pursuit of a woman during a visit to London in 1763.

Andrew Miller, Pure (2011), about a young engineer commissioned to close the reeking Paris cemetery Les Innocents and exhume the bodies in 1785, shortly before the French Revolution.

David Mitchell, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet (2010), about a young clerk for the Dutch East Indies Company who in 1799 goes to work in Japan with the intention of amassing enough money to marry his wealthy sweetheart in Holland, until he encounters a samurai's daughter. Review at the L.A. Times

Rita Monaldi and Francesco Sorti, Secretum (2009), about a castrato who serves as a spy for Louis XIV in July 1700 as both the Pope and the heirless Charles II of Spain are in failing health and Europe teeters on the brink of war.

Hans Mahner Mons, The Sword of Satan (1952), about the executioner who dispatched Louis XVI.

Michelle Moran, Madame Tussaud (2011), a biographical novel about Marie Tussaud, whose talent for wax portraiture wins the approval of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette on the eve of the French Revolution.

Sallie Muirden, We Too Shall Be Mothers (2001), a novel of magical realism about a novice nun in late eighteenth century France who abandons her convent to travel.

Sena Jeter Naslund, Abundance: A Novel of Marie Antoinette (2006), about Marie Antoinette.

Sena Jeter Naslund, The Fountain of St. James Court; or, Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman (2013), a story-within-a-story about a present-day American novelist and her novel about the eighteenth-century French painter Élisabeth Vigée-Le Brun. Review

Katherine Neville, The Eight, a complex thriller set in eighteenth century France and modern Algeria, which revolves around an occult chess game connected to the time of Charlemagne.

Diana Norman, The Sparks Fly Upward, a young Englishwoman tries to rescue an aristocratic Frenchman from the guillotine during the French Revolution.

Countess Emmuska Orczy, The Scarlet Pimpernel, an Englishman rescues French aristocrats during the French Revolution.

Alyssa Palombo, The Violinist of Venice (2015), about a young woman who secretly takes violin lessons from Antonio Vivaldi after her father forbids her to pursue her love for music.

Golden Keyes Parsons, In the Shadow of the Sun King (2008), about a Huguenot family persecuted for their faith in eighteenth century France; #1 in the Darkness to Light series.

Golden Keyes Parsons, A Prisoner of Versailles (2008), about a young Huguenot widow who escapes to Switzerland with her family but is kidnapped by King Louis XIV; #2 in the Darkness to Light series.

Anne Perry, A Dish Taken Cold, a novella set during the French Revolution.

Marge Piercy, City of Darkness, City of Light, about three women who worked for reforms during the French Revolution.

Albert Sánchez Piñol, Victus: The Fall of Barcelona (2012 in the original Spanish; English translation 2014), about a Barcelona merchant’s son who becomes a military engineer during the War of Two Crowns and the 1714 Siege of Barcelona. Review at Kirkus

Peter Prange, The Philosopher’s Kiss (2011), about a beautiful young woman who flees to Paris after her mother is burned as a witch, and takes a job at a café frequented by freethinkers and revolutionaries, including the philosopher Denis Diderot.

Barbara Quick, Vivaldi's Virgins, about an orphaned young woman confined in a convent music school in eighteenth century Venice.

Piers Paul Read, Scarpia (2016), about an officer in the papal army and his love affairs with a Roman countess and a Venetian singer; based on Puccini's opera Tosca.

Francisco Rebolledo, Rasero (1995), about a hapless Spanish nobleman who encounters many of the important thinkers of the Enlightenment and experiences the turmoil of the French Revolution.

Pam Rosenthal, The Bookseller’s Daughter (2004), about a love affair on the eve of the French Revolution between a scullery maid who once worked in her late father's bookshop and an aristocratic smuggler of forbidden books who used to be her father's customer.

Anthony J. Rudel, Imagining Don Giovanni (2001), about a meeting between Mozart, Casanova and the poet Lorenzo da Ponte and Mozart's opera Don Giovanni.

Eva Augustin Rumpf, In Liberty’s Name (2015), about a young man studying for the priesthood who flees Revolutionary France for the Caribbean where another revolt is about to break out.

Rafael Sabatini, Scaramouche, an adventure novel set during the French Revolution.

Rafael Sabatini, Scaramouche the Kingmaker (1931), a sequel to Scaramouche.

Jose Saramago, Baltasar and Blimunda (1987), about a pair of unlikely lovers in eighteenth century Portugal during the building of the magnificent Convent of Mafra; the author won the 1998 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Tiziano Scarpa, Stabat Mater (2011), about a woman violinist in the all-female Instituto della Pietà of Venice, whose world changes when Vivaldi is hired as the institute's new violin teacher.

Agnes Selby, Constanze, Mozart's Beloved, about Mozart's wife.

Vivien Shotwell, Vienna Nocturne (2014), a novel which imagines that young English soprano Anna Storace had a secret affair with opera star Francesco Benucci while she was working in Italy, and later fell in love with Mozart.

J.M. Sidorova, Tbe Age of Ice (2013), about a Russian man born in 1740 who has a unique relationship with ice. Review

Eva Stachniak, The Winter Palace (2012), about a woman who serves as a spy in the Russian court during the years before the future Catherine the Great rose to power. Review or Author Interview

Eva Stachniak, Empress of the Night (2014), about Catherine the Great of Russia.

John Suchet, Passion and Anger (1997), about the composer Ludwig van Beethoven; #1 in The Last Master trilogy.

John Suchet, Passion and Pain (1998), about the composer Ludwig van Beethoven; #2 in The Last Master trilogy.

John Suchet, Passion and Glory (1999), about the composer Ludwig van Beethoven; #3 in The Last Master trilogy.

Patrick Suskind, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, a gritty literary novel about the sense of smell, set in eighteenth century Paris; dark magical realism.

Debbie Taylor, The Fourth Queen, about an eighteenth century Scottish woman kidnapped for a Moroccan harem.

Chantal Thomas, Farewell, My Queen (2003), the story of Marie Antoinette, narrated by one of her attendants. Review at The Guardian

Chantal Thomas, The Exchange of Princesses (2015), about the Spanish princess Mariana Victoria and Louise Élisabeth, daughter of the French Regent, who were married at the ages of three and eleven to the heirs to the French and Spanish thrones, Louis XV, age eleven, and Don Luis of Spain, age thirteen.

James Tipton, Annette Vallon: A Novel of the French Revolution, about the French lover of the eighteenth century English poet Wordsworth.

Alexei Tolstoy, Peter the First (originally published in 2 volumes, 1929 and 1934); a biographical novel about Peter the Great (by a member of a different branch of the Tolstoy family than the author of War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy).

Christine Trent, The Queen's Dollmaker (2010), about a London dollmaker accused of using her trade to smuggle money and jewels to Marie Antoinette.

Jean Vautrin, The Voice of the People (2002), set in Paris following the French Revolution.

Elena Maria Vidal, Trianon: A Novel of Royal France , about Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI and the Catholic faith that sustained them; Christian message; self-published.

Juliet Waldron, Mozart's Wife (2001), about Konstanze, the wife of the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

David Weiss, Sacred and Profane (1968), a biographical novel about the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

David Weiss, The Assassination of Mozart (1970), a novel about Mozart based on the theory that he was poisoned by Salieri, a rival composer; sequel to Sacred and Profane.


Dennis Wheatley, The Launching of Roger Brook (1947), about a British adventurer with an eye for women who becomes embroiled in French foreign policy during the time of Marie Antoinette; #1 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, The Shadow of Tyburn Tree (1948), about a British spy sent to Russia in 1788, who finds himself in a risky situation when Catherine the Great chooses him to be her lover; #2 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, The Rising Storm (1949), about a British spy sent to France on the eve of the Revolution, at risk not only from his mission but also from his desire for a married woman; #3 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, The Rising Storm (1951), about a British spy's attempt to rescue Marie Antoinette from the guillotine during the bloodiest phase of the French Revolution; #4 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, The Dark Secret of Josephine (1955), about a British spy who arrives in the West Indies in the midst of a slave revolt and uncovers a mysterious episode in the life of Napoleon's Empress; #5 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, The Rape of Venice (1959), about an eighteenth century British spy's attempt to rescue a beautiful woman abducted by an unscrupulous Venetian senator; #6 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, The Sultan's Daughter (1963), about a British spy and the passionate daughter of a sultan during Napoleon's Egyptian campaign; #7 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, The Wanton Princess (1966), about an eighteenth century British spy whose mission involves consoling Napoleon's newly widowed sister; #8 in the Roger Brook series.

Dennis Wheatley, Evil in a Mask (1969), about a British spy at the center of intrigues in eighteenth century Turkey, Persia, Portugal and Brazil; #9 in the Roger Brook series.


Max White, In the Blazing Light (1946), about the twenty-year love affair between the artist Francisco Goya and the scandalous Maria Teresa, Duchess of Alba.

Frank Yerby, The Devil's Laughter (1953), about a French country lawyer and his rise during the Revolution.


Mysteries and Thrillers: 18th Century European Continent

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Susanne Alleyn, Game of Patience (2006), about an unofficial police investigator in post-Revolutionary Paris trying to find out who killed a blackmailer and his former lover; #1 in the Aristide Ravel mystery series.

Susanne Alleyn, A Treasury of Regrets (2007), about an unofficial police investigator in post-Revolutionary Paris called upon to prove the innocence of a servant girl accused of poisoning her employer's father-in-law; #2 in the Aristide Ravel mystery series.

Susanne Alleyn, The Cavalier of the Apocalypse (2009), about a penniless writer who becomes the chief suspect in a murder investigation after he discovers a corpse in a graveyard; #3 in the Aristide Ravel mystery series (a prequel to Game of Patience and A Treasury of Regrets). Review or Author Interview

Susanne Alleyn, Palace of Justice (2010), about a freelance assistant to the Paris police who investigates the appearance of headless, but not guillotined, corpses in Revolutionary Paris; #4 in the Aristide Ravel mystery series. Review or Author Interview


P. J. Brackston, Gretel and the Case of the Missing Frog Prints (2015), historical fantasy mystery about a woman in eighteenth-century Bavaria (the grown-up Gretel of "Hansel and Gretel") who takes on the job of searching for a set of missing artworks by Albrecht Durer the Much Much Younger; #1 in the Brothers Grimm mystery series.

P. J. Brackston, Once Upon a Crime (2016), historical fantasy mystery about a woman in eighteenth-century Bavaria (the grown-up Gretel of "Hansel and Gretel") whose efforts to trace some missing cats appears to be connected to a murder; #2 in the Brothers Grimm mystery series; a prequel to #1.

P. J. Brackston, The Case of the Fickle Mermaid (2016), historical fantasy mystery about a woman in eighteenth-century Bavaria (the grown-up Gretel of "Hansel and Gretel") who accepts employment as a detective on a cruise ship to find out why sailors are mysteriously disappearing; #3 in the Brothers Grimm mystery series.


P.C. Doherty, The Masked Man, an investigation into the identity of the "man in the iron mask" set in eighteenth century Paris.

Laura Lebow, The Figaro Murders (2015), a mystery in which Mozart's librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte is accused of murdering a nobleman's protege and must clear himself while meeting the impending deadline for the Marriage of Figaro libretto.

Laura Lebow, Sent to the Devil (2016), a mystery in which Mozart's librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte tries to find out who murdered a priest who was an old friend of his, while putting a final polish on his libretto for Don Giovanni; #2 in the Lorenzo Da Ponte mystery series.


Beverle Graves Myers, Interrupted Aria, about a young castrato singer in eighteenth century Venice whose friend is accused of murdering a prima donna; #1 in the Baroque Mystery series.

Beverle Graves Myers, Painted Veil, about a young castrato singer in eighteenth century Venice on the trail of a villain who wears the bird mask of a plague doctor; #2 in the Baroque Mystery series.

Beverle Graves Myers, Cruel Music, about a young castrato singer in eighteenth century Rome whose brother is arrested on a trumped-up smuggling charge during the controversy over who should succeed the dying Pope Clement XII; #3 in the Baroque Mystery series.

Beverle Graves Myers, The Iron Tongue of Midnight, about a young castrato singer in eighteenth century Venice who is paid lavishly to accept the lead role in a new opera, where he stumbles into a case of murder; #4 in the Baroque Mystery series.


Charles O'Brien, Mute Witness (2001), about a deaf seamstress who helps an English actress investigate a murder during the years leading up to the French Revolution; #1 in the Anne Cartier series.

Charles O'Brien, Black Gold (2002), about a former actress who tutors deaf children and investigates a murder in Georgian Bath, England, assisted by a friend from Paris; #2 in the Anne Cartier series.

Charles O'Brien, Noble Blood (2004), about a woman who tutors deaf children and investigates the murder of a friend of Marie Antoinette after a deaf housemaid is accused of the crime; #3 in the Anne Cartier series.

Charles O'Brien, Lethal Beauty (2005), about a former actress who tutors deaf children and investigates the murder of a Paris artist during the period before the French Revolution; #4 in the Anne Cartier series.

Charles O'Brien, Fatal Carnival (2006), about a teacher of the deaf who investigates a twenty-year-old murder; #5 in the Anne Cartier series.

Charles O'Brien, Cruel Choices (2007), about a former tutor to deaf children whose search for a missing young woman uncovers a prostitution ring connected to the Marquis de Sade; #6 in the Anne Cartier series.

Charles O'Brien, Assassins' Rage (2008), about a husband and wife who investigate the murder of two high officials in Revolutionary Paris; #7 in the Anne Cartier series.


Jean-François Parot, The Châtelet Apprentice (2000 in the original French; first English translation 2013), about a young police detective investigating the disappearance of one of his superiors in 1761 Paris; #1 in the Nicolas Le Floch series. Review

Matt Rees, Mozart's Last Aria (2011), a mystery which imagines Mozart's sister Nannerl investigating her brother's untimely death.

Lou Jane Temple, Death du Jour (2006), about a cook for a wealthy household in Paris who must solve a murder mystery on the eve of the Revolution.


North America in the 18th Century

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Becky Akers, Halestorm (2012), a novel about Nathan Hale which imagines that he and another man were rivals for a woman's love; self-published.

Hervey Allen, The Forest and the Fort (1943), about a white man raised by the Shawnee in western Pennsylvania in the 1760s; #1 in the City of the Dawn series.

Hervey Allen, Bedford Village (1944), about a white man raised by the Shawnee in western Pennsylvania in the 1760s; #2 in the City of the Dawn series.

Hervey Allen, Toward the Morning (1948), about a white man raised by the Shawnee in western Pennsylvania in the 1760s; #3 in the City of the Dawn series.

Christine Blevins, The Tory Widow (2009), historical romance about a widow who is making her living running her late husband's business printing Tory propaganda when she encounters the ardent American patriot who awakened her passions with a kiss ten years earlier.

Christine Blevins, Midwife of the Blue Ridge (2008), about a Scottish midwife who becomes an indentured servant in order to pay for her voyage to America.

Christine Blevins, The Turning of Anne Merrick (2012), about a young man and woman in love who become spies for George Washington during the American Revolution.

Gwen Bristow, Celia Garth (1959), about a Charleston dressmaker recruited by Francis Marion, the "Swamp Fox," as a Patriot spy during the American Revolution.

Rita Mae Brown, Dolley (1994), about Dolley Madison, wife of the U.S. Founding Father James Madison.

Sally Cabot, Benjamin Franklin's Bastard (2013), about William Franklin, the son of Benjamin Franklin and his mistress, who was raised by Franklin's common-law wife and remained loyal to the Crown during the American Revolution.

John M. Cahill, Primitive Passions (2015), about an Irish deserter from the British Navy who becomes a fur trader in upstate New York and discovers he has a knack for negotiating between a Dutch colony and their Iroquois neighbors; #1 in the planned Boschloper Saga series.

Christian Cameron, Washington and Caesar (2004), abut George Washington and the slave he named Julius Caesar, who fought on opposite sides in the American Revolution. Review at http://historicalnovels-wcc.blogspot.co.il

Jimmy Carter, The Hornet's Nest (2003), about a man who migrates to Georgia with his wife and family on the eve of the Revolutionary War and experiences the war as it was fought in the Deep South.

David Chacko and Alexander Kulcsar, Gone Over (2009), about an American-born colonist who works as a spy for the British during the Revolutionary War; self-published.

Jerome Charyn, Johnny One-Eye (2008), a bawdy comic novel about a one-eyed rogue who joins Benedict Arnold as a spy for the British even though he suspects George Washington may be his father.

Barbara Chase-Riboud, Sally Hemings, about the slave woman with whom Thomas Jefferson had an affair. Review or Author Interview

Barbara Chase-Riboud, The President's Daughter, about the daughter of Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson; sequel to Sally Hemings.

Jennifer Chiaverini, Mrs. Lincoln’s Rival (2014), about Kate Chase Sprague, the politically astute Washington society hostess who gained the enmity of Mary Todd Lincoln.

Clare Clark, Savage Lands (2010), about a young woman who goes to French Louisiana in 1704 as part of a group sent to become wives for the colonists. Review or Author Interview


Edward Cline, Sparrowhawk Book One: Jack Frake, about an intelligent and restless young man who joins a group pressing for greater freedom in 1740s England, a harbinger of the American Revolution; #1 in the Sparrowhawk series.

Edward Cline, Sparrowhawk Book Two: Hugh Kenrick, about a talented but rebellious young English nobleman who gets in trouble for his political views; #2 in the Sparrowhawk series.

Edward Cline, Sparrowhawk Book Three: Caxton, the protagonists of Book One and Book Two meet in Colonial Virginia; #3 in the Sparrowhawk series.

Edward Cline, Sparrowhawk Book Four: Empire, about the anti-tax movement in the American Colonies; #4 in the Sparrowhawk series.

Edward Cline, Sparrowhawk Book Five: Revolution, about the American colonists’ resistance to the Stamp Act; #5 in the Sparrowhawk series.

Edward Cline, Sparrowhawk Book Six: War, about the final steps that set the stage for the Revolutionary War; #6 and last in the Sparrowhawk series.


James Fenimore Cooper, The Last of the Mohicans (1826), about a white man raised by Indians during the French and Indian War; set in 1757.

S. Copperstone, Bittersweet Tavern (2015), about a widowed barmaid who has an affair with a sea captain fighting for the American colonists.

Bernard Cornwell, Redcoat (1988), about the American Revolution from the perspective of a British soldier.

Bernard Cornwell, The Fort (2010), about the disastrous Penobscot Expedition of 1779.

Thomas B. Costain, High Towers (1949), about a young woman from Montreal who marries a brute instead of the man she loves in order to help her brother retain his position as governor of the New Orleans colony in French Louisiana.

Susan F. Craft, The Chamomile (2011), about a young woman in British-occupied Charlestown, South Carolina, who joins a group of Patriot spies in order to rescue her brother from a prison ship.

Ruth Cross, Soldier of Good Fortune (1936), about Louis St. Denis, the founder of the city of Natchitoches, Louisiana.

Jodi Daynard, The Midwife's Revolt (2015), about a widowed midwife who becomes friends with Abigail Adams in the early days of the Revolution and begins to have feelings for a man she suspects may be a Tory spy.

Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie, America’s First Daughter (2016), about Thomas Jefferson’s eldest daughter, Martha “Patsy” Jefferson Randolph.

Elizabeth Nell Dubus, Cajun (1986), about a family banished from Nova Scotia who settle in Louisiana and rise to wealth and power, and a French family which escapes the Revolution and struggles to rebuild their fortune in Louisiana.

Cindy Dyson, And She Was (2006), about the tragic decision that allows three women to survive the Russian conquest of the Aleutian Islands, and the effects on subsequent generations into the 1980s when a woman follows her boyfriend to Unalaska Island.

Robert Evans, Barbary Slave (2012), about a U.S. sailor captured by Barbary pirates in 1785 who, after years of slavery, becomes secretary to the Dey of Algiers; self-published.

Ben Farmer, Evangeline (forthcoming in April 2010), about a young Acadian woman, separated from her husband-to-be when the British drive the French out of Canada, who makes a ten-year journey overland to New Orleans in search of him.

Howard Fast, April Morning (1961), about a teenaged boy's experience of the Battle of Lexington and Concord on the eve of the American Revolution.

Howard Fast, Bunker Hill (2001; originally published 1994 as Seven Days in June), about the Battle of Bunker Hill in June 1775.

Howard Fast, The Crossing (1971), about Washington's crossing of the Delaware on Christmas Day 1776 to make a surprise attack on Hessian mercenaries fighting for the British.


J.E. Fender, The Private Revolution of Geoffrey Frost (2002), about an American seaman who becomes a privateer to harass the British fleet during the American Revolution; #1 in the Geoffrey Frost series.

J.E. Fender, Audacity, Privateer Out of Portsmouth (2003), about an American seaman who becomes a privateer to harass the British fleet during the American Revolution; #2 in the Geoffrey Frost series.

J.E. Fender, Our Lives, Our Fortunes (2004), about an American seaman who becomes a privateer to harass the British fleet during the American Revolution; #3 in the Geoffrey Frost series.

J.E. Fender, On the Spur of Speed (2005), about an American seaman who becomes a privateer to harass the British fleet during the American Revolution; #4 in the Geoffrey Frost series.

J.E. Fender, The Lucifer Cypher (2006), about an American seaman who becomes a privateer to harass the British fleet during the American Revolution; #5 in the Geoffrey Frost series.


Lion Feuchtwanger, Proud Destiny (1947), about Benjamin Franklin, sent to France in 1776 by the revolutionary government of what would become the United States, and his efforts to gain arms and aid from the French monarchy.

Kathy Fischer-Brown, Winter Fire (2010), about a young white woman raised by the Seneca Indians and the white man who finds her almost unconscious in a frozen creek and rescues her.

Tom Fitzgerald, Poor Richard's Lament: A Most Timely Tale (2012), about Benjamin Franklin looking back on his life 200 years after his death and visiting America in the 21st century to witness what has become of it.

Norman Gautreau, Island Of First Light (2004), about the men and women of a fictional island off the coast of Maine in the present day, and the expulsion of Acadiens from Nova Scotia in 1754.


Noel B. Gerson, Savage Gentleman (1950), about the capture of a colonial militia officer by the Seneca Indians in upper New York and his escape in 1707 during Queen Anne's War, the second of the four French and Indian Wars.

Noel B. Gerson, The Cumberland Rifles (1952), about a mercenary hired by the Spanish to influence the "state" of Franklin (later Tennessee) to become part of Spain's territories in the mid-1780s, who changes sides and helps defeat the Cherokee, allies of Spain.

Noel B. Gerson, The Forest Lord (1955), about the colony of Charles Towne (later Charleston) in the early 1700s and their defeat of the Westhoe Indians.

Noel B. Gerson, Daughter Of Eve (1958), about Pocahontas.

Noel B. Gerson, The Swamp Fox, Francis Marion (1967), a biographical novel about South Carolina's Francis Marion, focusing on his military service during the Revolutionary War.


Janice Holt Giles, The Kentuckians, about a pioneer family in 1775 Kentucky; #1 in the Kentuckians series.

Janice Holt Giles, Hannah Fowler, about a pioneer woman in Kentucky; #2 in the Kentuckians series.

Janice Holt Giles, The Land Beyond the Mountains, about General James Wilkinson’s conspiracy with the Spanish to detach Kentucky from the U.S. and create his own empire there; #3 in the Kentuckians series.

Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen, To Try Men's Souls (2009), about George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River during the Revolutionary War.

Newt Gingrich and William Fortschen, Valley Forge (2010), about General George Washington and his army at Valley Forge in the winter of 1777; sequel to To Try Men's Souls.

Kathleen Grissom, The Kitchen House (2010), about a white indentured servant who grows up working with black slaves in the kitchen of a Virginia tobacco plantation, and then finds her loyalties divided after she marries the plantation owner's son.

Lauren Groff, The Monsters of Templeton (2008), about a present-day woman, descended from a famous author, who returns to her hometown in upstate New York and researches her ancestors going back to the town's founding in the late eighteenth century. Review

Sally Gunning, The Rebellion of Jane Clarke (2010), about a young woman who goes to stay with her aunt in Boston, where she begins to question the fervor of the colonists who oppose British rule as she sees honesty becoming a casualty.

Sally Gunning, Bound (2008), about an indentured servant in eighteenth century New England. Review

Richard A. Hackett Jr., The Black Dragons (2012), about friends growing up on a North Carolina tobacco plantation who find their attempts to protect local families attract attention from world powers; self-published.

Barbara Hambly, Patriot Hearts (2007), about the wives and mistresses of four Founding Fathers, Martha Custis Washington, Abigail Adams, Sally Hemings, and Dolley Madison.

William C. Hammond, A Matter of Honor (2010), about a teenager who joins the crew of John Paul Jones during the American Revolution in order to avenge his brother's death on a British naval vessel; #1 in the Cutler Family series.

William C. Hammond, For Love of Country (2010), about a Boston shipowner who sets out to rescue his brother after the family ship is captured by Barbary pirates; #2 in the Cutler Family series.

William Heath, Blacksnake's Path (2009), about William Wells, who lived as a Miami Indian after being captured in 1784 at age thirteen, and later worked as a scout for the U.S. Army, as a translator and as an Indian agent.

Lars D. Hedbor, The Prize (2011), a coming-of-age story about a young man in Colonial Vermont whose father is away serving with Ethan Allen's Green Mountain Boys when the war comes to the family farm on Lake Champlain.

Lawrence Hill, Someone Knows My Name (2008; titled The Book of Negroes in Canada), about a woman kidnapped as a child in West Africa in 1745 and transported to America as a slave who clings to the hope of regaining her freedom.

J.M. Hochstetler, Daughter of Liberty, about a young woman who sympathizes with the American revolutionaries and the handsome officer in the British army to whom she feels attracted; Christian message; #1 in the American Patriot series.

J.M. Hochstetler, Native Son, about a young woman who works as both a doctor's assistant and a spy for the American revolutionaries, and the army officer she loves; Christian message; #2 in the American Patriot series.

Alice Hoffman, The Red Garden (2011), linked short stories, some with a touch of magical realism, set in a small town in Massachusetts from 1750 through the present. Review or Author Interview

A.E. Hotchner, Louisiana Purchase (1996), about a French aristocrat sent to colonial Louisiana in the mid-eighteenth century after getting into trouble at court.

Henry Howell, The Distant Empire (2007), about a young man in colonial French Louisiana; self-published.

Pamela Jekel, Natchez (1995), about a Connecticut man who experiences tragedy during his family's migration to Natchez, Louisiana, in the mid-eighteenth century.

Cameron Judd, Boone: A Novel of an American Legend (2005), about the westward trailblazer Daniel Boone.

Michael Kilian, Major Washington (1998), about three years in the life of George Washington from 1753-1755, while he was an officer in the British army.

Sheila Kohler, Bluebird, or the Invention of Happiness (2007), about an aristocratic Frenchwoman who survives the Revolution and immigrates to the American Hudson River Valley.

Deryn Lake, The Governor's Ladies (2005), about the British Governor of Massachusetts and his American wife, who have opposing views on the impending American Revolution.

Rosalind Laker, New World, New Love (2003), about a refugee from the French Revolution who finds love in eighteenth century America.

M. M. Le Blanc, Evangeline: Paradise Stolen (2011), about two lovers separated in 1755 when the British drive the French out of Canada; self-published.

J.R. Lindermuth, The Accidental Spy (2008), about a rogue who falls in love and, by accident, becomes a hero during the Revolutionary War.

Gerard Mac, The Way It Was (2008), about a group of wealthy young men and women in Boston who must decide whether to remain loyal to the British or to join the American Revolution.

Antonine Maillet, Pélagie: the Return to Acadie (original French edition 1979, English translation 1982), about an Acadian woman forced to leave Canada during the Great Disruption of 1755, who journeys back to Canada after fifteen years of slavery in Georgia; won the 1979 Prix Goncourt.

William Martin, Citizen Washington (1999), a biographical novel about George Washington, narrated by a variety of the people who knew him, from his slaves to John and Abigail Adams.


F. Van Wyck Mason, Rivers of Glory (1942), about a young American lieutenant who serves as a spy during the American Revolution.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Three Harbours (1938), about three brothers during the early part of the American Revolution, as ships are built in Norfolk while Boston and Bermuda are blockaded by the British; available in an omnibus edition, Roads to Liberty.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Stars on the Sea (1940), about a crewman on a privateer ship during the American Revolution and his attraction to a sweet girl at home and a lusty Creole in the Caribbean; available in an omnibus edition, Roads to Liberty.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Eagle in the Sky (1948), about three young doctors during the last difficult years of the American Revolution, when the assistance of a small French naval squadron offered a slim hope of defeating the British; available in an omnibus edition, Roads to Liberty.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Wild Horizon (1966), about the Battle of King's Mountain during the American Revolution; available in an omnibus edition, Roads to Liberty.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Roads to Liberty (1968), an omnibus edition that includes Three Harbors, Stars on the Sea, Eagle in the Sky and Wild Horizon.

F. Van Wyck Mason, The Young Titan (1959), about the capture of a fortress in Nova Scotia by American soldiers in 1745 during the French and Indian War.

F. Van Wyck Mason, Guns for Rebellion (1977), about a British naval artillery officer wrongly accused of firing on British troops who deserts to the American rebels.


Sharyn McCrumb, King’s Mountain (2013), about a homesteader in the Carolina mountains who joins an American militia to fight in the Revolution after the British threaten Carolina settlers' farms.

Patrick McGrath, Martha Peake: A Novel of the Revolution (2000), about the daughter of a disfigured Englishman and her escape to the Colonies in the years just before the American Revolution

Jack McLaughlin, Williamsburg: Virginia on the Eve of Revolution (2008), about an attractive London widow sent to Williamsburg to spy on the colony's governor, and a Boston merchant who arrives to arouse opposition to the British; self-published.

Elizabeth Shown Mills, Isle of Canes (2004), a family saga beginning in French Louisiana near Nachitoches in 1735 featuring a family that rose from slavery and later owned slaves themselves.

Wu Ming, Manituana (2009), about a Mohawk war chief who sees the harmony of a community of Irish, Scots and Native Americans threatened when the American Revolution breaks out, and travels to New York, Canada and London in an attempt to save it; authored collectively by the five Italians who wrote Q and 54.

Siri Mitchell, The Messenger (2012), about a young Quaker woman whose brother runs away from home to join the rebel army during the American Revolution; Christian message.

Robert Morgan, Brave Enemies, about a young bride who dresses as a man to fight in the Revolutionary War after her husband is captured by the British.

Nancy Moser, Washington's Lady (2008), about Martha Custis Washington, the wife of George Washington; Christian message.

Alice Munro, The View from Castle Rock (2006), a short story collection inspired by the experiences of the author and her Canadian ancestors, beginning with eighteenth-century immigrants from Scotland.

Alex Myers, Revolutionary (2014), about Deborah Samson, an indentured servant who disguised herself as a man and fought in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.


James L. Nelson, By Force of Arms (1997), about an American ship captain who scuttles his ship rather than surrender to the British as the Revolutionary War begins; #1 in the Revolution at Sea series.

James L. Nelson, The Maddest Idea (1997), about an American ship captain captured by the British when he sails to Bermuda to seize a store of their gunpowder; #2 in the Revolution at Sea series.

James L. Nelson, The Continental Risque (1998), about an American ship captain serving in the new United States Navy in 1776 who must cope with both the British Navy and a crew on the brink of mutiny; #3 in the Revolution at Sea series.

James L. Nelson, Lords of the Ocean (1999), about an American ship captain who faces unexpected challenges while he carries Benjamin Franklin to France; #4 in the Revolution at Sea series.

James L. Nelson, All the Brave Fellows (2000), about an American ship captain who while sailing to Philadelphia with his wife and child to accept a new command in the Revolutionary War discovers the entire British fleet is in his path; #5 in the Revolution at Sea series.

James L. Nelson, The Guardship (2000), about a man who gives up his life as a pirate in order to settle in Williamsburg, Virginia, where he gains command of the town's guardship; #1 in the Brethren of the Coast series.

James L. Nelson, The Blackbirder (2001), about a former pirate sent to hunt down a black pirate, a former friend who slaughtered the crew of a slave ship; #2 in the Brethren of the Coast series.

James L. Nelson, The Pirate Round (2002), about a former pirate whose voyage to the Indian Ocean puts him on course to encounter some dangerous enemies out of his past; #3 in the Brethren of the Coast series.


David Nevin, Eagle's Cry: A Novel of the Louisiana Purchase (2000), about Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr and the Louisiana purchase; #2 in the American Story series.


Kerry Newcomb, Call Down Thunder, about a Mississippi River boatman at the end of the eighteenth century.

Kerry Newcomb, Guns of Liberty, about a plot to murder George Washington during the Revolutionary War.

Kerry Newcomb, War Path, set during the eighteenth century French and Indian War.


Diana Norman, A Catch of Consequence, about a patriotic American woman who lands in trouble when she rescues an upperclass Englishman from drowning during the Boston Tea Party.

Diana Norman, Taking Liberties, about two women during the early days of the American Revolution; sequel to A Catch of Consequence.

Leonardo Noto, The Life of a Colonial Fugitive (2012), about a soldier in the Revolutionary War who flees an unfair war crimes charge and joins a mercenary force fighting in Siam; self-published.

Stephen O’Connor, Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings (2016), a literary novel which explores the damaging effects of slavery through the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and his enslaved mistress Sally Hemings, including imagined scenes that reach into the present day.

Allison Pataki, The Traitor’s Wife (2014), about Peggy Shippen Arnold, the wife of Benedict Arnold.

Thomas Pynchon, Mason & Dixon, about the eighteenth century surveyors who laid out the boundary line between the states of the North and South in the U.S.

Anne Rice, Interview with the Vampire (1976), about a 200-year-old vampire who began as a young indigo planter in Louisiana distraught over his brother's suicide; #1 in the Vampire Chronicles series, in which the later books have progressively less realistic historical content.

Conrad Richter, The Free Man (1943), about a German boy who emigrates to America, becomes an indentured servant in Philadelphia, and struggles for freedom.

Conrad Richter, Country of Strangers (1966), about a white girl raised by Indians who is returned to her white father after a 1764 peace treaty.


Kenneth Lewis Roberts, Boon Island (1956), about men struggling to survive after a shipwreck off the Maine coast in 1710.

Kenneth Lewis Roberts, Northwest Passage, about a military officer who fought in the French and Indian War.

Kenneth Lewis Roberts, Oliver Wiswell, about British loyalists during the American Revolution.

Kenneth Lewis Roberts, Arundel, about a young man during the Revolutionary War; includes a sympathetic portrayal of Benedict Arnold; #1 in the Chronicles of Arundel series.

Kenneth Lewis Roberts, Rabble in Arms, about the origin of the U.S. Navy during the Revolutionary War; includes a sympathetic portrayal of Benedict Arnold; #2 in the Chronicles of Arundel series (series continues during the War of 1812: see 19th Century U.S. page).


Lucia St. Clair Robson, Shadow Patriots (2006), about a woman who spied for George Washington during the American Revolution.

Dana Fuller Ross, Yankee Rogue (1984), about a disgraced British officer who comes to America in the 1740s as an indentured servant at the time of the French and Indian Wars and becomes a cavalry leader in the colonial militia; Dana Fuller Ross is a pen name used by Noel B. Gerson.

William Safire, Scandalmonger (2000), about James Thomson Callender, a journalist secretly hired by Thomas Jefferson to sully Alexander Hamilton's reputation, and who later exposed Jefferson's relationship with his slave Sally Hemings. Review at http://historicalnovels-wcc.blogspot.co.il

Nicole Salomone, Forgotten (2011), about a society woman who, after disaster strikes, becomes a camp follower of the Continental Army and learns medicine and surgery during the American Revolution; self-published.

Shirley Seifert, River Out of Eden (1940), about a New Orleans merchant's son who travels up the Mississippi River to Illinois in the late eighteenth century.

Shirley Seifert, Waters of the Wilderness (1941), about George Rogers Clark and his struggle to hold the Illinois and Kentucky territories during 1778-1780 after they have been won from the British for the United States of America.

Shirley Seifert, Never No More (1964), about Daniel Boone's wife Rebecca.

Mary Lee Settle, O Beulah Land, about the founding of a West Virginia town in the early part of the eighteenth century; #2 (but the first written) in the Beulah Quintet series, which covers a range of time periods.

Jeff Shaara, Rise to Rebellion, about the American Revolution.

Jeff Shaara, The Glorious Cause, about the American Revolution; sequel to Rise to Rebellion.

Katy Simpson Smith, The Story of Land and Sea (2014), about a family in coastal North Carolina during the American Revolution, and the generations that follow.

Katy Simpson Smith, Free Men (2016), about an escaped slave, a white orphan, and a Creek Indian who are being tracked down for murder in the American South.

John Smolens, The Schoolmaster’s Daughter (2011), about Abigail Lovell, who despite her father's loyalist sympathies joins her two brothers in spying and smuggling for the American Revolutionaries.

Linda Spalding, The Purchase (2013), about a Quaker family opposed to slavery who move from Pennsylvania to the Virginia frontier in 1798, where slaves are the only farm workers available.

Carol Spradling, Cost of Freedom (2008), historical romance about a Boston woman loyal to England who, on the eve of the Revolution, is shocked to discover her childhood friend supports the Sons of Liberty.

Tom Standage, The Turk: The Life and Times of the Famous Eighteenth Century Chess Playing Machine, about an inventor who travels through eighteenth century Europe and America.


G.G. Stokes, Jr., The Road to Bloody Marsh (2009), about an Englishman, a Frenchman, and a Spaniard fighting in King George's War in Georgia in the 1730s; #1 (chronologically by setting) in the Colonial Southeast series.

G.G. Stokes, Jr., Loving Lynn Celia (2008), about a young married couple in southeastern America during the French and Indian War in the 1750s and 1760s; #2 (chronologically by setting) in the Colonial Southeast series.

G.G. Stokes, Jr., Letters for Catherine (2009), about a young Colonial soldier incarcerated on a prison ship in Charleston Harbor in the early 1780s; #3 (chronologically by setting) in the Colonial Southeast series.

G.G. Stokes, Jr., A Lesser Form Of Patriotism (2008), about a Loyalist soldier fighting in the King's Carolina Rangers in the Southeast from 1779 to 1782 during the American Revolution; #4 (chronologically by setting) in the Colonial Southeast series.


Irving Stone, Those Who Love (1965), about John Adams and his wife Abigail, the second President and First Lady of the United States.

Beverly Swerling, Shadowbrook: A Novel of Love, War and the Birth of America (2003), a novel set during the French and Indian War about two men raised as brothers on a Manhattan Island plantation and the woman who loves one of them but also wishes to become a nun.

Elswyth Thane, Dawn’s Early Light, about two Virginia families during the Revolutionary War; #1 in the Williamsburg novels (#2-#7 continue from the Civil War through the World War II periods).

James Alexander Thom, Long Knife (1994), about George Rogers Clark, who set out to conquer the territory between the Ohio and Mississippi rivers for the United States during the years immediately following the Revolution.

James Alexander Thom, The Red Heart (1997), about a girl from a Pennsylvania Quaker family who grows up with the Lenape Indians after they abduct her during the time of the Revolutionary War.

Harold Titus, Crossing the River (2011), about the Battle of Concord on April 19, 1775; self-published.

Nancy E. Turner, My Name Is Resolute (2014), about a Jamaican woman captured by pirates and sold into slavery in New England in the years before the American Revolution.


Carter Vaughan, Dragon Cove, (1955), about the American Revolutionaries' guerilla operations against the British in Boston in 1778; Carter Vaughan is a pseudonym of Noel B. Gerson.

Carter Vaughan, The Invincibles (1958), about the capture by American colonial forces of the French Fort Louisbourg in Nova Scotia in 1745 in King George's War, the third of the four French and Indian Wars; Carter Vaughan is a pen name of Noel B. Gerson.

Carter Vaughan, The Wilderness (1959), about a colonial spy operating against the French during the French and Indian War in 1753; Carter Vaughan is a pen name of Noel B. Gerson.

Carter Vaughan, The Yankee Brig (1960), about the captain of a Colonial brig of war in the 1740s during the French and Indian Wars; Carter Vaughan is a pseudonym of Noel B. Gerson.

Carter Vaughan, The Yankee Rascals (1963), about one of General Washington's young officers, captured by the British in 1776, and his escape; Carter Vaughan is a pseudonym of Noel B. Gerson.

Carter Vaughan, Scoundrel's Brigade (1964), about the efforts of the American Revolutionaries to prevent the British from destroying the Colonial economy by counterfeiting Colonial money in 1777; Carter Vaughan is a pen name of Noel B. Gerson.

Carter Vaughan, Roanoke Warrior (1965), about a colony on the North Carolina coast and its conflicts with the Tuscarora Indians in 1711; Carter Vaughan is a pseudonym of Noel B. Gerson.

Carter Vaughan, Fortress Fury (1966), about the soldiers in Pennsylvania's Fort Pitt, an American headquarters for the western theatre of the Revolutionary War; Carter Vaughan is a pseudonym of Noel B. Gerson.


Gore Vidal, Burr (1973), a biographical novel about Aaron Burr.

Christine Wade, Seven Locks (2013), about a farm woman near the Catskills whose husband abandons her and their children on the eve of the American Revolution.

Juliet Waldron, Independent Heart (2005), a romantic novel about a New York heiress abducted during the Revolutionary War by a British officer she despises.

Juliet Waldron, Genesee (2005), a romantic novel about a woman of mixed white and Iroquois blood during the Revolutionary War; available in ebook form only.

Ben Ames Williams, Come Spring (1940), about a young woman and her family who settle in the Maine wilderness during the Revolutionary War period, founding what would become the town of Union, Maine.

Pat Winter, Woman Called Arkansas (originally published in 1986 under the title River of Destiny), about a French explorer who falls in love with an Indian woman while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River.

Frank Yerby, Bride of Liberty (1954), about a woman in love with the man engaged to marry her sister during the American Revolution.

Frank Yerby, Jarrett's Jade (1959), about a Highland Scot who settles in the American South in 1736 and falls in love with a woman he buys at a slave auction.


Mysteries and Thrillers: 18th Century North America

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Suzanne Adair, Paper Woman (2006), about a twice-widowed printer's daughter trying to uncover the truth about her father's murder in 1780 in a Georgia village near a Creek Indian settlement.

Suzanne Adair, The Blacksmith's Daughter (2007), mystery/suspense about the seventeen-year-old wife of a cobbler in Augusta, Georgia, who discovers that her husband may be involved with a rebel spy ring during the Revolutionary War; sequel to Paper Woman.

Suzanne Adair, Camp Follower (2008), mystery/suspense about a woman who writes a society page for a loyalist magazine in Wilmington, North Carolina, whose assignment takes her into a British encampment where she finds her life at risk during the turmoil leading to the Battle of Cowpens in the Revolutionary War.


Robert Lee Hall, Benjamin Franklin Takes the Case (1988), Benjamin Franklin turns sleuth; #1 in the Benjamin Franklin mystery series.

Robert Lee Hall, Benjamin Franklin and a Case of Christmas Murder (1990), Benjamin Franklin turns sleuth; #2 in the Benjamin Franklin mystery series.

Robert Lee Hall, Murder at Drury Lane (1992), a mystery which imagines Benjamin Franklin investigating arson and murder at a playhouse while visiting England in 1758; #3 in the Benjamin Franklin mystery series.

Robert Lee Hall, Benjamin Franklin and the Case of Artful Murder (1994), Benjamin Franklin investigates the theft of a diamond; #4 in the Benjamin Franklin mystery series.

Robert Lee Hall, Murder by the Waters (1995), Benjamin Franklin suspects an attack on the coach in which he is traveling to Bath may not have been all it seemed; #5 in the Benjamin Franklin mystery series.

Robert Lee Hall, London Blood (1997), a mystery which imagines Benjamin Franklin investigating a series of murders of young women in London; #6 in the Benjamin Franklin mystery series.


Barbara Hamilton, The Ninth Daughter (2009), a mystery set in 1773 in which Abigail Adams (not yet First Lady) turns sleuth when she stumbles across a woman's corpse and her husband is accused of murdering the woman; #1 in the Abigail Adams mystery series.

Barbara Hamilton, A Marked Man (2010), a mystery featuring Abigail Adams as sleuth, trying to clear the name of a man accused of murder, with whom her young servant girl is in love; #2 in the Abigail Adams mystery series.

Barbara Hamilton, Sup with the Devil (2011), a mystery featuring Abigail Adams, the wife of attorney John Adams, who agrees to investigate a murder attempt on her nephew Horace after he is hired to translate an Arabic text involving pirate treasure; #3 in the Abigail Adams mystery series.


D.B. Jackson, Thieftaker (2012), historical fantasy set in Colonial Boston about a crime-solving sorcerer whose efforts to recover a murdered woman's necklace bring him into conflict with a more powerful sorcerer.

Jane Kamensky and Jill Lepore, Blindspot (2008), about a portrait painter, a fallen woman disguised as his male apprentice, and an Oxford-educated African-born doctor in pre-Revolutionary Boston who set out to find the truth after a revolutionary leader is murdered the day his portrait is to be painted.


Eleanor Kuhns, A Simple Murder (2012), about a former soldier who goes to a Shaker community in 1796 Maine in search of his son and becomes involved in investigating the murder of a young Shaker woman; #1 in the Will Rees mystery series.

Eleanor Kuhns, Death of a Dyer (2013), about a Maine farmer in 1796 who agrees to investigate the murder of an old friend; #2 in the Will Rees mystery series.

Eleanor Kuhns, Cradle to Grave (2014), about a Maine farmer and his wife who try to prove the innocence of a friend of theirs, a Shaker woman accused of kidnapping and murder; #3 in the Will Rees mystery series.


Margaret Lawrence, Hearts and Bones, about a midwife's struggle to investigate a murder during a brutal Maine winter in 1786; #1 in the Hannah Trevor mystery series.

Margaret Lawrence, Blood Red Roses, about a midwife who investigates a murder in late eighteenth century Maine; #2 in the Hannah Trevor mystery series.

Margaret Lawrence, The Burning Bride, about a midwife who investigates a murder in late eighteenth century Maine; #3 in the Hannah Trevor mystery series.

Margaret Lawrence, The Iceweaver (2000), a stand-alone novel about Hannah Trevor's deaf daughter in 1809 New York State.


David Liss, The Whiskey Rebels (2008), a thriller about a former spy for George Washington and a woman pioneer who, independently, become involved in Alexander Hamilton's development of the Bank of the United States and the Whiskey Rebellion during the 1790s. Review


Eliot Pattison, Bone Rattler (2007), about a medically trained Scot sent to America on a convict ship where he becomes witness to a series of murders and apparent suicides; #1 in the Bone Rattler series.

Eliot Pattison, Eye of the Raven (2009), about a Scot whose Nipmuc Indian friend is accused of murder after they find a dying Virginian officer nailed to an Indian shrine tree; #2 in the Bone Rattler series.

Eliot Pattison, Original Death (2013), about a Scot and his Nipmuc Indian friend who must find out who massacred a group of Christian Nipmucs during the French and Indian War; #3 in the Bone Rattler series. Review


Michael Schein, Just Deceits: A Historical Courtroom Mystery (2008), about the 1793 trial for adultery and infanticide of Richard Randolph and his sister-in-law Nancy Randolph, who were defended by John Marshall and Patrick Henry. Review

Donald Smith, The Constable's Tale (2015), about a county constable in North Carolina who investigates the murder of a farm family during the French and Indian War. Review

Andrew Taylor, The Scent of Death (2013), about a British civil servant sent to New York during the American Revolution to assist Loyalists with property claims, where he also pursues a murder investigation. Review at The Guardian

Donna Thorland, The Turncoat (2013), a romantic thriller about a Quaker woman who spies for the American Revolution, and the British officer she loves; #2 in the Renegades of the Revolution series. Review

Donna Thorland, The Rebel Pirate (2014), a romantic thriller about a Boston woman, the daughter of a pirate, who becomes a privateer for the American patriots, and the British officer she loves; #2 in the Renegades of the Revolution series.

Donna Thorland, Mistress Firebrand (2015), about an American actress who aspires to perform in London and sets her sights on British General John Burgoyne during the American Revolution; #3 in the Renegades of the Revolution series.

Donna Thorland, The Dutch Girl (2016), about a beautiful young finishing school teacher in the Hudson River Valley, who is committed to the Revolution, and the highwayman in league with the British who waylays her carriage in 1778; #4 in the Renegades of the Revolution series.


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