Novels of the Late 13th, 14th and 15th Centuries in Europe:

Including the Plantagenet Kings of England, the Hundred Years' War and Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc

Jump to:

Edward I to the Wars of the Roses
Mysteries and Thrillers: 14th-15th Century British Isles
The Hundred Years' War
The Black Plague
The English Peasants' Rebellion
Scotland
The Continent and Mediterranean, 14th-15th Centuries
Mysteries: The Continent, 14th-15th Centuries

The period from England's King Edward I in the late thirteenth century through the end of the Hundred Years' War in the mid-fifteenth century was an eventful one offering rich material for historical novels. It featured wars with Wales and Scotland that brought these once independent nations under English rule; a century-long war with France in which a young French peasant girl, Joan of Arc, turned the tide of war against England and was martyred for it; a peasant's rebellion; and outbreaks of the Black Plague.


Edward I to the Wars of the Roses

King Edward I (popularly known as "Longshanks" because of his unusual height) ascended to the throne of England in 1272. He pursued aggressive military policies against Wales and Scotland, both of which were essentially under English control by the end of the thirteenth century. (See the Medieval Celts page for novels set in Wales and Scotland during his reign.) His son, Edward II succeeded him in 1307 and continued to make war against Scotland. Edward III began the Hundred Years' War with his claim to the French throne. His grandson Richard II (the son of Edward the Black Prince and Joan of Kent) was only 10 when his grandfather died, leaving him king. During his minority, John of Gaunt (would would father an ancestor of the Tudor kings with his mistress Katherine Swynford) served as regent. Henry IV and Henry V, renowned from Shakespeare's plays, would continue the war against France. Under Henry VI, England lost the Hundred Years' War. This weak and mentally unstable king set the stage for the Wars of the Roses.


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Peter Ackroyd, The Clerkenwell Tales (2005), about a young nun who predicts a series of terrifying explosions in 1399 that in fact happen, amid the conflicts between Richard II and Henry Bolingbroke.

Vanessa Alexander, The Love Knot (1999), a love story about Edward II's sister Joan of Acre and her second husband, Ralph de Monthermer.

Prudence Andrew, The Hooded Falcon (1960), about the deformed younger son of an English lord on the Welsh border in the years after Owen Glendower's rebellion.

Prudence Andrew, A Sparkle from the Coal (1965), about a fourteenth-century Oxford student who abandons his education to become a Christian hermit.

Elizabeth Ashworth, An Honourable Estate (2012), about a nobleman outlawed after he joins a rebellion against the Earl of Lancaster during the reign of Edward II; self-published.

Margaret Campbell Barnes, Within the Hollow Crown (1941), about King Richard II of England, who came to the throne in 1377 at the age of ten.

Margaret Campbell Barnes, Isabel the Fair (1957), about Queen Isabella, wife of Edward II.

Maggie Bennett, Strangers and Pilgrims (2010), about a young lawyer who becomes a Franciscan friar after his wife dies in 1340, a decision called into question when he meets the attractive daughter of an impoverished knight.

Maggie Bennett, Every Noble Knight (2012), about a young English knight injured in the Battle of Poitiers who falls in love with a girl whose father insists they wait four years after their betrothal to marry; Christian message.

Vanora Bennett, The Queen's Lover (2009; also titled Blood Royal), about Catherine de Valois, the widow of King Henry V and future grandmother of Henry VII, and her love for the Welsh commoner Owen Tudor.

Pamela Bennetts, She-Wolf (1975), about Queen Isabella, the wife of Edward II and mother of Edward III.

D.J. Birmingham, The Queen's Tale (2007), historical fantasy about a centuries-old brooch in which the soul of an Irish queen is imprisoned, and the fourteenth-century leaders of England and Scotland who wish to possess it; self-published. Brief critique

Emma Campion, The King's Mistress (2009), a sympathetic novel about Alice Perrers, the widely disliked mistress of King Edward III. Review

David Charles, The Switch (2002), a novel based on the author's theory that Edward III was not Edward II's son.

Will Davenport, The Sinner's Tale (2005; also titled The Perfect Sinner), about a British woman who returns to her home village after her political career is derailed, where she discovers the tale of a fifteenth-century knight and slips back in time to meet her ancestors.

Daphne du Maurier, The House on the Strand (1969), about a man who can't resist time-traveling into fourteenth-century Cornwall despite the danger.

Michael Eardley, Letter from Poitou (2004), about Eve de Clavering and her life as a lady-in-waiting to Queen Isabella at the courts of Edward II and Edward III; self-published.

Jean Evans, Brittle Glory (1977), a sympathetic novel about Queen Isabella, the wife of Edward II.

Eleanor Fairburn, The Green Popinjays (1962), about Lady Lucia de Thweng, a notorious Yorkshire beauty during the reigns of Edward I and II. Review

Colin Falconer, Isabella: Braveheart of France (2013), about the French Princess Isabella, betrothed at age twelve to Edward II of England, who discovers she cannot compete with his favorite Piers Gaveston.

Edith Felber, Queen of Shadows (2006), a sympathetic novel about Queen Isabella, the wife of Edward II.

Ken Follett, World Without End (2007), a sequel to Pillars of the Earth which can be read as a stand-alone novel; set in fourteenth-century England. Review

Denise Giardina, Good King Harry (1984), a novel about King Henry V written in the form of an autobiography.

Blythe Gifford, The Harlot's Daughter (2007), historical romance about a daughter of Edward III and his notorious mistress Alice Perrers.

William Golding, The Spire (1964), about a fourteenth-century dean of Salisbury Cathedral who becomes obsessed with adding a tall spire to the cathedral despite warnings that the building is not strong enough to support it.

Alice Walworth Graham, The Vows of the Peacock (1955), about a daughter of the Earl of Warwick and the plot to overthrow Edward II.

Karen Harper, The First Princess of Wales (2006), the romantic fourteenth-century story of Joan of Kent and Edward the Black Prince.


Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Founding (1980), about a sheep farmer in who in 1434 arranges an ambitious marriage between his son and a reluctant ward of the influential Beaufort family; #1 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Dark Rose (1981), about a great-grandson of the couple who marry in The Founding, the enmity between his two sons, one legitimate and one not, and his niece who becomes a maid-in-waiting to Anne Boleyn; #2 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Princeling (1981; also titled The Distant Wood), about a Catholic family and the challenges they face as England becomes a Protestant country; #3 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Oak Apple (1982), about two brothers, one of whom fights in the Royalist army under Prince Rupert, while the other marries a Puritan; #4 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Black Pearl (1982), about a family's attempt to regain its wealth and position after the devastation of the English Civil War as the Commonwealth period comes to an end; #5 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Long Shadow (1983), about the changing fortunes of an English family when Charles II dies and the accession of James II, a Catholic, reawakens religious conflicts; #6 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Chevalier (1984), about a woman who follows James II into exile, leaving her grandson, who makes an unwise marriage, in charge of the family estate; #7 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Maiden (1985), about a man who marries to safeguard the family estate, and his intelligent daughter, who struggles to preserve it in spite of her dissolute husband; #8 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Flood Tide (1986), about three branches of a family, one restoring their fortunes under George III, another involved in the brewing American Revolution, and a third living in France as tensions rise that will lead to another revolution; #9 in the Morland Dynasty series.

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Tangled Thread (1987), about an English family's illegitimate scion living in France, where he tries desperately to protect himself and his daughter from the guillotine amid the French Revolution; #10 in the Morland Dynasty series. See the Napoleonic page for #11-14.


Molly Costain Haycraft, The King's Daughters (1971), about two daughters of Edward I, Elizabeth and Joan.

Joanna Hickson, The Agincourt Bride (2012), about Catherine of Valois, the French princess who married King Henry V of England and later, through her secret marriage to Owen Tudor, founded the Tudor dynasty, narrated by her nursemaid.

Susan Higginbotham, The Traitor's Wife: A Novel of the Reign of Edward II (2005), about Eleanor de Clare, a niece of Edward II and wife of the notorious Hugh le Despenser, charged with treason when Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer depose the king. Review

Susan Higginbotham, Hugh and Bess: A Love Story (2007), about Eleanor de Clare's son Hugh and his wife Bess, reluctant partners in an arranged marriage in the time of King Edward III; sequel to The Traitor's Wife. See Review or Interview with Susan Higginbotham

Daisy Hildyard, Hunters in the Snow (2013), about a woman of the present who discovers an unusual history of England written by her dead grandfather, beginning with the invention of the printing press in 1436. Review at The Independent

Brenda Honeyman, The Queen and Mortimer (1974), a sympathetic novel about Edward II, his queen Isabella, and her lover Roger Mortimer; followed by a prequel, The King's Minions.

Brenda Honeyman, The King's Minions (1974), about the love affair between Edward II and Piers Gaveston; prequel to The Queen and Mortimer.

Chris Hunt, Gaveston (1992), a sympathetic novel narrated by Edward II about his love affair with Piers Gaveston.

Rosemary Hawley Jarman, Crown in Candlelight (1978), about Katherine of Valois, the ancestress of the Tudor kings.

Dedwydd Jones, The Lily and the Dragon (2002), about Owain Tudor and Catherine of Valois during the period after the Battle of Agincourt.

Annelise Kamada, A Love So Bold (1978), historical romance about Edward II, Isabella and Roger Mortimer.

Annelise Kamada, A Banner Red and Gold (1980), historical romance about a woman who falls in love with Roger Mortimer; sequel to A Love So Bold.

Janet Kilbourne, Where Nobles Tread (1975), about Isabella, Edward II and Piers Gaveston; written by a 17-year-old author.

Jane Lane, A Secret Chronicle (1977), about Edward II's daughter Joan, Queen of Scotland, and her efforts to understand the events of her father's reign.

Janet Lane, Tabor's Trinket (2006), historical romance about a Gypsy woman and a wounded nobleman in fifteenth-century England; #1 in the Coin Forest series

Janet Lane, Emerald Silk (2008), historical romance about a half-Gypsy woman raised by nobility and the Gypsy tribal king she marries in fifteenth-century England; #2 in the Coin Forest series.

Jennifer Lang, The Crowning City, historical romance about a London merchant's daughter and three interesting men, including the legendary Dick Whittington; 1994 U.K. publication, hard to find in the U.S.

Hilda Lewis, Wife to Henry V (1957), about Catherine of Valois, the French princess who married Henry V in 1420 after he defeated France.

Hilda Lewis, I, Jacqueline (1957; reissued 2008), about Jacqueline of Hainault, a fifteenth-century Flemish noblewoman whose marriages plunged her into the midst of the power politics of her time.

Hilda Lewis, Harlot Queen (1970), about Isabella of France, the wife of King Edward II.


Norah Lofts, The Town House (1959), a family saga which begins with a serf born in 1381 who wins his freedom and builds a house in a town in Suffolk, England; #1 in the Suffolk Trilogy.

Norah Lofts, The House at Old Vine (1961), a family saga about the descendants of a serf who won his freedom and built a house in Suffolk, England; #2 in the Suffolk Trilogy.

Norah Lofts, The House at Sunset (1962), a family saga about the descendants of a serf who won his freedom and built a house in Suffolk, England; #3 in the Suffolk Trilogy.

Norah Lofts, The Maude Reed Tale (1972), about a girl in fifteenth-century England who would like to become a wool merchant like her father, but must learn to be a lady instead.

Norah Lofts, Knight's Acre (1975), about the wife of a knight who must cope with a plague epidemic, among other hardships, while her husband is away; #1 in the Sir Godfrey Tallboys trilogy.

Norah Lofts, The Homecoming (1975), a family saga about the wife of a knight whose husband returns from the Crusades with the young woman who rescued him from slavery and is now pregnant with his child, and their children's generation; #2 in the Sir Godfrey Tallboys trilogy.

Norah Lofts, The Lonely Furrow (1976), about a knight's son in fifteenth-century England who has rejected the life of the aristocracy to become a simple farmer; #3 in the Sir Godfrey Tallboys trilogy - can be read as a stand-alone novel.


Karen Maitland, The Owl Killers (2009), a thriller about an English village terrorized by its overlords, when a group of nuns with a special gift for farming arrive and take in a young woman whose mysterious death leads to accusations of witchcraft.

Karen Maitland, The Gallows Curse (2011), about a servant girl who flees her village in 1210 after being drawn into a conspiracy to absolve the lord of the manor of his sins during the time when King John is excommunicate and England is under interdict.

A.M. Maughan, Harry of Monmouth (1956), about King Henry V.

Ralph Milton, Julian's Cell: The Earthy Story of Julian of Norwich (2002), about the fourteenth-century anchorite and mystic Julian of Norwich (an anchorite is a nun walled into a small cell attached to a church for the rest of her life).

Douglas Nicholas, Something Red (2012), historical fantasy about a thirteenth-century Irish healer and her troupe stalked by a supernatural being as they travel through the coldest winter of their lives.

Robert Nye, Falstaff (2001), a bawdy novel of medieval England narrated by the Shakespearean character Falstaff.

Anne O'Brien, The King's Concubine (2012), about Alice Perrers, the mistress of King Edward III.

Evan Ostryzniuk, Of Faith and Fidelity (2011), about an English orphan whose misadventures land him in a company of Catalonian crossbowmen on their way to fight in the 14th-century war between the supporters of the two claimants for the papacy.

Edith Pargeter, A Bloody Field by Shrewsbury (1972; also titled The Bloody Field in the U.S.), about Henry IV, the friendship between his son Hal and Harry "Hotspur" Percy, and the disputes leading up to the 1403 Battle of Shrewsbury near the Welsh border. Review

John Colin Penford, The Gascon (1984), about the love affair between Edward II and Piers Gaveston.

Maureen Peters, Isabella, the She-Wolf (1985), a novel narrated by Queen Isabella, the wife of Edward II.

Maureen Peters, My Philippa (1984), about Queen Philippa, the wife of Edward III; out of print and not readily available.

Jean Plaidy, The Queen from Provence (1979), about Eleanor of Provence, the wife of King Henry III of England; #6 in the Plantagenet series.

Jean Plaidy, Edward Longshanks (1970; also titled The Hammer of the Scots), about King Edward I of England; #7 in the Plantagenet series.

Jean Plaidy, The Follies of the King (1980), about Edward II, his favorites Piers Gaveston and Hugh Despenser, and his wife Isabella; #8 in the Plantagenet series.

Jean Plaidy, The Vow on the Heron (1980), about Edward III of England; #9 in the Plantagenet series.

Jean Plaidy, The Passage to Pontefract (1981), about Richard II, crowned King of England at the age of ten, and his uncle John of Gaunt, who served as regent; #10 in the Plantagenet series.

Jean Plaidy, The Star of Lancaster (1981), about the Lancaster kings Henry IV and Henry V; #11 in the Plantagenet series.

Jean Plaidy, Epitaph for Three Women (1981), about three notable women in fifteenth-century England and France; the final section is about Joan of Arc; #12 in the Plantagenet series.

Brandy Purdy, The Confession of Piers Gaveston (2007), about the love affair between King Edward II and Piers Gaveston; self-published.

Charles Reade, The Cloister and the Hearth (1861), a tragic love story about the parents of Erasmus, Margaret and Gerard Brandt, who were separated when Gerard, traveling in Europe, was falsely informed his wife Margaret was dead.

Margaret Redfern, Flint (2009), about two Welsh brothers, one a mute with skills that seem uncanny to the English, forced into service as ditch-diggers during the building of King Edward I's castle at Flint. Review

Mildred Gladys Richings, Men Loved Darkness: A Romance of Chivalry (1935), a novel based on the theory that Edward II survived his overthrow and lived into the reign of his son; out of print and not readily available.

Judith Merkle Riley, A Vision of Light (1988), about a woman in fourteenth-century England; #1 in the Margaret of Ashbury series.

Judith Merkle Riley, In Pursuit of the Green Lion (1990), about a woman in fourteenth-century England; #2 in the Margaret of Ashbury series.

Judith Merkle Riley, The Water Devil (1992), about a woman in fourteenth-century England; #3 in the Margaret of Ashbury series.

Martha Rofheart, Fortune Made His Sword (1972; titled Cry "God for Harry" in the U.K.), about King Henry V.

Anya Seton, Katherine (1954), about Katherine Swynford, the mistress of John of Gaunt and ancestress of the Plantagenet kings of England. Review

Eve Trevaskis, The Lord of Misrule (1972), a novel about Piers Gaveston, the favorite of Edward II. Review at Reading the Past

Eve Trevaskis, King's Wake (1977), a novel based on the theory that Edward II survived his overthrow and lived into the reign of his son; out of print and not readily available.

Brenda Rickman Vantrease, The Illuminator (2005), about a woman in fourteenth-century England during the time of John Wycliff and the controversy over his English translation of the Bible.

Brenda Rickman Vantrease, The Mercy Seller (2007), about a fifteenth-century priest uncomfortable with his role as a seller of indulgences and a young Lollard woman trained as a copyist whose lives intersect in France; sequel to The Illuminator.

Philippa Wiat, Queen-Gold (1985), about Edward III and his wife Philippa.

Penelope Wilcock, The Hawk and the Dove (2000), about the stories a woman tells her teenaged daughter about a fourteenth-century relative who was a Benedictine abbot; Christian message; a trilogy published in a single volume.

Jay Williams, The Good Yeoman (1956), a novel about Robin Hood set during the reign of Edward II.

Sandra Wilson, Alice (1976), about a woman who becomes the mistress of Piers Gaveston.


Mysteries and Thrillers: 14th-15th Century British Isles

Some exceptionally prolific mystery novelists have set series in fourteenth-century England. Series mysteries by Paul Doherty (who has also used the pen names P.C. Doherty and Paul Harding, among others), Margaret Frazer, Susanna Gregory, Michael Jecks, Jay Margrave, Pat McIntosh, Candace Robb, Mel Starr, and Jeri Westerson appear in this section, as well as stand-alone mysteries by Tim Hodkinson, Sheri Holman and Barry Unsworth. Click on the author's name above to jump to that author's books.


Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


P.C. Doherty, Satan in St.Mary's (1986), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #1 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series.

P.C. Doherty, The Crown in Darkness (1988), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #2 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, Spy in Chancery (1988), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #3 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, Angel of Death (1989), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #4 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, Prince of Darkness (1992), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #5 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series.

P.C. Doherty, Murder Wears a Cowl (1992), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #6 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series.

P.C. Doherty, The Assassin in the Greenwood (1993), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #7 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, The Song of a Dark Angel (1994), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #8 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series.

P.C. Doherty, Satan's Fire (1995), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #9 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, The Devil's Hunt (1996), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #10 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, The Demon Archer (1999), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #11 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series.

P.C. Doherty, The Treason of the Ghosts (2000), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #12 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, Corpse Candle (2001), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #13 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, The Magician's Death (2004), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #14 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, The Waxman Murders (2006), about a clerk for King Edward I who solves mysteries; set in the late thirteenth century; #15 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series

P.C. Doherty, Nightshade (2008), about an official in the court of King Edward I who is sent on a mission to Essex, where he finds a serial killer spreading terror; #16 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series.

Paul Doherty, The Mysterium (2010), about a clerk for King Edward I in 1304 who must investigate the murder of a man in sanctuary by a serial killer; #17 in the Hugh Corbett mystery series.


Paul Doherty (under the pen name of Paul Harding), The Nightingale Gallery (1991), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #1 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series.

Paul Doherty (under the pen name of Paul Harding), The House of the Red Slayer (1992), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #2 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series.

Paul Doherty (under the pen name of Paul Harding), Murder Most Holy (1992), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #3 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series

Paul Doherty (under the pen name of Paul Harding), The Anger of God (1993), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #4 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series

Paul Doherty (under the pen name of Paul Harding), By Murder's Bright Light (1994), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #5 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series

Paul Doherty (under the pen name of Paul Harding), The House of Crows (1995), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #6 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series

Paul Doherty (under the pen name of Paul Harding), The Assassin's Riddle (1996), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #7 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series.

Paul Doherty, The Devil's Domain (1998), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #8 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series.

Paul Doherty, The Field of Blood (1999), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #9 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series

Paul Doherty, The House of Shadows (2003), a friar in fourteenth-century London solves mysteries; #10 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series

Paul Doherty, Bloodstone (2011), about a friar who must solve the mystery of a London merchant found dead in a locked room amid rumors that the man, a former knight, was cursed for taking a sacred relic from a French abbey; #11 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series.

Paul Doherty, The Straw Men (2012), about a friar who must investigate the beheading murder of two men during a mystery play by John of Gaunt's pesonal troupe; #12 in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series.


P.C. (Paul) Doherty, An Ancient Evil (1993), Chaucer's medieval pilgrims from the Canterbury Tales tell murder mystery stories; #1 in the Canterbury Tales of Mystery and Murder series.

P.C. (Paul) Doherty, A Tapestry of Murders (1994), Chaucer's medieval pilgrims from the Canterbury Tales tell murder mystery stories; #2 in the Canterbury Tales of Mystery and Murder series.

P.C. (Paul) Doherty, A Tournament of Murders (1995), Chaucer's medieval pilgrims from the Canterbury Tales tell murder mystery stories; #3 in the Canterbury Tales of Mystery and Murder series

Paul Doherty, Ghostly Murders (1997), Chaucer's medieval pilgrims from the Canterbury Tales tell murder mystery stories; #4 in the Canterbury Tales of Mystery and Murder series

Paul Doherty, The Hangman's Hymn (2001), Chaucer's medieval pilgrims from the Canterbury Tales tell murder mystery stories; #5 in the Canterbury Tales of Mystery and Murder series.

Paul Doherty, A Haunt of Murder (2002), Chaucer's medieval pilgrims from the Canterbury Tales tell murder mystery stories; #6 in the Canterbury Tales of Mystery and Murder series.


Paul Doherty, The Cup of Ghosts (2005), about a lady in the service of Queen Isabella of England who tries to find out who murdered a knight during King Edward II's coronation; #1 in the Mathilde of Westminster series.

Paul Doherty, The Poison Maiden (2007), about a lady in the service of Queen Isabella of England who tries to discover the identity of a dangerous spy for King Philip of France in King Edward II's English court; #2 in the Mathilde of Westminster series.

Paul Doherty, The Darkening Glass (2009), about a lady in the service of Queen Isabella of England who must find a murderer as threats to Edward II's rule arise from Scotland as well as within England in 1312; #3 in the Mathilde of Westminster series.


P.C. Doherty, The Whyte Harte, about the mysteries surrounding the death of King Richard II in the fifteenth century; #1 in the Matthew Jankyn mystery series

P.C. Doherty, The Serpent Amongst the Lilies (1990), about Joan of Arc and the mysteries surrounding her from the English perspective; #2 in the Matthew Jankyn mystery series.

P.C. Doherty, The Death of a King (1985), set in the fourteenth century, a stand-alone mystery novel about an investigation by Edward III into whether Edward II was murdered.


Margaret Frazer, The Novice's Tale (1992), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #1 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Servant's Tale (1993), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #2 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Outlaw's Tale (1994), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #3 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Bishop's Tale (1994), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #4 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Boy's Tale (1995), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #5 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Murderer's Tale (1996), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #6 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Prioress' Tale (1997), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #7 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Maiden's Tale (1998), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #8 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Reeve's Tale (1999), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #9 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Squire's Tale (2000), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #10 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Clerk's Tale (2002), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #11 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Bastard's Tale (2003), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #12 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Hunter's Tale (2004), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #13 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Widow's Tale (2005), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #14 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Sempster's Tale (2006), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #15 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Traitor's Tale (2007), a Benedictine nun in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #16 in the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, The Apostate's Tale (2008), murder threatens in the turmoil stirred up by the return of a former nun and her illegitimate child; #17 in the Dame Frevisse mystery series.

Margaret Frazer, A Play of Isaac (2004), a traveling player in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #1 in the Joliffe Player Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, A Play of Dux Moraud (2005), a traveling player in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #2 in the Joliffe Player Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, A Play of Knaves (2006), a traveling player in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #3 in the Joliffe Player Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, A Play of Lords (2007), a traveling player in fifteenth-century England solves mysteries; #4 in the Joliffe Player Mysteries series.

Margaret Frazer, A Play of Treachery (2009), a traveling player in fifteenth-century England encounters murder when he goes to France to train as a spy in the household of a widowed duchess; #5 in the Joliffe Players mystery series.

Margaret Frazer, A Play of Piety (2010), a traveling player in fifteenth-century England must take work in a hospital where a difficult patient insists someone is trying to murder her; #6 in the Joliffe Players mystery series.

Margaret Frazer, A Play of Heresy (2011), about a traveling player who investigates the case of a missing person in Coventry, where a sect of heretics are working against the Church; #7 in the Joliffe Players mystery series.


C.L. Grace, A Shrine of Murders (1993), about a woman physician who investigates a series of murders of pilgrims to Canterbury Cathedral in 1471, which seem related to Chaucer's unpublished series of tales; #1 in the Kathryn Swinbrooke series. C.L. Grace is a pen name for Paul Doherty.

C.L. Grace, The Eye of God (1994), about a woman physician commissioned by King Edward IV to recover a valuable sapphire in the hands of Lancastrian rebels; #2 in the Kathryn Swinbrooke series. C.L. Grace is a pen name for Paul Doherty.

C.L. Grace, The Merchant of Death (1995), about a woman physician charged with finding the murderer of a king's tax collector and recovering the stolen taxes; #3 in the Kathryn Swinbrooke series. C.L. Grace is a pen name for Paul Doherty.

C.L. Grace, The Book of Shadows (1996), about a woman physician directed by the Queen to identify the murderer of a practitioner of the dark arts and recover his diary which contains secrets about the Queen; #4 in the Kathryn Swinbrooke series. C.L. Grace is a pen name for Paul Doherty.

C.L. Grace, Saintly Murders (2001), about a woman physician charged with investigating who killed a spy for the king and exposing a likely traitor on the king's council; #5 in the Kathryn Swinbrooke series. C.L. Grace is a pen name for Paul Doherty.

C.L. Grace, A Maze of Murders (2002), about a woman physician investigating the murder of a prominent nobleman in Canterbury; #6 in the Kathryn Swinbrooke series. C.L. Grace is a pen name for Paul Doherty.

C.L. Grace, A Feast of Poisons (2004), about a woman physician visiting Walmer on state business who investigates the mysterious poisoning deaths of a blacksmith and his wife; #7 in the Kathryn Swinbrooke series. C.L. Grace is a pen name for Paul Doherty.


Susanna Gregory, A Plague on Both Your Houses (1996), about a physician in 1348 Cambridge who investigates a mysterious death at the fledgling university as plague threatens the town; #1 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, An Unholy Alliance (1996), a physician in 1350 Cambridge who is struggling to train new physicians after the plague has decimated the population, when the murder of a friar plunges him into an investigation of a mysterious sect who may be seeking to overthrow the established religion; #2 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, A Bone of Contention (1997), a physician in 1392 Cambridge investigates the connections between a discovery of old bones and the death of a college student; #3 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, A Deadly Brew (1998), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates murder amid increasing tensions between the college, Church and town; #4 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, A Wicked Deed (1999), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates the death of a scholarly priest when they travel to Suffolk; #5 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, A Masterly Murder (2000), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates the death of an unpopular new Master of the fledgling university; #6 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, An Order for Death (2001), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates murder amid a theological controversy; #7 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, A Summer of Discontent (2002), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates a series of murders when he travels to Ely to visit its library; #8 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, A Killer in Winter (2003), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates the murder of the husband of the woman he once loved; #9 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, The Hand of Justice (2004), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates two deaths after the return of a pair of pardoned but unrepentent murderers; #10 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, The Mark of a Murderer (2005), a fourteenth-century physician investigates murders in Cambridge following a riot in Oxford; #11 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, The Tarnished Chalice (2006), a physician from fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates a murder in Lincoln that may be connected to a relic with a bloody past; #12 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, To Kill or Cure (2007), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge finds himself in danger when a rival physician arrives in town with a practice involving magic; #13 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, The Devil's Disciples (2008), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates murders that appear to be the work of a mysterious sorcerer; #14 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, A Vein of Deceit (2009), a physician in fourteenth-century Cambridge investigates a web of financial fraud; #15 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, The Killer of Pilgrims (2010), about a physician who must investigate the death of a wealthy man amid a rash of increasingly dangerous practical jokes; #16 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, Mystery in the Minster (2011), about a physician sent with a deputation to Cambridge to investigate a rival claim to a legacy and discovers a series of unexplained deaths; #17 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.

Susanna Gregory, Murder by the Book (2012), about a physician who must investigate a murder shortly before Cambridge University's new library is to open; #18 in the Chronicles of Matthew Bartholomew series.


Tim Hodkinson, Lions of the Grail (2011), a thriller about a Templar Knight from Ireland who is condemned as a heretic but offered a reprieve if he agrees to work as a spy for King Edward of England; self-published.

Sheri Holman, A Stolen Tongue (1997), a mystery novel about a fifteenth-century religious pilgrimage.

Bruce Holsinger, A Burnable Book (2014), a thriller about a poet asked by Geoffrey Chaucer to find the manuscript of a book predicting the assassination of King Richard II.


Michael Jecks, The Last Templar (1995), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate a rash of deaths by burning; #1 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Merchant's Partner (1995), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate the murder of a midwife and healer suspected of being a witch; #2 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, A Moorland Hanging (1996), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate the death of a serf; #3 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Crediton Killings (1997), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate the murders that follow the arrival of a band of mercenaries; #4 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Abbot's Gibbet (1998), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate a murder during the Tavistock Fair; #5 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Leper's Return (1998), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate the murder of a goldsmith; #6 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, Squire Throwleigh's Heir (1999), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate the death of a squire and then his five-year-old heir in suspiciously rapid succession; #7 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, Belladonna at Belstone (1999), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate a murder in a convent; #8 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Traitor of St. Giles (2000), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate the mysterious deaths of a knight, his dog, and a felon; #9 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Boy-Bishop's Glovemaker (2000), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate murders at Christmastime; #10 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Tournament of Blood (2001), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate a series of murders during a tournament; #11 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Sticklepath Strangler (2001), two noblemen investigate a series of murders after two girls find a skull while they are playing; #12 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Devil's Acolyte (2002), two noblemen investigate a death and theft that appear to follow the pattern of a legend; #13 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Mad Monk of Gidleigh (2002), two noblemen investigate the murder of a woman who was not the simple miller's daughter she appeared to be; #14 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Templar's Penance (2003), two noblemen on pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela are asked to help solve the murder of a young girl; #15 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Outlaws of Ennor (2004), a nobleman returning from pilgrimage is asked to investigate a murder on the islands of Ennor; #16 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Tolls of Death (2004), two noblemen traveling through Cornwall on their way home from pilgrimage are asked to investigate the murder of a woman and her two sons; #17 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Chapel of Bones (2004), two noblemen investigate a series of deaths at Exeter Cathedral; #18 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Butcher of St. Peter's (2005), two noblemen try to find and stop a serial killer in Exeter; #19 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, A Friar's Bloodfeud (2006), two noblemen investigate a family's murder; #20 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Death Ship of Dartmouth (2006), two noblemen investigate a pirate attack that may be more sinister than it seems; #21 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Malice of Unnatural Death (2007), two noblemen in service to King Edward II investigate the killing of a royal messenger; #22 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, Dispensation of Death (2007), two noblemen in service to King Edward II are assigned to find out who murdered a lady-in-waiting and a man whose body was found behind the throne; #23 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Templar, the Queen and Her Lover (2008), two noblemen in fourteenth-century Devon investigate murders; #24 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The Prophecy of Death (2008), two noblemen in service to King Edward II return from France in 1325 to find themselves in the midst of deadly court intrigues; #25 in the Baldwin de Furnshill mystery series.

Michael Jecks, The King of Thieves (2008), about two former Templar Knights who travel to France with Prince Edward and must root out a conspiracy of murder that threatens the future of England; #26 in the Baldwin de Furnshill series.

Michael Jecks, No Law in the Land (2009), about two former Templar Knights who return to their native Devon after being dismissed from the service of Edward II and discover it is being plagued by outlaws; #27 in the Baldwin de Furnshill series.

Michael Jecks, The Bishop Must Die (2009), about two former Templar Knights who must find out who is threatening the life of the Treasurer of England as a French invasion looms; #28 in the Baldwin de Furnshill series.

Michael Jecks, The Oath (2010), about two former Templar Knights who must investigate a killing spree which begins with the murder of an entire family in 1326 as conflict between King Edward II and Queen Isabella tears the country apart; #29 in the Baldwin de Furnshill series.

Michael Jecks, King’s Gold (2011), about two former Templar Knights threatened by a conspiracy in 1326 while they guard the deposed King Edward II on the orders of Sir Roger Mortimer, Queen Isabella's lover; #30 in the Baldwin de Furnshill series.

Michael Jecks, City of Fiends (2012), about a nobleman who investigates the murder of a young maid in Exeter after he travels there to report the escape of the deposed Edward II; #31 in the Baldwin de Furnshill series.


Jay Margrave, The Gawain Quest (2007), about a medieval hitman tormented by his conscience after John of Gaunt sends him on a mission to kill the author of Gawain and the Green Knight, believed to contain seditious material against King Richard II; #1 in the Priedeux mystery series.

Jay Margrave, Luther's Ambassadors (2008), about a servant and mentor to Anne Boleyn who assists her in pursuing her goal of reforming the Catholic Church by becoming Henry VIII's queen; #2 in the Priedeux mystery series.


Pat McIntosh, The Harper's Quine (2004), about an aspiring lawyer in Glasgow whose parents expect him to become a priest, who stumbles across the corpse of a woman and is drawn to investigate her murder; #1 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, The Nicholas Feast (2005), about a young Scottish lawyer who returns to his old university for a feast celebration and finds a corpse in the coalhouse; #2 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, The Merchant's Mark (2006), about a young Scottish lawyer whose merchant friend discovers a severed head instead of the shipment of books he was expecting; #3 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, St. Mungo's Robin (2006), about a Scottish lawyer who investigates a murder in an almshouse; #4 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, The Rough Collier (2008), about a young lawyer accused of murdering a man by witchcraft; #5 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, The Stolen Voice (2009), about a lawyer sent to a remote part of Scotland to investigate the case of a man said to have been stolen away by the fairies as a child and only recently returned; #6 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, A Pig of Cold Poison (2010), about a Scottish archbishop's questioner who must investigate a case of murder by poisoning during an All Hallow's Eve mummer's play in 15th-century Glasgow; #7 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, The Counterfeit Madam (2011), about a Scottish archbishop's questioner who is investigating a case of counterfeiting when the madam of a bawdy house dies under suspicious circumstances; #8 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, The Fourth Crow (2012), about a Scottish archbishop's questioner who must find out who killed a young woman tied to a cross overnight outside the cathedral to be cured of madness; #9 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.

Pat McIntosh, The King's Corrodian (2013), about about a Scottish archbishop's questioner investigating the disappearance of a blackmailer, said to have been carried off by the Devil; #10 in the Gil Cunningham mystery series.


Candace Robb, The Apothecary Rose (1993), about a formerly expert archer who found a new profession as an unraveler of mysteries after losing the sight of one eye, and is dispatched in December 1363 to find out why a master apothecary's medicines are killing people; #1 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, The Lady Chapel (1994), about a one-eyed former archer in 1363 York who is plunged into danger when he investigates a series of killings that begin after the Corpus Christi celebrations; #2 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, The Nun's Tale (1995), in 1365, aided by his pregnant wife, a former archer investigates a nun's claim to be a resurrected fever victim; #3 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, The King's Bishop (1996), a former archer's diplomatic mission in 1367 to powerful abbots on behalf of King Edward III is disrupted by murder; #4 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, The Riddle of St. Leonard's (1997), amid a 1369 plague epidemic, a former archer investigates a series of suspicious deaths at the hospital in York; #5 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, A Gift of Sanctuary (1998), in 1370, amid fears of a French invasion, a former archer accompanies Geoffrey Chaucer on a covert mission to Wales, where their mission is complicated by a series of murders; #6 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, A Spy for the Redeemer (2002), in 1370, a former archer's attempt to return from Wales is complicated by a case of murder, the outbreak of war, and his conflicted feelings about his Welsh homeland; #7 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, The Cross-Legged Knight (2002), in 1371, a former archer investigates the death of a midwife in a fire that may have been deliberately set; #8 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, The Guilt of Innocents (2007), in 1372 York, a former archer investigates the drowning death of a man who turned out to have been poisoned; #9 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, A Vigil of Spies (2008), as an archbishop lies dying in 1373, a former archer must find out who murdered a royal servant and made off with a set of important documents; #10 in the Owen Archer mystery series.

Candace Robb, A Trust Betrayed (2000), in the late thirteenth century, the wife of a man who has been missing for a year sets out for Edinburgh, Scotland, to find out what has happened to him, after the body of his murdered factor is brought home from there; #1 in the Margaret Kerr mystery series.

Candace Robb, The Fire in the Flint (2003), in 1297, when a woman's long-missing husband returns to her, she begins to suspect he is using her as cover for a dangerous mission involving their divided allegiances to Scotland and England; #2 in the Margaret Kerr mystery series.

Candace Robb, A Cruel Courtship (2004), on the eve of the Battle of Stirling Bridge, a woman takes on a difficult mission for a relation of the deposed Scottish king, and then suspects he may be involved in her husband's murder; #3 in the Margaret Kerr mystery series.


Mel Starr, The Unquiet Bones (2008), about a young surgeon in Oxford in 1363 who must investigate a case of murder after human bones are discovered on a nobleman's estate; #1 in the Hugh de Singleton Surgeon Chronicles series. Review

Mel Starr, A Corpse at St. Andrew's Chapel (2009), about a young surgeon in Oxford; #2 in the Hugh de Singleton Surgeon Chronicles series.

Mel Starr, A Trail of Ink (2010), about a young surgeon in Oxford in 1363 who must investigate a case of murder after human bones are discovered on a nobleman's estate; #3 in the Hugh de Singleton Surgeon Chronicles series.


Barry Unsworth, Morality Play (1996), a troupe of players in fourteenth-century England try to solve a murder mystery.


Jeri Westerson, Veil of Lies (2008), about a knight disgraced for plotting against Richard II who, after being hired to learn what a London merchant's wife is up to, discovers his client's dead body when he goes to make his report; #1 in the Crispin Guest mystery series. Review

Jeri Westerson, Serpent in the Thorns (2009), about a former knight who must clear himself of a murder charge when a French courier's dead body is found in a tavern girl's room; #2 in the Crispin Guest mystery series. Review or Author Interview

Jeri Westerson, The Demon's Parchment (2010), about a former knight who happens upon the body of a murdered child which searching for documents stolen from his Jewish client; #3 in the Crispin Guest mystery series. Review or Author Interview

Jeri Westerson, Troubled Bones (2011), about a former knight who in 1385 travels to Canterbury where he must investigate the murder of a prioress on pilgrimage to Becket's tomb; #4 in the Crispin Guest mystery series.

Jeri Westerson, Blood Lance (2012), about a former knight who tries to rescue a man who plunges from a bridge and, after failing, learns the man promised to provide someone with a miraculous spear; #5 in the Crispin Guest mystery series.

Jeri Westerson, Shadow of the Alchemist (2013), about a former knight who investigates the kidnapping of Nicholas Flamel's wife and apprentice; #6 in the Crispin Guest mystery series.




The Hundred Years' War

In the late 1330s, Edward III claimed the French throne, beginning the Hundred Years' War between England and France. His son (known as Edward the Black Prince because of the black ground on his coat of arms) led the English troops in many of the early campaigns of this war. In 1415, Henry V of England won the Battle of Agincourt, largely because of the skills of his Welsh and English longbowmen. In 1429, the tides of fortune turned to favor the French, largely due to the nationalistic fervor and more aggressive campaign tactics inspired by Joan of Arc. Joan of Arc was a French teenager who, believing herself to be guided by divine visions, took a leadership role in the French military efforts to recapture territory conquered by the English. Though she was captured and burned at the stake as a heretic in 1431, the English never regained their previous momentum in the war, and the French finally defeated them in 1453.

For an article about Joan of Arc with a list of nonfiction books and novels about her, see Green World/Stone World: The Two Worlds of Joan of Arc.


Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


E. C. Ambrose, Elisha Barber (2013), historical fantasy about a fourteenth-century barber-surgeon who discovers he has magical abilities; #1 in the forthcoming Dark Apostle series.

Ann Benson, Thief of Souls (2002), about two strangely linked crime waves, one in modern Los Angeles, the other in medieval France involving Gilles de Rais.

Joy Bounds, Far From Home (2012), about Joan of Arc as narrated by her mother; self-published.

Christian Cameron, The Ill-Made Knight (2013), about a man who works his way up from cook's boy to mercenary soldier during the Hundred Years' War. Review


Bernard Cornwell, Harlequin (2000; titled The Archer's Tale in the U.S.), about an Englishman from Dorset who becomes a soldier and fights in France during the Hundred Years War; #1 in the Grail Quest series.

Bernard Cornwell, Vagabond (2002), about an English soldier during the Hundred Years War who returns to England following a hint that the Holy Grail may actually exist, and becomes involved in a war with the Scots; #2 in the Grail Quest series.

Bernard Cornwell, Heretic (2003), about an English soldier during and after the fall of Calais in the Hundred Years War; #3 in the Grail Quest series.

Bernard Cornwell, Azincourt (2008; titled Agincourt in the U.S.), about an archer in the army of King Henry V of England during the campaign that led to the victory at Agincourt (spelled Azincourt by the French); #4 in the Grail Quest series, but stands alone. Review

Bernard Cornwell, 1356 (2012), about an English soldier who fights in the Battle of Poitiers on September 19, 1356, leading to an unlikely victory against heavy odds; #5 in the Grail Quest series, but stands alone.


Kimberly Cutter, The Maid (2011), about Joan of Arc.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company (1891), about English soldiers fighting in France during the Hundred Years War.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Nigel (1906), about English soldiers fighting in France during the Hundred Years War; a prequel to The White Company.

David Gilman, Master of War (2013), about an archer in Edward III's army during the Hundred Years' War; #1 in a planned series.

Rosemary Hawley Jarman, St. Crispin's Day: The Glory of Agincourt (1979), about the young King Henry V and his campaign against the French that led to his victory at Agincourt in 1415.

Thomas Keneally, Blood Red, Sister Rose (1974), a literary novel about Joan of Arc from the time she began hearing voices until her capture by the Burgundians. Review

Deryn Lake, The King's Women (2006), about Charles VII of France, the king helped to his throne by Joan of Arc.

Rosanne Lortz, I Serve: A Novel of the Black Prince (2009), about Sir John Potenhale, a knight in the service of Edward, the Black Prince, during the Hundred Years' War; self-published.

Robert Nye, The Life and Death of My Lord Gilles de Rais (1990), about the murderer of young boys who fought alongside Joan of Arc.

Maureen Peters, Joan of the Lilies (1969), a short biographical novel about Joan of Arc.

Lawrence Schoonover, The Burnished Blade (1948), about an armourer's apprentice in France near the end of the Hundred Years War; the novel opens as he witnesses the execution of Joan of Arc.

Mark Twain, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, by the Sieur Louis de Conte (1895; also published under the title Joan of Arc), a novel about Joan of Arc narrated by her page.


The Black Plague

From the mid-fourteenth century, on, Europe was stricken by a series of terrifying visitations from the Black Plague, which decimated the population. The epidemic began in the port cities carried, we now know, by rats harboring fleas whose bites spread the disease, which was later spread further by contact between infected people. Some, believing the plague to a punishment sent by God, adopted extreme penitent practices or began persecuting Jews. Others shed moral inhibitions and lived for the moment. The decline in population made workers scarce, so that serfs began to demand freedom and free workers better wages and working conditions.


Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Ann Benson, Plague Tales (1997), about an archaeologist in the near future who inadvertently starts a new plague epidemic and a medieval Jewish physician linked to the outbreak.

Ann Benson, The Burning Road (1999), about the plague in medieval France and a medical researcher in a near future time of runaway genetic engineering; #2 in the Plague Tales series.

Ann Benson, The Physician's Tale (2006), about a medical researcher in the near future and a medieval physician; #3 in the Plague Tales series.

Christopher Buehlman, Between Two Fires (2012), a horror story about a disgraced Norman knight who in 1348 come upon the lone survivor of a plague-stricken town, a girl who tells him she has spoken with angels and persuades him to accompany her to Avignon.

Linnea Heinrichs, The First Vial (2006), about a fourteenth-century noblewoman struggling to keep her castle and land during a plague epidemic.

Karen Maitland, Company of Liars: A Novel of the Plague (2008), about a group of fourteenth-century travelers trying to escape the plague and the truth about themselves. Review

Sylvia Townsend Warner, The Corner That Held Them (1948), about a community of Benedictine nuns in Norfolk during a fourteenth-century outbreak of the Black Plague.

Connie Willis, Doomsday Book (1992), a novel about a woman of the future who time-travels to plague-stricken England in the fourteenth century.


The English Peasants' Rebellion

As the Hundred Years' War dragged on, English monarchs levied higher taxes on poor workers in order to finance it, creating hardships for workers whose lives were already difficult. With the population reduced by plague, workers came to realize their labor was in higher demand, and they began to protest the harsh and degrading conditions under which they lived. In June 1381, after Parliament passed a law requiring wages to be reduced to the old rates, Wat Tyler led a group of rebels in a march on London. Their success in negotiating concessions was only temporary.


Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Prudence Andrew, The Constant Star (1964), about the English Peasants' Rebellion.

Philip Lindsay, The Golden Cage (1961), about Wat Tyler and the 1381 English Peasants' Rebellion.

Elizabeth Lord, Company of Rebels (2005), about a fourteenth-century blacksmith who leads a group of villagers to London to protest the oppressive poll tax and, ultimately, to join the English Peasants' Rebellion.

Philippa Wiat, The Hammer and the Sword (1992), about Wat Tyler, the leader of the 1381 English Peasants' Rebellion; U.K. publication, hard to find in the U.S.

Simone Zelitch, The Confession of Jack Straw (1991), about one of the leaders of the English Peasants' Revolt of 1381.


Scotland

King Edward I of England pursued numerous military campaigns against both Wales and Scotland, both of which were essentially under English control by the end of the thirteenth century. The Scottish knight William Wallace led an unsuccessful uprising against England and was captured and executed as a traitor by the English in 1305. Robert the Bruce, crowned King of Scotland in 1306, continued to fight against England and finally won a decisive military victory at Bannockburn in 1314. Edward I's ambitious grandson Edward III renewed the wars against Scotland as well as pursuing a claim to the throne of France which began the Hundred Years' War.


Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Darci Hannah, The Angel of Blythe Hall (2011), about a woman who returns to her family estate in Scotland during a time of warfare in the fifteenth century and is haunted by dreams of angels.

Geoffrey Humphrys, The Wild Knight (2008), about King James IV of Scotland, who came to the throne at age sixteen, became an effective national leader, but died in the disastrous Battle of Flodden Field; not readily available in the U.S.

Julianne Lee, Knight Tenebrae, historical romance/fantasy about a modern British reporter and an American Navy pilot and his wife stranded together in the fourteenth-century Scotland of Robert the Bruce, while an inhuman enemy schemes to destroy them and all mankind; #1 in the Tenebrae series.

Julianne Lee, Knight's Blood, historical romance/fantasy about a modern Navy pilot and his wife stranded in fourteenth-century Scotland, whose child has been kidnapped by the elfin king; #2 in the Tenebrae series.

Julianne Lee, Knight's Lady, historical romance/fantasy about a modern Navy pilot and his wife stranded in fourteenth-century Scotland, and separated when the wife is taken to the faerie country; #3 in the Tenebrae series.

Robert Low, The Lion Wakes (2011), about a nobleman whose family assigns him, as a political strategy, to join the rebellion of Robert the Bruce and William Wallace against England; #1 in the Kingdom series. Review

Robert Low, The Lion at Bay (2012), about William Wallace as he returns to Scotland after fleeing to France after his failed rebellion, and Robert the Bruce as he defers his goal of becoming king because of rivalry among the clans; #2 in the Kingdom series.

Allan Massie, The Hanging Tree (1990), about a fifteenth-century Scottish border family.

Elisabeth McNeill, Flodden Field (2008), about James IV of Scotland and the Battle of Flodden Field.

Jane Oliver, The Lion is Come (1951), about the Scottish king Robert the Bruce.

N. Gemini Sasson, The Crown in the Heather (2010), about the rivalry of Robert the Bruce and John Balliol for the throne of Scotland; #1 in the Bruce trilogy; self-published.

N. Gemini Sasson, Worth Dying For (2011), about the rise of Robert the Bruce; #2 in the Bruce trilogy; self-published.

Reay Tannahill, The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1985), set in fifteenth-century Scotland during the reign of King James I of Scotland.


Nigel Tranter, The Wallace (1975), about William Wallace, the medieval Scottish knight who led a revolt against England.

Nigel Tranter, The Islesman (2002), about Angus Og MacDonald, Prince of the Hebrides and much of the West Highlands of Scotland in the early fourteenth-century, the time of Robert the Bruce.

Nigel Tranter, The Steps to the Empty Throne (1969), about Robert the Bruce, who became King of the Scots in 1306; #1 in the Bruce trilogy.

Nigel Tranter, The Path of the Hero King (1970), about Robert the Bruce, who became King of the Scots in 1306; #2 in the Bruce trilogy.

Nigel Tranter, The Price of the King's Peace (1971), about Robert the Bruce, who became King of the Scots in 1306; #3 in the Bruce trilogy.

Nigel Tranter, Flowers of Chivalry (1987), about the struggle to preserve medieval Scotland's independence after the death of Robert the Bruce.

Nigel Tranter, Courting Favour (2000), about John of Moray, who served as a diplomat for King David of Scots in the fourteenth century and negotiated a peace treaty with England's John of Gaunt.

Nigel Tranter, Lords of Misrule (1976), about Jamie Douglas, the bastard son of a Scottish lord, and the turbulent rise of the Stewart family, who were descended from the daughter of Robert the Bruce; #1 in the Stewart trilogy. Review

Nigel Tranter, A Folly of Princes (1977), about the turbulent rise of the Stewart family, who were descended from the daughter of Robert the Bruce; #2 in the Stewart trilogy.

Nigel Tranter, The Captive Crown (1977), about the turbulent rise of the Stewart family, who were descended from the daughter of Robert the Bruce; #3 in the Stewart trilogy.

Nigel Tranter, The End of the Line (2000), about the unlikely fifteenth-century friendship between the Scottish Earl of Dunbar and King Henry IV of England.

Nigel Tranter, Lion Let Loose (1967), about the first James Stewart to be crowned King of Scots.

Nigel Tranter, The Lion's Whelp (1997), about King James II of Scots, who came to the throne at age seven in 1437 when his father was murdered.

Nigel Tranter, Black Douglas (1968), about the eighth Earl of Douglas.


Carol Umberger, Circle of Honor (2002), about the fourteenth-century Scottish hero Robert the Bruce; #1 in the Scottish Crown series; Christian message.

Laura Vosika, Blue Bells of Scotland (2009), about a modern man and a man of the fourteenth century who find themselves switching times, with the modern man sent back to Scotland shortly before the Battle of Bannockburn as the medieval Scot is sent to the 21st century; #1 in a planned trilogy; self-published.

Jack Whyte, Rebel (2010; titled The Forest Laird in Canada and the U.S.), about William Wallace, a Scottish leader who rebelled against England in the late thirteenth century; #1 in the Bravehearts/Guardians trilogy.

Robyn Young, Insurrection (2010), about Robert the Bruce of Scotland and Edward I of England; #1 in a planned series.


The Continent and Mediterranean, 14th-15th Centuries

This section includes novels set in France, Germany, Flanders and the Low Countries, Italy, Spain, Hungary and Eastern Europe, and even a fictional island in the Mediterranean Sea.

Jump to Mysteries

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Deborah Alcock, Crushed yet Conquering: A Story of Constance and Bohemia in the Days of John Huss (1891; also titled A Torch to Bohemia), about two brothers who become followers of the religious reformer Jan Hus (anglicized to John Huss) during his trial and execution, and then help spread his reforms in Bohemia in the face of persecution.

Jeannette Angell, The Crown and the Kingdom (2010), about the French King Philippe IV and Pope Clement V, who moved the Papal See to Avignon; self-published; available as an e-book only.

Radwa Ashour, Granada (1994-1995 in the original Arabic as a trilogy; English translation 2003), about a Muslim bookbinder and his family in Granada after 1492 and the end of Arabic rule in Moorish Spain.

Michael Augustyn, Vlad Dracula: The Dragon Prince (1995), a biographical novel about Vlad Dracula, a fifteenth-century prince of Wallachia (once part of Hungary, now in Romania); self-published.

Honoré de Balzac, The Exiles (1831), about a man living near the cathedral Notre-Dame de Paris in the early fourteenth century who takes in two frightening guests who appear to him to be practicing sorcery.

Lisa T. Bergren, The Begotten (2006), a fantasy thriller set in 1339 Italy about a lost letter of St. Paul and a group of Christians with unusual spiritual gifts who come together, according to the prediction in the letter, to fight Satan's power during the Inquisition; #1 in the Gifted trilogy.

Lisa T. Bergren, The Betrayed (2007), a fantasy thriller set in fourteenth-century Italy about a lost letter of St. Paul and a group of Christians with unusual spiritual gifts who come together, according to the prediction in the letter, to fight Satan's power during the Inquisition; #2 in the Gifted trilogy.

Lisa T. Bergren, The Blessed (2008), a fantasy thriller set in fourteenth-century Italy about a lost letter of St. Paul and a group of Christians with unusual spiritual gifts who come together, according to the prediction in the letter, to fight Satan's power during the Inquisition; #3 in the Gifted trilogy.

David Blixt, Master of Verona (2007), about Dante’s 17-year-old son and the Italian city of Verona in 1314, around the time of Romeo and Juliet. Review

Rachel Caine, Prince of Shadows (2014), a retelling of the Romeo and Juliet story.

Tracy Chevalier, The Lady and the Unicorn (2004), a novel set in medieval France that imagines how the fifteenth-century "Lady and the Unicorn" tapestries were created.

Hendrik Conscience, The Lion of Flanders (1838), a romantic nineteenth-century novel about Robert of Bethune, who ruled Flanders during the early fourteenth century and later became a symbol of Flemish nationalism.

Thomas B. Costain, The Moneyman (1947), set in fifteenth-century France.

Sharon Cramer, The Execution (2012), about a priest who hears the confessions of those about to be executed in fourteenth-century France; self-published.

John D. Cressler, Emeralds of the Alhambra (2013), about a Christian knight and a female Sufi mystic in fourteenth-century Granada.

Michael Crichton, Timeline (1999), about a group of historians who travel back in time to the year 1357 in France.

Matt Cutugno, In Dracula's Time (2011), about a fifteenth-century biography of Vlad the Impaler which became the inspiration for Bram Stoker's novel Dracula.

Andrew Davidson, The Gargoyle (2008), about a modern man severely injured in a car wreck who is visited in the hospital by a mysterious woman claiming to have healed him before when she was a nun in fourteenth-century Germany. Review

Grant de Graf, Cavalier's Call (2010), about a Portuguese prince on the eve of the Age of Discovery; self-published, available in ebook format only.


Maurice Druon, The Iron King (1955; also titled The Ardent Infidels), about a French nobleman in the time of King Philippe IV (1285-1314) who believes his aunt has cheated him of his inheritance; #1 in the Accursed Kings series.

Maurice Druon, The Strangled Queen (1955), about a French nobleman in the time of King Louis X, and his schemes to reclaim the inheritance he believes his aunt cheated him of; #2 in the Accursed Kings series.

Maurice Druon, The Poisoned Crown (1957), about the last months of the reign of King Louis X; #3 in the Accursed Kings series.

Maurice Druon, The Royal Succession (1958), about the struggle for the succession after the death of King Louis X; #4 in the Accursed Kings series.

Maurice Druon, The She-Wolf of France (1960), about Queen Isabella of France and her love affair with the English nobleman Roger Mortimer during his exile in France; #5 in the Accursed Kings series.

Maurice Druon, The Lily and the Lion (1960), about King Edward III of England, King Philippe of France, and their competing claims to the throne of France, which led to the Hundred Years' War; #6 in the Accursed Kings series.

Maurice Druon, When a King Loses France (1977), about the early years of the Hundred Years' War, which were disastrous for France; #7 and final in the Accursed Kings series.


Ellen Ekstrom, The Legacy (2004), about a knight in fourteenth-century Tuscany who must fight both the church and his own family to retain his inheritance.

Lina Ellina, The Venetian (2012), about a present-day Venetian searching for his ancestor on Cyprus, and about his ancestor's love affair with a low-born woman in 1467. Review

Ildefonso Falcones, Cathedral of the Sea (English translation 2008), about a Spanish serf and the rise in his fortunes during the building of the Church of Santa Maria in fourteenth-century Barcelona.

Lion Feuchtwanger, The Ugly Duchess (1923), about Margarete Maultasch, the last Countess of independent Tyrol in the fourteenth century.

Anne Fortier, Juliet (2010), about two young women, one a modern American, the other her mysterious possible ancestor in fourteenth-century Italy who inspired Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

Stephen Gaspar, The Templar and the True Cross (2012), about a former Templar knight who returns to France and is asked to investigate a possible plot against King Philip IV that involves the theft of a sacred relic; self-published.


Jon Courtenay Grimwood, The Fallen Blade (2011), historical fantasy set in an alternative fifteenth-century Venice ruled by Marco Polo's descendants who employ vampire assassins; #1 in the Assassini trilogy.

Jon Courtenay Grimwood, The Outcast Blade (2012), historical fantasy set in an alternative fifteenth-century Venice ruled by Marco Polo's descendants who employ vampire assassins; #2 in the Assassini trilogy.

Jon Courtenay Grimwood, The Exiled Blade (2013), historical fantasy set in an alternative fifteenth-century Venice ruled by Marco Polo's descendants who employ vampire assassins; #3 in the Assassini trilogy.


Hella S. Haasse, In a Dark Wood Wandering (1949; English translation 1989), about the fifteenth-century French King Charles VI.

Titania Hardie, The House of the Wind (2012), about a present-day San Francisco woman who stays at a villa in Tuscany, and about the shy young woman who lived in the same villa in the fourteenth century.

Hermann Hesse, Narcissus and Goldmund (1930), a literary novel about a novice monk and an artist who become friends in medieval Germany.

Cecelia Holland, Rakossy (1966), set in sixteenth-century Hungary during the wars with the Turks

Cecelia Holland, The Lords of Vaumartin (1988), about an orphaned nobleman in fourteenth-century Paris. Review

C.C. Humphreys, Vlad: The Last Confession (2009), about a small group of men summoned with messages and fragments of the sword of Vlad Dracula, with the prospect of reforming his Order of the Dragon; historical fantasy based on the story of the historical Count Vlad of Wallachia.

Jeanne Kalogridis, The Burning Times (2001), about a clairvoyant midwife caught up in the Inquisition in fourteenth-century France.

Mitchell Kaplan, By Fire, By Water (2010), about Luis de Santángel, a Jewish convert to Christianity who served as finance minister to Spain's King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella as the power of the Inquisition grew. Review

Stephen Leigh, Immortal Muse (2014), historical fantasy about a French alchemist and his wife who in 1352 drink an elixir that makes them immortal, after which they part, travel the world and meet such historical artists as Bernini, Vivaldi, William Blake and Gustav Klimt, before ending up together again in present-day New York.

Geraldine McCaughrean, Vainglory (1991), about an aristocratic French family's obsession with wealth and castle-building through five generations beginning in 1429. Review

Joyce Elson Moore, Jeanne of Clairmonde (2009), historical romance about a French heiress forced to depend on the squire sent by the king to evict her from her estate at the beginning of the Hundred Years War.

Irene Reti, Kabbalah of Stone (2009), about the spirit of an Old Testament prophetess and a young man from a converso family in 1491 Spain, on the eve of the expulsion of the Jews. Review

Melodie Romeo, Vlad: A Novel (2002), a biographical novel about Vlad the Impaler, a fifteenth-century prince of Wallachia (once part of Hungary, now Romania); self-published.

Jean-Christophe Rufin, The Dream Maker (2013), about the fifteenth-century French merchant and financier Jacques Coeur.

Rafael Sabatini, Bellarion the Fortunate (1926), about a chivalric knight of humble origin in medieval Italy, loosely based on the life of the fourteenth-century mercenary soldier Sir John Hawkwood

Alan Savage, Queen of the Night (1993), about Queen Joanna of Naples.

Lawrence Schoonover, The Spider King (1954), about the late medieval French king Louis XI, who was born during the Hundred Years War when his father Charles was still the uncrowned Dauphin.

Henryk Sienkiewicz, The Knights of the Cross (1900; also titled The Teutonic Knights), a tragic story about a young Polish knight, his lady-love and the Battle of Grunwald (or Tannenberg) in 1410, in which the Poles and Lithuanians defeated the Teutonic Knights.

Barry Unsworth, Stone Virgin (1985), a literary novel set in Venice during the eighteenth and fourteenth centuries.

Peter Vansittart, The Tournament (1959), about the rituals and ceremonies surrounding a challenge to combat between a nobleman and the ruler of a fictional duchy resembling late medieval Burgundy, interrupted by a plague epidemic.

Peter Vansittart, A Safe Conduct (1995), about a children's revolt in a small German principality in the 1490s and the nobleman whose life it complicates. Review

Jill Paton Walsh, Knowledge of Angels (1994), about a young woman raised by wolves, a prince who is an atheist and an agent of the Inquisition who meet on a fictional Mediterranean island.

Florian Stone Wells, The Sword and the Shield of the Realm (2008), about a boy who inherits a mysterious legacy as fifteenth-century Hungary is threatened with invasion by the Ottoman Turks; includes a comprehensive glossary; #1 in a planned 7-book series.

Florian Stone Wells, Field of the Blackbirds (2008), about about the 1389 Battle of Kosovo; #2 in a planned 7-book series.

Jess Wells, The Mandrake Broom (2007), about a woman herbalist who works with Paracelsus to save the old medical knowledge and blend it with the new medical learning as the witch persecutions of the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries endanger herbalists.


Mysteries Set in the Continent, 14th-15th Centuries

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Cassandra Clark, Hangman Blind (2008), about a abbess in the aftermath of Wat Tyler's rebellion who sets out in search of a location for her religious establishment and comes across a group of corpses at a gibbet and a mystery that follows her back to her patron's castle; #1 in the Abbess of Meaux mystery series.

Cassandra Clark, The Red Velvet Turnshoe (2009), about an English abbess who travels to Italy on a mission to find a holy relic and along the way must investigate the murder of a clerk whose body is found in a shipment of wool; #2 in the Abbess of Meaux mystery series.

Cassandra Clark, The Law of Angels (2011), about an abbess who discovers that a young woman who has taken shelter as a guest in her community is being stalked by men who murdered her family; #3 in the Abbess of Meaux mystery series.

Cassandra Clark, A Parliament of Spies (2012), about an abbess whose archbishop brings her to London with him to serve as his spy at a parliament during King Richard II's reign; #4 in the Abbess of Meaux mystery series.


Alfredo Colitto, Inquisition (2011), about an anatomist at a university in fourteenth-century Italy investigating why the heart in a Templar knight's corpse has become an iron block.

Ann Dukthas, A Time for the Death of a King (1994), a time-traveling French Jesuit scholar investigates the murder of Lord Darnley, the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1567 Edinburgh; #1 in the Nicholas Segalla mystery series; Ann Dukthas is a pen name of P.C. (Paul) Doherty.

Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose (Italian edition 1980, English translation 1983), a literary murder mystery set in a monastery in fourteenth-century Italy during the time of the Inquisition.

David Hillier, Fire and Shadow (1996), about a twelfth-century woman who travels to Jerusalem during the Third Crusade to learn more about the mysterious pendant that may be connected to her parents' murder.

Catherine Jinks, The Inquisitor (1999), a stand-alone mystery novel about an inquisitor investigating the murder of his superior in fourteenth-century France.

Catherine Jinks, The Notary (2000), a stand-alone mystery novel about a notary hired to help an inquisitor investigate a grisly murder in fourteenth-century France.

Catherine Jinks, The Secret Familiar (2006), a stand-alone mystery novel about a former inquisitor's spy in fourteenth-century France who must return to his old work to investigate what happened to another spy for the Inquisition; not readily available outside Australasia.


Giulio Leoni, The Mosaic Crimes (titled The Third Heaven Conspiracy in the U.K.), the future author Dante Alighieri investigates a murder in medieval Florence.

Giulio Leoni, The Kingdom of Light (2009), a mystery featuring Dante doing some sleuthing on the side as he writes The Divine Comedy, when a galley with a dead crew lands in Florence with a damaged mechanical object on board.

Giulio Leoni, The Third Heaven Conspiracy (2011), a mystery featuring Florentine poet Dante Alighieri investigating the murder of a mosaic artist in a disused church; #3 in the Dante Alighieri mystery series.

Giulio Leoni, The Crusade of Darkness (2011), a mystery featuring Florentine poet and government official Dante Alighieri investigating a series of ritual murders after he is sent to Rome in 1301 to meet with the Pope; #4 in the Dante Alighieri mystery series.


James Patterson and Andrew Gross, The Jester (2003), about a man who returns from the Crusades to find his young son killed, his wife kidnapped, and his French village in ruins.


Caroline Roe, Remedy for Treason (1998), a blind Jewish physician in fourteenth-century Spain discovers that not all deaths in the midst of a plague outbreak were caused by the disease; #1 in the Isaac of Girona series.

Caroline Roe, Cure for a Charlatan (1999), a blind Jewish physician in fourteenth-century Spain must find the real cause behind a series of deaths to calm an outbreak of hysteria among townfolk who suspect witchcraft; #2 in the Isaac of Girona series.

Caroline Roe, Antidote for Avarice (1999), a blind Jewish physician who accompanies a bishop to a religious council turns sleuth to find out why so many messengers from the pope are dying; #3 in the Isaac of Girona series.

Caroline Roe, Solace for a Sinner (2000), a blind Jewish physician in fourteenth-century Spain investigates murder as rumors about the Holy Grail stir up religious fervor; #4 in the Isaac of Girona series.

Caroline Roe, Potion for a Widow (2001), a blind Jewish physician in fourteenth-century Spain investigate the murder of a clerk; #5 in the Isaac of Girona series.

Caroline Roe, A Draught for a Dead Man (2002), a blind Jewish physician travels to Catalonia for a wedding and finds himself in the midst of a risky plot to hide an escaped Christian convict in a Jewish ghetto where it's illegal for him to reside; #6 in the Isaac of Girona series.

Caroline Roe, A Poultice for a Healer (2003), a blind Jewish physician in medieval Spain investigates the poisoning death of a messenger who brings alarming news; #7 in the Isaac of Girona series.

Caroline Roe, Consolation for an Exile (2004), a blind Jewish physician in medieval Spain investigates a perplexing case of poisoning; #8 in the Isaac of Girona series.


James Runcie, The Colour of Heaven (2003), about a thirteenth-century Venetian glass-maker's wife and the abandoned child she takes in and raises.


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